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CAVITIES

Discussion in 'Oral Health' started by forterpride, Nov 27, 2013.

  1. forterpride

    forterpride Member

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    I've noticed so many improvements with this "diet" that I would hate to leave the sugar out...but I've noticed I've been getting small little cavities with all of this increased sugar intake. Does anybody have any advice on how to deal with this?
     
  2. loess

    loess Member

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    - swish/rinse/gargle with baking soda + water after meals and before bed. especially rinse after consuming OJ (citric acid sitting on the teeth will destroy tooth enamel.
    - when brushing use a soft toothbrush with baking soda BUT make sure toothbrush is wet or add water; dry baking soda alone is too abrasive for teeth. Sometimes I use activated charcoal in place of baking soda.
    - "oil pulling" with coconut oil
    - eat foods with a good calcium:phosphate ratio, definitely get enough calcium. don't have to worry too much about this if you are eating mostly or all Peat.
    - cavities might be a sign of other imbalances or deranged metabolic pathways (overactive parathyroid gland for example), not simply the result of consuming sugar
     
  3. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Do you drink coffee?
     
  4. Mittir

    Mittir Member

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    I eat a large amount of sugar 200+ grams daily. I only had sensitive teeth
    when i was drinking acidic foods like OJ and other sour fruits.
    I add pinch of baking soda or calcium hydroxide to neutralize the acids.
    Besides high calcium and low phosphorus intake, Vitamin K is very vital
    in dental health. I have noticed i get mild dental sensitivity whenever i skip
    weekly beef liver (4-8 oz) for more than 2 weeks. I believe it is the vitamin K, vitamin A
    and other nutrient in liver that strengthen teeth. Vitamin D is also needed to keep
    Parathyroid hormone in check.
     
  5. OP
    forterpride

    forterpride Member

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    I drink lot's of coffee...almost with every meal...over 4 cups a day..and yes...I also eat liver at least twice a week...oysters twice a week..my diet is really on point. I've been rinsing with baking soda after everytime i eat or drink anything...i think maybe i'll try the oil pulling and be more dilligent with the baking soda...maybe rinse longer.. I also use a rinse at night..ACT...which is ph balanced..and i only use sensodyne which has no sodium laural sulfate (I heard that stuff can do more harm than good)...I'll keep you updated...hopefully i'll see some improvements with more dilligence.
     
  6. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Are you sure those are not coffee stains? Because after I started drinking coffee one day I looked closely at my teeth and I am like OMG I got all the cavities where did they come from? :shock: :eek: :shock: :eek: Then I scraped off a couple spots with my fingernail and realized they where actually coffee stains.
     
  7. OP
    forterpride

    forterpride Member

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    Huh...I've never considered that..I'm going to buy a dental tool to try that because my nails cant get in to the little space. Thanks for the advice everyone.
     
  8. pboy

    pboy Member

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    mittir and Charlie both make a good point...its actually citric acid, and other acids, that are the offenders...not the sugar. Sugar is inert. When I used to drink a lot of wine, my teeth got stained and I thought there was a problem...over time switching to clear alcohols the stains disappeared. As mittir said, just don't let citrus or fruit acids sit on the teeth too long or they will become hyper sensitive. Compounds in coffee and chocolate have actually been found to keep the mouth healthy (bacteria wise)...though coffee could potentially leave a hint of tan. But yea, its not the sugar, its the acids, and things can stain, temporarily, but not actually be doing any structural damage. There was a point in time after following a fruit diet for...maybe 6 months, my teeth were so sensitive I couldn't even chew a cashew without some pain...that was the point I realized something was wrong. Its mostly high acid fruit and wine to be careful with, just swish after or eat a meal within maybe an hour to keep the acids off your teeth

    if there is indeed some eroded tooth, make sure you get a good amount of calcium, vitamin d, phosphorus, magnesium, boron, vitamin A, and vitamin K mostly. Milk or cheese covers almost all of that. If not, plenty of greens preferably cooked and strained to some extent, or very soft, and a lot of sunlight
     
  9. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Just to clarify not all coffee stains spots are easily scraped off. Brushing with charcoal works pretty good for removing stains.
     
  10. HDD

    HDD Member

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    Recently my teeth became very sensitive. I thought I had developed a lot of cavities. I searched the forum and read this about the baking soda and vitamin k. I had stopped using baking soda in my o.j. and I was taking a different vitamin k supplement because the local store I shop at was out of Super K. Since reading this post, I have added baking soda again and switched to Super K again. All tooth pain/sensitivity gone. :D I don't eat liver consistently, so I supplement both vitamin A and vitamin K.
     
