I Don't Think I Can Recover, Suicidal| Mental Health Log

Discussion in 'Mental Issues' started by SuperStressed, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    That seems like a good product. Just keep taking that if you like it, in fact its probably better to get some liver daily, so if the supplement is good is fine, just watch out for taking too many supplements.

    I wouldn't rely on cronometer completely, the trace minerals in seafood is where the benefits lie and we don't have a good understanding of all the benefits. Just make sure you eat some once a week or more, maybe with garlic butter, make it really tasty.

    Mussels have a lot of the B vitamins (good for stress) and good portion of zinc too, maybe cook them with one of the tasty marinara sauces or white wine recipe. They're delicious and if you enjoy them more than oysters, they're just as good. Honestly I think clams, scallops, mussels and oysters all have complementary nutritional profiles and are delicious.

    If you eat greek yogurt with honey, along with a couple of glasses of homemade chocolate milk (use 1%) you're golden. Since you love OJ, keep drinking it too.

    Make sure to eat all the time, divide your meals, and keep your temperature elevated. Do you have a pull-up bar or dumbbells or some way to work your muscles a little at home? Slowly toning your muscles will raise the ratio of metabolically active tissues, raising temperature. Plus Ray said in recent interviews that muscle are the only tissues which can burn fat safely. If you can eat all those nice things, and stick with small meals throughout the day, keeping your temperature and pulse elevated, and build your muscles slowly, that will go a long way. Emphasize coconut oil over butter since it raises metabolism and anecdoctally seems good for fat loss.
     
  2. redsun

    redsun Member

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    Dr. Pfeiffer would say otherwise.

    "
    The National Academy of Sciences (1977) reports
    clinically apparent copper deficiency is extremely rare
    and difficult to achieve by dietary means. At the Princeton
    Brain Bio Center, where serum heavy metal leads have
    been routinely assayed since 1965, only three cases of low
    blood copper have been documented from over 25,000
    patients treated. These deficiencies were precipitated by
    excessive zinc ingestion. Sloane (1985) describes three
    additional clinical situations where low blood copper may
    be expected, in premature infants, in patients receiving
    total parental nutrition, and in severely malnourished
    children. On the other hand, 51% of all female patients and
    43% of all male patients at the Brain Bio Center have
    exhibited toxic levels of copper, accenting the pervasive-
    ness of this oral poison in modern society."

    "
    The toxic effects of copper stem from its properties
    as a nervous stimulant. Thus, profound effects may be
    visible not only within the central nervous system but
    amongst the majority of the organ systems. The stimula-
    tive effects of copper were first described by Ussing in
    1949 as he measured an increased electrical potential of
    frog skins placed in a copper-containing nutrient solution.
    Tonnies and Ferreira (1970) verified Ussing's findings
    with copper concentrations as low as 10 mM and postu-
    lated the increased electrical potential may be due to
    unrestricted sodium movement across the membrane. "

    Screenshot_20190818-130334_Drive.jpg

    "
    Pfeiffer and Goldstein (1984) using EEG (brain waves)
    demonstrated that 5 mgm of copper has in man the same
    central nervous system stimulative effects as 5 mgm of
    Dexedrine
    , a common amphetamine. "

    "
    Pfeiffer and his colleagues (1975) were the first to
    detail a definite role of copper in mental illness as they
    defined histapenia, a schizophrenia-like disorder. Hista-
    mine, a neurotransmitter and chemical modulator of the
    body, is regulated by the copper-containing proteins,
    histaminase and ceruloplasmin. Abnormally high levels
    of free copper increase the activity of these two enzymes
    resulting in excessive degradation of histamine. This
    histamine deficit is responsible for some of the specific
    psychiatric deviations seen in the schizophrenias.
    The neurotoxicity of copper may also arise from an
    energy deficiency resulting from the inhibition of the
    body's basic metabolic pathway, glycolysis. Lai and
    Blass (1984) have found high copper concentrations in rat
    brains inhibit hexokinase, pyruvate kinase and lactate
    dehydrogenase
    , essential enzymes in the production of
    energy. Not only may neuronal pathways be disrupted due
    to a neurotransmitter imbalance, but the neurons may
    actually be starved for energy. "

