What Kind Of Carb Is Best When Eating Higher Saturated Fats

Discussion in 'Metabolism' started by Pat, Mar 2, 2020.

  1. Pat

    Pat New Member

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    This isnt to cast blame on any single carb source in context of starch vs simple sugars. Might be wrong, but after reading Ray's research it seems that starch would be the offender on a diet that's not restrictive on saturated fats. My impression would be that simple carbs would be more beneficial because they dont drive up insulin as much, making the digestion of fat more efficient.

    So if this is true, how efficient is simple sugars (sucrose, maple syrup, milk, fruits) at storing muscle glycogen in the absence of all starch in this context? I'm in the Army, and while my physical demands arent as high as a trained athlete, we still have to workout minimum 1 hour 5 days a week, first thing in the morning with both run days and bodyweight exercise days. I'm 25 M, 5'6" at 175lbs, and I have bellyfat that I want to slowly remove, but I'd like to have enough energy for my basic drills. Those are my 2 priorities which hopefully dont compete.

    Has anyone had success to what I mentioned above? If so definitely let me know. My jobs big on height/weight and I'm sick of getting taped every time I'm overweight on the scale. No history of extreme dieting I might add. The weight crept up eating normal. Also no supplements beside a multi. For now I cant think of any other factors about myself. I just figured that the combinations of my diet can be a good place to start. I'm asking about how it works with a diet higher in fat because that macro is the bulk of what we are served (I'm guessing because its just higher in calories and easier to package) especially during field environments so I'd like to work around a factor like that.
     
  2. Jessie

    Jessie Member

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    You'll probably do fine with starch if you're that physically active. Try to stick with the "safer" starches like white rice and well cooked potatoes. Sugar will fill glycogen though, even in the muscles.

    If you wanted to use sugar, it would help to focus on high glucose as opposed to high fructose. So basically all the low fructose fruits would work, provided you ate enough to match your caloric needs. Some good examples are nectarines, apricots, ripe bananas, cooked plantains, cantaloupe, plums, figs to name a few. Brown rice syrup can be used instead of honey. The issue is getting enough of these to calorically match stuff like rice and potatoes. But it is possible
     
  3. Vegancrossfit

    Vegancrossfit Member

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    Matching potatoes calories is easy since tubers aren’t that dense compared to fruit.

    Matching grains calories that’s going to be tough, because they’re super dense.

    note that simple sugars being 50% glucose they’ll still fill up muscle glycogen.

    I don’t know how cardio heavy is US Army training. From what I’ve seen it’s definitely not strict bodybuilding and requires a lot of stamina. This will use a lot more liver glycogen, which is most readily replenished by galactose and fructose. Not so much starchy carbs that would be preferred for pure bodybuilding work maybe.

    So basically I’d pound on simple sugars.
     
  4. jamies33

    jamies33 Member

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    2kg of masa harina flour is $6 CAD. Can make little pancakes/cookies with salt, honey, even an egg (I add glycine)
     
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