  11. staytuned

    staytuned Member

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    Did you manage to get clarity on this or turn around your tooth health? From another thread on here people mentioned brushing with bentonite clay or purchasing a toothpaste with it in it (Earthpaste for example).
     
  12. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    I feel the most important thing to fight against cavities is vitamin K status. Vitamin K2 ultimately. Something that also might help it to chew some gum daily for saliva production. Vitamin K in saliva is the most natural way to fight cavities. :2cents
     
  13. j.

    j. Guest

    I think thyroid too. Peat thinks thyroid improves the quality of saliva.
     
  14. HDD

    HDD Member

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    "I use baking soda, and I rinse my mouth after having sugar, orange juice, etc. The quality of the saliva, regulated mainly by the thyroid hormone, is the main factor in dental health. My newsletter on osteoporosis mentioned some of the studies on thyroid, estrogen, and tooth decay."

    from Ray Peat's Brain
     
  15. Tom

    Tom Member

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  16. Kasper

    Kasper Member

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    What about oil puling with coconut oil and estroban (or just vitamin MK-4) ?
    Anyone tried that ?
     
  17. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    I like the oil pulling with coconut oil. I haven't tried the vitamin k with it though. I have used activated charcoal with it and that seems effective to me. I only do that at night though because it looks kind of disturbing! Usually by rinsing my mouth afterward and sleeping through the night I can brush with baking soda in the morning and there is no visible trace of the charcoal.
     
  18. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    I suppose sometimes what you don't say speaks volumes. What I didn't say above about my personal experience with oral health is I think the better my metabolism and hormone balance the better everything is including my teeth and gums. I have found what the others posted above about thyroid to be very true for me too.
     
  19. Jakobi

    Jakobi New Member

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    How dentinal fluid transport can be interrupted or the genesis of tooth decay revisited

    According to Dr. Steinman's research findings, while external contamination does affect the tooth, tooth decay starts when normal tooth metabolism is upset and fluid flow is interrupted, impeded, stagnating or even reversed. As the flow can be self-cleansing, it can also be self-contaminating. Dr. Steinman identified several pathways for this to occur, among them

    High sugar intake reverses dentinal fluid transport
    Stress can interrupt dentinal fluid transport
    Lack of exercise
    Lack of micronutrients
    Pharmacological agents

    Sugar

    When no sugar is taken, the dentinal fluid flowed normally from within the pulp chamber outside. In contrast, no significant flow occurred in the presence of a high sugar intake. This effect was observed even after injecting the sugar directly into the lining of the abdominal cavity, i.e. completely bypassing the teeth.

    Stress

    Dr. Steinman thankfully seems to have just done one experiment where he stressed a group of rats (by confining them in a narrow cage which allowed little movement). Comparing this group to another fed an identical diet, it was shown that the stressed animals developed higher rates of caries. He summarised it as tooth decay being more pronounced when the system is “sympathetic dominant”.

    Exercise/circulation

    Studying the effect of exercise on caries susceptibility, Dr. Steinman observed that when he placed two groups of rats on the same nutrient-deficient diet, the group that was exercised developed 4.8 carious lesions per animal while the non-exercised group developed a whopping 14.9. This result would indicate that exercise increased the dentinal fluid movement and/or quickly burned off the sugar circulating in the blood so it had no time to negatively affect the hypothalamus, the regulatory gland for dentinal fluid movement (see "How the fluid transport system mechanism works" below). Dr. Steinman also noted that circulatory problems due to illness or declining health impacted dentinal flow, causing flow stagnation and reversal.

    Micronutrients

    Compare "Copper, iron, manganese and other trace elements can halt/reduce tooth decay in rats" below.

    Pharmacological agents

    After injecting bradykinin (a sympathetic compound) intraperitoneally into the experimental rats, Dr. Steinman observed centripetal (inward) movement of fluid in their teeth. In fact, the administration of bradykinin actually resulted in tooth decay in rats fed a non-cariogenic diet! Similar negative effects on caries rate were observed with the use of hydrogen peroxide. Parasympathetic stimulants had the opposite effect, encouraging centrifugal (outward) dentinal fluid flow (compare "A pharmacological approach to preventing tooth decay" below).

    www.healingteethnaturally.com/dentinal- ... onora.html
     
  20. answersfound

    answersfound Member

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    Vitamin A, D, E, K eliminated cavities for me.
     
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