    Screenshot_20190818-130558_Drive.jpg

    "
    Behavioral manifestations of copper intoxication
    include disperceptions, thought disorders, hallucinations,
    paranoia, insomnia, violent behavior, withdrawal from
    reality, catatonic symptoms, and loss of drive. Depression
    and an obsession with suicide are significant clues that
    high copper and low histamine are responsible for the
    manifest psychiatric difficulties
    . "

    "
    Consequently, fewer basophils and mast cells are charac-
    teristic of histapenics. Allergies such as hay fever, asthma,
    or hives are rare; head colds are usually asymptomatic.
    Additionally, the non-secreting nature of such individuals
    leads to predisposition to poor dental health and difficulty
    in achieving sexual orgasm."

    "
    At the Brain Bio Center over a period of more than
    20 years we have found the blood histamine of the histap¬
    enic-high copper patient to average (male) 20.2 and
    (female) 27.6 mg/ml, where normal is 42 and 46 mg/ml for
    male and females. We find 1% of these patients to have no
    detectable blood histamine and no basophils either in the
    blood cells which contain most of the histamine. The
    serum copper is usually above 120 mcg%. We have
    reported that these histapenic patients have only 6 mg/ml
    of folic acid per ml of blood
    . This is one-half the level
    found in normals and pyrolurics. Their B-12 blood levels
    were normal at 649 pg/ml. Vitamin C in a 2.0 gram oral
    dose in schizophrenics will raise the urinary excretion of
    copper from 1.7 mcg/6 hrs. to 7.4 mcg/6 hrs. Similarly,
    niacin (vitamin B-3) will increase the urinary excretion to
    8.3 mcg/6 hrs (Pfeiffer and Bachi, 1975). The combina-
    tion as used in the treatment of these patients would be
    even greater. "

    Blood Type A Sequesters Copper:
    "
    Additionally, it has been revealed that certain blood
    types have an inherent propensity for accumulating cop-
    per in the body. Interest began in 1973 when Wiener et al.
    demonstrated significant differences among the three
    blood types of sheep with respect to copper levels in whole
    blood and plasma. Assuming that this suggested a bio-
    chemical difference between blood types, Bonnet, Pfeif-
    fer, and Aston (1980) undertook an investigative study of
    humans. Chronically hospitalized schizophrenic patients
    were revealed to have an unusually high incidence of type
    A blood.
    It appeared that these individuals have great
    difficulty excreting copper and require extensive therapy
    to ameliorate their psychosis.
    "

    Drinking Water Has Excess Copper:

    "
    A large portion of the copper we ingest is dissolved
    in our drinking water. Plumbing systems are frequently
    constructed with copper piping, rather than the older
    galvanized steel. Unusually acid or soft water dissolves
    the soft metal in some cases forming holes in the piping in
    as little as three years. Hard water, on the other hand, lines
    the pipe as its minerals precipitate out, protecting against
    the copper menace. Sharrett(1979) documented a positive
    correlation (0.85) between whole blood copper and drink-
    ing water concentrations in five U.S. towns. In a subse-
    quent study, Sharrett (1982) estimated the daily consump-
    tion of copper from drinking water in Seattle to be 2.2 mg,
    0.2 mg greater than the U.S.R.D.A. The following states
    were reported to have soft water by the U.S. Geological
    Service (1974) and should be considered risk areas:
    Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode
    Island, Connecticut, New York, Maryland, Delaware,
    Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia,
    Mississippi, Arkansas, Oregon, and Washington.
    Additionally, many sufferers add to their woes by
    taking multivitamin supplements, many of which contain
    2-3 mg of copper. Such multivitamins should be avoided.
    Smoking also seems to contribute to the copper intake
    in modern society. The U.S. Public Health Service
    (1979) reports the average cigarette contains 0.19 ug of
    copper and this is accumulated in the body as the smoke
    is inhaled. Copper is just another component of the
    well publicized health hazards associated with smoking.
    Copper intoxication can occur at any age, so this may be
    the cause of late onset schizophrenia (paraphrenia)."

