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BEANS: Anyone Else Include Legumes/lentils In Their Diet Regularly?

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by SOMO, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. Janelle525

    Janelle525 Member

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    This could be true that it's clearing out some kind of bad overgrowth, but for me I'm fine the first couple days then things just get worse and worse so persisting is incredibly hard if not impossible. I used to love more fiber in my diet but after going a long time without on the RP diet it's like I can't re-introduce it. It's the anxiety that gets me.
     
  2. Liubo

    Liubo Member

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    I eat a tablespoon or 2 of black beans about once a week, with white rice, lettuce and salsa. They just taste good.
     
  3. Captain_Coconut

    Captain_Coconut Member

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    A large percentage of people seem to have the same experience as you. I think the key is in what the beans are being consumed with. Have you tried having beans without any saturated fat, or a meal with higher ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fats?
     
  4. lvysaur

    lvysaur Member

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    Yes, we have them. I never eat them because I find the idea of canned precooked food kind of gross. Anyway, my point is people here don't understand beans. It's like saying Turnips are bad so you shouldn't eat Carrots.

    People benefit from soaking beans. Also from sprouting. Also from smaller ones. You were eating big beans (bad) that were precooked (bad since they were cooked without soak or sprouting). I've gotten gas from restaurant beans as well.

    I eat mung beans (extremely small) on a weekly basis, sometimes sprouted. Zero gas issues. I think that if anyone here tried that with mung beans, or green/red lentils, or any other small pulse, they'd experience the same thing. I also eat all sorts of lentils unsprouted. I also eat big black beans, only if sprouted, among many others. No issues. There are two measures of safety here, smallness and sprouting. I think even the most raffinose intolerant person here could handle sprouted small lentils.
     
  5. Captain_Coconut

    Captain_Coconut Member

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    Consuming sprouts is great, especially if you sprout them yourself. Definitely more health promoting than the unsprouted equivalent. If done correctly I would guess they are exceptionally low in endotoxin when compared to other foods.
     
  6. lvysaur

    lvysaur Member

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    They're not sprouts, but sprouted beans. Sprouts (colloquially) are when you let the process go to completion, essentially turning the bean into a stem-like vegetable.

    Sprouted legumes are when you barely start the process, making nutrients more bioavailable but still keeping the protein content largely intact.

    Bean sprout:
    https://www.naturalfoodseries.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Bean-Sprouts-800x416.jpg

    Sprouted bean:
    https://savingdinner.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Sprouted-Lentils-300x199.jpg
     
  7. superGrover

    superGrover Member

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    What does "high quality protein" mean exactly?
     
  8. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    I am not RP but I personally interpret "high quality protein" via the amino acids they contain, the pro-metabolic AA's like glycine, proline, etc... contained in gelatin for example. Conversely, ones high in anti-metabolic AA's like tryptophan, cystine, methionine etc would be bad. I found out for myself that even too much milk was detrimental due to the excess of tryptophan and that even milk (at least for me) needs to be balanced with gelatin.
     
  9. Captain_Coconut

    Captain_Coconut Member

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    Right, that is how I used to consume them usually. Well I would sprout at home and eat at various stages, usually as soon as I saw some green. I miss doing it, I stopped because it sort of stinks up a house, best for the summer when windows can be open.
     
  10. Waremu

    Waremu Member

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    If one is going to try beans, I think one of the safest ones to eat are the traditional and beloved of Asia, Adzuki beans.

    They are well known for being one of the easiest to digest legumes and as far as PUFA content goes, these beans are one of the lowest PUFA beans for the amount of nutrition they pack. They're even lower than green lentils in PUFA, which Ray Peat recommends to be one of the safer legumes if one is going to eat them.

    Lentils are packed with folate, but have around 0.3 grams of PUFA per cup.

    Well, Adzuki beans pack a lot of folate as well, but have less than 0.1 grams of PUFA per cup. In fact, it takes about 3 cups of cooked Adzuki beans to hit just 0.1 grams of PUFA and you get a whopping 834.4 mcg of Folate, which is over double the RDA for Folate. You also get 66% RDA of Vitamin B1, 59% RDA of B5, 61% the RDA of B6, and 31% the RDA of Niacin/Vitamin B3. And look at the mineral content too. It is packed with Manganese, giving you 172% the RDA, and it is also a good source of Magnesium:

    upload_2019-2-19_20-57-43.png


    All around, for those who eat starch, providing that you digest them well, I think these beans are one of the most bang for your buck starches/legumes.

    Lastly, although I cannot find anything about the Molybdenum content of Adzuki beans, it is very likely that is also packed with Molybdenum, since it is a legume, similar to the other legumes which have been recorded to have high Molybdenum content. According to the link below, most of the popular legumes are very high in Molybdenum, ranging from 330% the DV/DRI to 273%, so it is very likely that Adzuki beans has somewhere between 330% and 273% the DRI/DV of Molybdenum.

    molybdenum


    upload_2019-2-19_21-8-59.png

    This website claims that a 100g cooked/boiled serving of Adzuki beans will yield about 96 mcg of Molybdenum:

    Nutritional values contained in Adzuki bean (whole, dried, boiled) | Whole Food Catalog

    If this website is correct, that would mean that a 1 cup serving of boiled Adzuki beans would yield about 240 mcg of Molybdenum, which would even put it well above green lentils in Molybdenum content, making it one of the top sources of the trace mineral within the legume family. That amount would be well over 500% the DRI/DV of Molybdenum!

    I added this because I was looking up food sources of Molybdenum because it is not very easy to get enough of if you're on a very low PUFA Ray Peat type of diet and eating fairly moderate-high protein (higher protein intake raises the need for more Molybdenum).

    I am at the current moment not eating starches as I am doing a strict low PUFA type of diet, but I have been thinking that I may have to add a little bit of Adzuki for the folate and Molybdenum content because there are few foods that are high in both and are yet so low in PUFA or low enough not to add much more to my PUFA limit range. I may try them and see how I digest them if I cook them well, but I really think it may be necessary even if it means adding a little starch because getting enough of those two nutrients is important enough for me as I stick with my PUFA 'depletion' diet goals. Oddly enough, it wouldn't take very much to get my daily folate and Molybdenum needs --- maybe just one serving of cooked beans.
     
  11. superGrover

    superGrover Member

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    On cronometer, kidney beans (100 grams, 124 cals) seem to just have more of every protein than skim milk (100 grams, 34 cals). They both seem equally balanced to me, minor differences.
     
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