Bamboo Shoots

A. squamosa

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Hey, does anyone in Australia know of any good brands of bamboo shoots that aren't:
1) in a can with toxic lining
2) doesn't have unhealthy/gut disturbing additives

Carrots make me orange (even after shredding and rinsing) and I don't have time to be constantly cooking mushrooms, nor do I think I could stomach them every day.

Thanks!
 
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Mushrooms should be reconsidered.

I grind them and cook them in a pressure cooker. I could just as easily use a pot and boil them longer.

They last forever, it seems, in the fridge, and I eat 2 tablespoons a day. They actually taste pretty good. I really was tired of carrots. These I can do for a long time.

And they are quite an aromatase inhibitor, at least the liquid is. I'm not sure the solids are. But they work awesomely.

TL;DR: Really easy to make and last a long time, tasty.
 

A. squamosa

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Thanks for replying!
How much do you cook, how long do they last for, and how long do you boil them? Also, what's the point of grinding them?
 

Dave Clark

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I asked the same question months ago, and got no reply, so I figured there is no such source of bamboo shoots that isn't in a can. After all, why would you want to consume something to help with estrogen, etc., only to consume more xenoestrogens. I don't eat anything in a can if I can help it, unless it is a company that uses non-plastic inert lining. Read a study they did giving canned food to a group of teenage boys, against a control group, and their bisphenol levels in their blood were in the four digits, wasn't that much food either.
 

A. squamosa

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I found bamboo not in can, but it has gross additives (+ packaged in soft plastic which isn't great) - couldn't bring myself to eat it. I'm gonna try out the mushrooms!
 

churchmouth

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Eating bamboo shoots from Woolworths "valcom" brand as I speak.

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I soak them for a while to hopefully drain off any of the additives. Maybe we can further boil them to leach out BPAs into fresh water? They are pretty soft already though (pre-cooked).
 

cyclops

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I thought boiling mushrooms was gonna be time consuming too, but its so easy. I just put water and mushrooms in a pot put it on the stove and come back an hour or two later. Then I have boiled mushrooms for a few days. I think its worth it.
 

churchmouth

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I like to mix it up between carrots / bamboo / mushrooms. Often will have mushrooms + either carrot or bamboo.
 

Dave Clark

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Speaking of bamboo, has anyone heard of bamboo fiber? Saw it somewhere on a European add for gluten free cooking. Sounded interesting, and wondered if it would have the same benefits as the shoots. Probably high in silica.
 

Wagner83

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Effect of bamboo shoot, Bambusa arundinacea (Retz.) Willd. on thyroid status under conditions of varying iodine intake in rats. - PubMed - NCBI

Indian J Exp Biol. 2004 Aug;42(8):781-6.
Effect of bamboo shoot, Bambusa arundinacea (Retz.) Willd. on thyroid status under conditions of varying iodine intake in rats.
Chandra AK1, Ghosh D, Mukhopadhyay S, Tripathy S.
Author information
Abstract

Young shoots or sprouts of common bamboos are used as food in third world countries. Evidences suggest the presence of cyanogenic glucoside like anti-thyroidal substance in bamboo shoots (BS) but effect of prolonged BS consumption on thyroid status under conditions of varying iodine nutriture remains unexplored. The study was undertaken to evaluate goitrogenic content, in vitro anti thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity and in vivo anti thyroid potential of BS with and without extra iodide. Fresh BS contains high cyanogenic glucoside (551 mg/kg), followed by thiocyanate (24mg/kg) and glucosinolate (9.57mg/kg). In vitro inhibition in TPO activity was found with raw, raw boiled and cooked extracts. Inhibition constant (IC50) and PTU equivalence of fresh BS were 27.5+/-0.77 microg and 3.27 respectively. Extra iodide in the incubation media reduced TPO inhibition induced by BS but could not cancel it. Thyroid weight, TPO activity and total serum thyroid hormone levels of BS fed animals for 45 and 90 days respectively were determined and compared with controls. Significant increase in thyroid weight as well as higher excretion of thiocyanate and iodine along with marked decrease in thyroid peroxidase activity, T4 and T3 levels were observed in BS fed group. Chronic BS consumption gradually developed a state of hypothyroidism. Extra iodide had reduced the anti-thyroidal effect of BS to an extent but could not cancel it because of excessive cyanogenic glucoside, glucosinolate and thiocyanate present in it.


Goitrogenic content of Indian cyanogenic plant foods & their in vitro anti-thyroidal activity. - PubMed - NCBI

Indian J Med Res. 2004 May;119(5):180-5.
Goitrogenic content of Indian cyanogenic plant foods & their in vitro anti-thyroidal activity.
Chandra AK1, Mukhopadhyay S, Lahari D, Tripathy S.
Author information
Abstract

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES:
Consumption of cyanogenic foods has been considered as one of the etiological factors in certain instances for the persistence of endemic goitre. The present study was undertaken to study the cyanogenic glucosides, glucosinolates and thiocyanate content in edible portion of certain selected plant foods of Indian origin. Further in vitro anti-thyroidal activity using raw, boiled and cooked extracts of these plants with and without excess iodide was also studied.

