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Peaty way to increase Vitamin K without supplementation?

Xavage

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Jan 3, 2021
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I have noticed in the Ray Peat community much importance on getting adequate Vitamin K into diet.

Besides supplementation, what do people recommend to get optimal Vitamin K in diet? Should it be paired with other nutrients?

Cooked kale once a week?
Pastured eggs every morning?
Beef liver once a week?
 

Hans

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Aug 24, 2017
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I have noticed in the Ray Peat community much importance on getting adequate Vitamin K into diet.

Besides supplementation, what do people recommend to get optimal Vitamin K in diet? Should it be paired with other nutrients?

Cooked kale once a week?
Pastured eggs every morning?
Beef liver once a week?
Dairy fat and organs (mostly liver) mainly. Beef fat also contains a good amount.
 

Xavage

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T
Dairy fat and organs (mostly liver) mainly. Beef fat also contains a good amount.
Thanks Hans,

Some of the Vitamin K levels reported on the web aren't very high for organ meats. Does Peat think these measurements are wrong or something?

Also how much Vitamin K should a 30 year old 6ft 4 and 100kg lean male aim to consume each day?
 

Hans

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T

Thanks Hans,

Some of the Vitamin K levels reported on the web aren't very high for organ meats. Does Peat think these measurements are wrong or something?

Also how much Vitamin K should a 30 year old 6ft 4 and 100kg lean male aim to consume each day?
Vit K2 content can vary a lot based on what the animal ate. Animals during spring usually produce the most K2 since then their diet is abundant in it. Plus, they don't test all the K2 forms.
To see how much you require, you can test undercarboxylated osteocalcin.
 

Apollo

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Apr 15, 2015
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@Xavage
Saint Louis Style Pork Ribs have recently (2016) been discovered to be one of the richest dietary sources of menaquinones (2), also collectively known as vitamin K2.
 
Joined
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RP: "Cooked greens, milk, cheese, and eggs are very good sources of K. The solvents used to extract vitamin K, for example from natto, often cause problems. The present vitamin K culture is the creation of marketing campaigns, and is causing a lot of harm."

In the studies he mentioned he specifically talked about the benefits of VIT K1 - Not K2.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1971;41(2):180-8.
The relationship between the storage forms of vitamin K and dietary phylloquinone
in the dog.
Duello TJ, Matschiner JT.

J Nutr. 1998 Feb;128(2):220-3.
Conversion of dietary phylloquinone to tissue menaquinone-4 in rats is not
dependent on gut bacteria.
Davidson RT, Foley AL, Engelke JA, Suttie JW.
Department of Nutritional Sciences, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences,
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
The ability of male rats to accumulate menaquinone-4 (MK-4) in tissues when fed a
vitamin K-deficient diet supplemented with intraperitoneal phylloquinone (K) as
the sole source of vitamin K for 14 d was assessed. In both conventionally housed
controls and gnotobiotic rats, supplementation with the equivalent of 1500 microg
vitamin K/kg diet increased (P < 0.001) tissue MK-4 concentrations above those of
controls fed a vitamin K-deficient diet. MK-4 concentrations were approximately 5
ng/g (11 pmol/g) in liver, 14 ng/g in heart, 17 ng/g in kidney, 50 ng/g in brain
and 250 ng/g in mandibular salivary glands of gnotobiotic rats. MK-4
concentrations in conventionally housed rats were higher than in gnotobiotic rats
in heart (P < 0.01), brain (P < 0.01) and kidney (P < 0.05) but lower in salivary
gland (P < 0.05). Cultures of a kidney-derived cell line (293) converted K to the
expoxide of MK-4 in a manner that was dependent on both time of incubation and
concentration of vitamin K in the media. A liver-derived cell line (H-35) was
less active in carrying out this conversion. These data offer conclusive proof
that the tissue-specific formation of MK-4 from K is a metabolic transformation
that does not require bacterial transformation to menadione as an intermediate in
the process.


Calif Med. 1970 Apr;112(4):65-7.
Don't use the wrong vitamin K.
Udall JA.
The emergency use of vitamin K is essentially limited to the reversal of
drug-induced hypoprothrombinemia. In patients with adequate liver function,
phytonadione acts promptly and predictably in this capacity whereas the
derivatives of menadione counteract coumarin drugs only slightly or not at all.
It is dangerous to rely on menadione analogues, and these drugs should be removed
from emergency room drug stores.

Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:296721.
Vitamin K1 exerts antiproliferative effects and induces apoptosis in three
differently graded human colon cancer cell lines.

Orlando A(1), Linsalata M(1), Tutino V(2), D'Attoma B(1), Notarnicola M(2), Russo
F(1).
(1)Laboratory of Nutritional Pathophysiology, National Institute for Digestive
Diseases IRCCS "Saverio de Bellis", Castellana Grotte, 70013 Bari, Italy.
(2)Laboratory of Nutritional Biochemistry, National Institute for Digestive
Diseases IRCCS "Saverio de Bellis", Castellana Grotte, 70013 Bari, Italy.
Vitamin K1 has been demonstrated as having anticancer potentiality mainly in
liver cancer cells. Beyond the reported mechanisms of cancer inhibition (cell
cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis), a possible control by vitamin K1 on
molecules affecting cell growth could be hypothesized. In the literature, few (if
any) data are available on its antitumor effects on colon cancer cells.
Therefore, the aims of the study were to investigate in three differently graded
human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480) the effects of
increasing concentrations of vitamin K1 (from 10 μM to 200 μM) administered up to
72 h on (1) cell proliferation, (2) apoptosis with the possible involvement of
the MAPK pathway, and (3) polyamine biosynthesis. Vitamin K1 treatment caused a
significant antiproliferative effect and induced apoptosis in all the cell lines,
with the involvement of the MAPK pathway. A concomitant and significant decrease
in the polyamine biosynthesis occurred. This is the first study demonstrating a
significant polyamine decrease in addition to the antiproliferative and
proapoptotic effects following vitamin K1 administration to colon cancer cell
lines. Therapeutically, combinations of vitamin K1 with polyamine inhibitors
and/or analogues may represent a suitable option for chemoprevention and/or
treatment in future strategies for colorectal cancer management.

Scand J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jun;49(6):715-21.
Vitamin K1 attenuates bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats.
Jiao K(1), Sun Q, Chen B, Li S, Lu J.
(1)Department of Laboratory Animal Science, School of Basic Medical Science,
Capital Medical University , Beijing, 100069 , China.
Vitamin K1 is used as a liver protection drug for cholestasis-induced liver
fibrosis in China, but the mechanism of vitamin K1's action in liver fibrosis is
unclear. In this study, a model of liver fibrosis was achieved via bile duct
ligation in rats. The rats were then injected with vitamin K1, and the levels of
serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, total bilirubin and the
fibrotic grade score, collagen content, the expressions of α-smooth muscle actin
(SMA) and cytokeratin 19 (CK19) were measured on day 28 after ligation. The
levels of the biochemical parameters, fibrotic score and collagen content were
significantly reduced by treatment with vitamin K1 in bile duct-ligated rats. In
addition, α-SMA and CK19 expression was significantly reduced by vitamin K1
treatment in bile duct-ligated rats. These results suggested that vitamin K1 may
attenuate liver fibrosis by inhibiting hepatic stellate cell activation in bile
duct-ligated rats.
 
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76er

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Apr 8, 2021
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Cheeses can help. e.g.


tldr;
- Vitamin K plays a key role in blood clotting and in bone and cardiovascular health
- Cheese, and semi-hard cheese in particular, is an important source of this microbially synthesised vitamin.
- The highest levels of vitamin K2 are found in Raclette, Vacherin Fribourgeois and Emmentaler.
- The consumption of Swiss cheese can cover an average 13–17% of the daily vitamin K requirement. Traditional cheese dishes such as raclette and fondue actually provide amounts in excess of the daily requirement.
 

Marcine

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Jun 20, 2019
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Location
Ecuador
I believe he says to cook the ***t out of greens and drink the broth. I just use Health Natura's K-it lasts at least a year at one drop a day
 

Lord Cola

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Jun 8, 2017
Messages
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Vitamin K supplementation seems to have a more noticeable pleasant effect than eating beef liver relating to vitamin K's effects. I'm guessing a cow's diet affects its liver's vitamin content.
 
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