    Screenshot_20190818-131210_Drive.jpg
     
  3. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    Dr. Pfeiffer was also overly cautious about avoiding copper. Its needed for pigmentation and basic oxidative processes.
    In Generative Energy Ray mentioned how he saw a talk of Carl Pfeiffer, and the guy looked like an albino despite not having been born an albino.

    Not to say he wasn't a great researcher, I have two of his books including Mental and Elemental Nutrients, but his take on copper shouldn't be followed to a T.
     
  4. lampofred

    lampofred Member

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    EMF definitely is a problem as other posters have mentioned, but even putting EMF aside, I think the internet can be very stimulating and depleting. I didn't really notice it at first since surfing the web doesn't feel like you're actually doing anything, but whenever I stay away from screens for a while, I can really feel my cortisol decreasing. Most websites are explicitly designed to be as stimulating as possible (the designers are just doing their job though, since they want you to visit the page), which raises cortisol, and having tabs after tabs open is really depleting, at least in my case.
     
  5. OP
    SuperStressed

    SuperStressed Member

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    Sadly niacin therapy is doing nothing. Up to 2 grams a dose now.

    Time to try B6 + Zinc.

    Im in such a state, I realise the reason I calm a bit when I eat junk is because the mindset has been to abondon any sort of plan. If eating what I want is the plan to recover I will stress about it. Its such a sorry affair, I don't see an escape.

    I'll try B6, maybe order 5 a dhp from haidut and then get off the Internet for an extended period of time. Quickly running out of supplements or drugs to try.
     
  6. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    It can take 2 or 3 months for niacin to work.
     
  7. SOMO

    SOMO Member

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    Try taking MB and Benadryl at night.

    I would also suggest Metergoline and other anti-serotonin/anti-prolactin drugs.

    Benadryl has a strong sedative effect so I would not use it during the day, but it seems like you need to break the cycle of hormonal stress.

    You also basically should do muscle relaxation/meditation for 10 minutes DURING the day. Nutrition is no replacement for mental/physical relaxation and meditation does something that supplements can’t do.
     
  8. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    Same, of these substances Metergoline might be able to break the cycle of helplessness. Cyproheptadine would allow help, but since it makes it easier to gain weight on it, Metergoline is possibly the best choice. I would take aspirin as well or at least in the meantime, it has potent anti-inflammatory/anti-stress properties and in myself reduces tension so much, provided it's dissolved with baking soda and taken after meal
     
  9. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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  10. Korven

    Korven Member

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    I believe this is a really important, if not the most important, piece of the health puzzle.

    A couple minutes every day of practicing relaxation, breathwork, meditation, mindfulness, or whatever you prefer can do wonders in my experience for reducing stress.

    Of course this can be quite hard to do when your anxiety/OCD is skyrocketing, but with some courage and practice it is possible to reach a tranquil state. A lot of stress comes from the activity of the mind, if you can instead focus on the sensations of your body (feeling, hearing and seeing) and quiet your mind the anxiety also lessens and cortisol goes down.
     
  11. OP
    SuperStressed

    SuperStressed Member

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    Tried cypro for 3 weeks, by the 3rd week I was up to 15mg per day with no effect so I stopped. I have metergoline and lisuride hanging around. Tried metergoline just once and never lisuride. Guess I'll try them. Benadryl is an interesting suggestion.

