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Astaxanthin

BaconBits

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Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
131
Astaxanthin is a carotene, so it could interfee with thyoroid and steroids, but such a little dose is needed for it to work.
A dose of 4 mg can stop sun burn, its extreme potent antioxidant potency can be extremely usefull to stabilize the polynsaturated fats inside the body.

What do you think about it?
 

jaguar43

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Oct 10, 2012
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ksemen said:
Astaxanthin is a carotene, so it could interfee with thyoroid and steroids, but such a little dose is needed for it to work.
A dose of 4 mg can stop sun burn, its extreme potent antioxidant potency can be extremely usefull to stabilize the polynsaturated fats inside the body.

What do you think about it?

the synthetic version is chemically different from the natural. You can probably get enough if you eat sea foods.
 

BaconBits

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Apr 26, 2013
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jag2594 said:
ksemen said:
Astaxanthin is a carotene, so it could interfee with thyoroid and steroids, but such a little dose is needed for it to work.
A dose of 4 mg can stop sun burn, its extreme potent antioxidant potency can be extremely usefull to stabilize the polynsaturated fats inside the body.

What do you think about it?

the synthetic version is chemically different from the natural. You can probably get enough if you eat sea foods.

The supplement form is extracted from algae, therefore natural. Its hard to get it from food, only the animals higher the food chain will have enough astaxanthin.
 

Gabriel

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May 7, 2013
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Antioxidants are not per se healthy. External (dietary or supplemented) antioxidants may hamper with the body's own antioxidant systems. ß-carotene is one example, and RP advises against taking high doses of it. I'd be careful with other similar ones especially when there is not yet enough data out on them.

Recommended reading: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22537212
 

BaconBits

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Yes, but it is hard to avoid polysaturated fats, especially if you dont eat at home 100% of the time. astaxanthin could be usefull to stabilize that.
 

jaguar43

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Oct 10, 2012
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ksemen said:
jag2594 said:
ksemen said:
Astaxanthin is a carotene, so it could interfee with thyoroid and steroids, but such a little dose is needed for it to work.
A dose of 4 mg can stop sun burn, its extreme potent antioxidant potency can be extremely usefull to stabilize the polynsaturated fats inside the body.

What do you think about it?

the synthetic version is chemically different from the natural. You can probably get enough if you eat sea foods.

The supplement form is extracted from algae, therefore natural. Its hard to get it from food, only the animals higher the food chain will have enough astaxanthin.

I think shrimp, oysters, Crustacean contain Astaxanthin so eat those foods more.
 

jaketthomas

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Feb 9, 2013
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Astaxanthin has been used to add color to farm raised fish and in fish food for decades. I know research is indicating that it has benefits in humans, but the research is still too new, and the supplement is RIDICULOUSLY expensive. If you want astaxanthin, I agree with jag. Eat shrimp. That's where most of the commercial astaxanthin comes from anyway.
 

Gabriel

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May 7, 2013
Messages
229
ksemen said:
Yes, but it is hard to avoid polysaturated fats, especially if you dont eat at home 100% of the time. astaxanthin could be usefull to stabilize that.

If you are healthy non-inflamed and well-metabolizing, your body will handle the pufas without a problem and without needing any supplements. PUFAs are only a problem if eaten in high amounts for a long time (cumulative toxicity).

All natural foods contain small amounts of PUFA - the body co-evolutionized with them - hence there is no reason to believe that the body can't handle these natural amounts found in real foods.
 

pboy

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Jan 22, 2013
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Gabriel said:
ksemen said:
Yes, but it is hard to avoid polysaturated fats, especially if you dont eat at home 100% of the time. astaxanthin could be usefull to stabilize that.

If you are healthy non-inflamed and well-metabolizing, your body will handle the pufas without a problem and without needing any supplements. PUFAs are only a problem if eaten in high amounts for a long time (cumulative toxicity).

