One Of The Biggest Things Messing Your Digestion Up

Discussion in 'Digestion' started by Hans, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. Hans

    Hans Member

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  2. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    Thank you. Are you trying to say that shipping times are much longer, as we get produce from more distant lands, and this is what makes agricultural food into a digestive issue? I’m not really sure what you were saying in this article.
     
  3. Mauritio

    Mauritio Member

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    Interesting point of view. Where I live there's a supermarket that only sells stuff from the region around it ,so that's good.
    It kind of makes sense when you watch it from a stone age person's view and that's still what our bodies are made for.
     
  4. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    I guess that it's unpredictable, making it challenging to adapt. And that local foods are probably better suited to nourish you for having matured in a similar environment.

    The point is valid, however quality of produce is the priority, and I doubt that most people will have the chance to make things predictable without compromising it.

    Our dear Westside used to share Liam's (related) ideas:
    - Paleo Diet Illusions and Myths - We're All Truck-a-tarians
     
  5. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    local foods condemns most of the population to cabbage and potatoes 4 to 6 months of each year.
     
  6. Anders86

    Anders86 Member

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    I would think bloating, burping, cramps, intestinal gurgling, edema, brain fog, sinus issues, frequent flatulence etc. became an issue because of farming..
     
  7. Lollipop2

    Lollipop2 Member

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    Prior High Oxalate consumption in combination with GI issues most likely exasperated the build up in my tissues and contributed to even more GI problems. Have been low oxalate consumption for about 4 months now and see a vast improvement in GI. So much so, that I have almost not needed any of the GI support I needed before, ie digestive enzymes.

    edit: I am actually surprised by the results of low oxalate. I thought in the beginning it was a bit extreme and out there, but something internally pushed me forward. Probably the fastest results I have seen in measures I have taken. Low PUFA and Ray Peat understanding leading to certain food choices has been the best long term strategy I have used.
     
  8. Homo Consumericus

    Homo Consumericus Member

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    Original topic; useful consideration. Like many other features of city slicker life, not much to be done about it.
     
  9. Homo Consumericus

    Homo Consumericus Member

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    His features looked somewhat malnourished-- reminiscent of the classic vegan visage-- so I skipped forward to the end of the 5th minute, and sure enough he's bloviating about how we're denying ourselves minerals for strong bones by eating protein (which, according to his next nugget of wisdom, causes gallstones). This is a direct contradiction of reality and evidence since bones are primarily protein structures and high protein diets have reversed osteoporosis.
     
  10. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    Assimilating cues from an poorer environment (due to limiting the possibities) can't be good.
    If the person looks frail, the information deserves to be skipped to a random part where you decide it's a good idea to comment in spite of being irrelevant to the topic?
     
  11. OP
    Hans

    Hans Member

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    I'm basically saying that the food from one farm can cause you to react differently than the exact same food from a different farm, for example, potatoes.
    You can even experience a difference in foods just by say a 100 miles or so. For example, the food grown on one side of a mountain can be different from the food grown on the other side of the mountain due to more rain and better quality soil, for example, compared to the other side which might be more depleted in minerals, is more rocky and/or hard and dry etc.

    Where I'm from, and most places I know of, have quite a seasonal variety in local foods. Where are you from where they have only potatoes and cabbage?

    People have been farming for centuries and even as far as history dates back. Unless you were a hunter like an Indian/Native American who travelled with their meat source (buffalo). The problem these days with farming is mass farming - not rotating crops, not giving the soil a chance to rest (which is what smart farmers do), using toxic chemicals and fertilizers etc.

    You can still try to get your meats and produce from the same (good quality) supplier. For instance, you can get the same brand of milk and try to get your vegetables from the same supplier (which doesn't necessarily mean you have to get all your vegetables from one store/market but it can be helpful to stick to certain brands/suppliers if their produce is good quality. For meat you can always order from wellness meats (just as an example) or from a game farm or from a farmer's market, if one of those options are available to you. Just small changes that can contribute to a more consistent, healthier diet can make a big difference.
     
  12. berk

    berk Member

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    @Hans lets me ask u a rhetorical question.
    if a farmer want to grow some potatoes on his land.
    What is the first step he must do?
     
  13. OP
    Hans

    Hans Member

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    Well, the soil is always first priority. And then he'll have to get him some seed potatoes. Not sure why this is a rhetorical question though? ...Because potatoes come from potatoes?
     
  14. berk

    berk Member

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    exactly and where are de seed potatoes come from?
    answer: at a supplier, where get the supplier his seed potatoes (tuber)? everywhere of the word and every year from other places because the price is every year different.
    So even the farmer dont now (and dont care) where his seed potatoes come from. He only cares what breed and prices are.
     
  15. OP
    Hans

    Hans Member

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    Regardless of where the seed potatoes come from, the soil and the nutrients, toxins, microbes, etc., in the soil, as well as the weather, etc., have a much larger effect on the whole crop. If one seed potato creates say 10 new potatoes, where did that potatoes get their nutrients and water from? From the soil. The microbes, etc., influence the quality of that crop. So the location where the crop is grown and the quality of the soil still matter a great deal more than where the seed potatoes come from.
     
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