    I guess thats what this could be classed as ... intense learned helplessness. Any thought to make any kind of effort or change to get out of the situation just stresses me out to such an extreme (ocd/anxiety). I have taken Aspirin for periods of time in big and small doses and it didnt help.
     
  12. pinacolada

    pinacolada Member

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    This happens to me sometimes. What do you think the shock response means? High stress hormones?
    I emailed RP asking what he understands it to be and he never answered me unfortunately.
     
  13. SOMO

    SOMO Member

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    I used to meditate daily for a few minutes and then stopped for a few years much to my detriment.

    You don't need to become a yogi either, just a few short sessions (10-15 minutes is a good amount IMO).

    Hyper-Reacting to sudden sounds or getting annoyed by sounds is telltale sign of high adrenaline IMO.
    Basically "fight or flight" in the sense that reacting to sounds is a defensive measure meant to get your attention to a potential threat. My grandma who has high adrenaline symptoms can't even stand to have the TV too loud or it will strongly irritate her.
     
  14. OP
    SuperStressed

    SuperStressed Member

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    Does it make sense to anyone why cypropheptadine in such a big dose would not work? it lowers everything that we assume is high in a state like mine.
    **** I really think that medrol (or trauma from its effects) has damaged me in such a devastating way. I am suffering so much and im trapped.
     
  15. milkboi

    milkboi Member

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    Benadryl + MB is not recommend, because there is potential for MAO-A inhibition being too high.
     
  16. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    I think the value of cypro may be more in the long term, based on what I can gather from a few posts on this forum.
    Personally, aspirin has been able to do things for me no other drugs has been able to do.

    Try taking 500mg or so (I have aspirin powder) and put it in a little hot water, add 1/3 teaspoon of baking soda, and it will fizz and dissolve.
    When the fizzing stops, add some OJ or other fruit juice to that water to fill the glass and drink it, preferably after a meal.

    It is anti-inflammatory, anti-stress, stops the formation of prostaglandins from the stored PUFAs and has a strong anti-serotonin action (at least for me).
    I use both cypro and aspirin, because I've read a lot of good things about the long term benefits of cypro, and aspirin.

    But aspirin seems to work dramatically well for me, especially since I've learned to dissolve it completely. It calms me down like nothing else after a meal.
     
  17. OP
    SuperStressed

    SuperStressed Member

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    Ive tried it up to 3grams a day, did nothing for me. I had a lot of hope for it at the time. Ive got the pure powder from health natura.
     
  18. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    Did you try to dissolve it like I described? Before I did it that way it wasn't effective for me either.
    Give it a try man, and don't give up, we're all here to support one another.
     
  19. rmgwm

    rmgwm Member

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    I feel extremely confident I know what your issues are as well as how to greatly improve them. I know because I went through something extremely similar, it's not a coincidence that I guessed that you are jumpy and it hurts your nerves.

    Your issues are almost entirely cortisol/adrenaline related and can get far better if you have discipline and will-power to correct them. However, in my experience people would rather continue feeling bad rather than giving up the habits which are causing the problems. I'm not saying that's you, it's just my experience.
     
  20. Cirion

    Cirion Member

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    I don't think that's true. The reality is sick people would do anything to get well but I speak from personal experience still getting better from my own health issues 2 yrs later, that it's not possible to believe in miracle cures anymore, so that's why when someone says "just do this and you'll get better, I promise" you kinda roll your eyes and go yeah right, heard that 100x already. Not saying you don't have useful knowledge to impart on the OP, or that your advice won't work, but just that this is why people think this way. Like just the other day someone said "Just megadose Niacin man it will solve all your digestion and gut woes" well again, I've been here 2 yrs and still unwell so it's hard for me to believe this, considering this is just one of 100's of advice people have given me over the past 2 yrs, so yes, of course I'm skeptic lol. The advice may very well work, and it is quite possible I might try it in a week or two, but again, when you've tried 100 things already, you start to lose faith that #101 will finally do it lol.
     
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