All natural foods contain small amounts of PUFA - the body co-evolutionized with them - hence there is no reason to believe that the body can't handle these natural amounts found in real foods.
and if you have saturated fat and sugar available to burn, the PUFA's will be excreted through the urine or bile according to Peat...my general rule is more saturated fat than PUFA, but as little PUFA as possible as well...Astaxanthin may or may not have benefit, but I think it would be a waste of time, money, effort, and at divert your attention from more important matters
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2016
Messages
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I have been interested in astaxanthin for a while. It makes your skin look amazing, turns UV light into IR light in your skin (similar to melanin), and is a potent antioxidant that embeddes itself in the "lipid bilayer" (Antioxidant and lipid bilayer. Two things Peat hates :D)

What first got me interested in astaxanthin was that it's supposed to make it impossible for you to burn in the sun, and also that it makes your skin beautiful.

But then I looked deeper.

In this post by haidut, he mentions that Peat mentioned that flamingos and lobsters really don't age much at all. The common link? Astaxanthin... Er, well carotenoids. But mostly astaxanthin.

This study says that astaxanthin in really high doses enhances neurogenesis and spatial learning in rats.

Basically, I'm going to buy a ton of astaxanthin and supplement with it. I might dissolve some in DMSO and test that as well.

I'm thinking of doses between 20mg-1g. Either way it's going to be expensive as f*ck.

I would love a discussion about astaxanthin.
 

Hasen

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Joined
Aug 21, 2016
Messages
72
Yeah I was also a proponent of astaxanthin. I don't think you can get it easily on a peat diet though can you? Have to supplement. Although I seem to remember the amount you get from food is not much anyway, regardless of what you eat.
 

satsumass

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Oct 13, 2016
Messages
68
The problem with asta is that it supposedly is a 5-ar inhibitor and thus reduces DHT substantially.....anyone have any direct experience with this?
 

johnwester130

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Joined
Aug 6, 2015
Messages
3,416
My final thoughts on astaxanthin -

It does lower DHT
It lowers thyroid and makes you tired
It gives you cold hands

It protects against PUFA in theory
It makes you smell.
In men, it makes their scrotum smell
Astaxanthin capsules stink

Avoid it - absolutely not worth it
 

TubZy

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Sep 30, 2016
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From Ray on asta:

"In small amounts it’s safe, but highly unsaturated compounds can interfere with thyriod and steroid metabolism if they accumulate to high levels."
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2016
Messages
526
@BigYellowLemon did you ever do the asta experiment? Would love to hear your thoughts including details on dosage, responses, etc.

No, I never did.

I have taken it before though, 10mg a day for around 30 days.

My skin might've changed color but it was pretty unnoticeable.

I noticed no health benefits.

Considering it's an antioxidant, and that it embeds itself in lipids, I think it has great promise, it could help stop lipid peroxidation.

But, as with most things, in the real world it seems pretty useless.
 

LeeLemonoil

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Sep 24, 2016
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Transcriptome analysis reveals mechanisms of geroprotective effects of fucoxanthin in Drosophila


Published: 9 February 2018

Abstract
Background
We have previously showed that the carotenoid fucoxanthin can increase the lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the geroprotective effect of fucoxanthin have not been studied so far.

Results
Here, we studied the effects of fucoxanthin on the Drosophila aging process at the molecular and the whole organism levels. At the organismal level, fucoxanthin increased the median lifespan and had a positive effect on fecundity, fertility, intestinal barrier function, and nighttime sleep. Transcriptome analysis revealed 57 differentially expressed genes involved in 17 KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways. Among the most represented molecular pathways induced by fucoxanthin, a significant portion is related to longevity, including MAPK, mTOR, Wnt, Notch, and Hippo signaling pathways, autophagy, translation, glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, immune response, neurogenesis, sleep, and response to DNA damage.

Conclusions
Life-extending effects of fucoxanthin are associated with differential expression of longevity-associated genes.


Fucoxanthin - Scientific Review on Usage, Dosage, Side Effects
 
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