METHODS:
Cyanogenic plant foods generally vegetables were collected from different areas of West Bengal and Tripura. Cassava was obtained from Meghalaya and Kerala and their cyanogenic glucosides, glucosinolates and thiocyanate were estimated. Thyroid peroxidase activity (TPO) of human thyroid was assayed from microsomal fraction following I3- from iodide. The anti-TPO activities of the plants were assayed after adding raw, boiled and cooked extracts in the assay medium with and without extra iodide. Relative antithyroidal potency of the plant extracts was also evaluated in terms of the concentration (IC50) necessary to produce 50 per cent inhibition of TPO activity. PTU equivalence of the plant foods was also determined.

RESULTS:
Cabbage and cauliflower were rich in glucosinolates, bamboo shoot and cassava were rich in cyanogenic glucosides, mustard, turnip and radish were relatively rich in thiocyanate however all the constituents were present in each plant. Boiled extracts showed maximum inhibition of TPO activity followed by cooked and raw extracts. Excess iodide was found relatively effective for raw extract but less effective for boiled and cooked extracts in reversing anti-TPO activity. Inhibition constant (IC50) was found highest with bamboo shoot and least with cabbage.

INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION:
Raw, boiled and cooked extracts of the plants showed anti-thyroidal activity in vitro. Excess iodide reversed the anti-TPO activity to same extent but could not neutralise it.

Bonus:
A mass cyanide poisoning from pickling bamboo shoots. - PubMed - NCBI

Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Nov;49(9):834-9. doi: 10.3109/15563650.2011.618456. Epub 2011 Oct 5.
A mass cyanide poisoning from pickling bamboo shoots.
Sang-A-Gad P1, Guharat S, Wananukul W.
Author information
Abstract

CONTEXT:
Bamboo shoots contain cyanogenic glycosides named taxiphyllin. Cyanide poisoning from cyanogenic glycosides commonly occurs following ingestion. However, toxicity caused by inhalation of hydrogen cyanide gas (HCN) produced from pickled shoots has never been reported.

OBJECTIVE:
To describe cyanide poisoning in eight victims who were exposed to HCN produced in a well containing pickling bamboo shoots.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Due to a series of botched rescue attempts, a total of eight patients entered into a 27 m(3) well containing pickled bamboo shoots and immediately lost consciousness. After rescue, two patients developed cardiac arrest, metabolic acidosis and died. Four other patients suffered metabolic acidosis, but recovered after supportive care. The remaining two regained consciousness and recovered soon after the event. Ambient air study and cyanide content of bamboo shoots helped confirm the diagnosis.

RESULTS:
All patients had high anion gap metabolic acidosis with normal oxygenation. Blood cyanide levels ranged from 2.66 to 3.30 mcg/ml (taken after about 18 h of incident). Ambient air study (21 h after incident) revealed oxygen 20.9%, and sulfur dioxide 19.4 ppm. The instrument was unfortunately not equipped to detect HCN. A simulation study revealed HCN and sulfur dioxide in the ambient air at 10 ppm and 7.5 ppm, respectively. Cyanide content in the bamboo shoots ranged from 39 to 434 mg/kg in the wet shoots.

DISCUSSION:
This series of patients developed sudden onset of alteration of consciousness and metabolic acidosis upon exposure, and cyanide was confirmed in all victims. The simulation study confirmed the presence of HCN in the ambient air of the well containing bamboo shoots.

CONCLUSION:
We have reported mass acute cyanide poisoning with two fatalities. The source of HCN was unusual as it was produced from pickling bamboo shoot.


Courtesy of @Amazoniac
 

Luckytype

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Messages
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I go through about 1kg(uncooked measure) of white button mushrooms a week. There is a distinct difference in my regularity with them vs without.
 

Dave Clark

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Jun 2, 2017
Messages
1,250
Effect of bamboo shoot, Bambusa arundinacea (Retz.) Willd. on thyroid status under conditions of varying iodine intake in rats. - PubMed - NCBI

Indian J Exp Biol. 2004 Aug;42(8):781-6.
Effect of bamboo shoot, Bambusa arundinacea (Retz.) Willd. on thyroid status under conditions of varying iodine intake in rats.
Chandra AK1, Ghosh D, Mukhopadhyay S, Tripathy S.
Author information
Abstract

Young shoots or sprouts of common bamboos are used as food in third world countries. Evidences suggest the presence of cyanogenic glucoside like anti-thyroidal substance in bamboo shoots (BS) but effect of prolonged BS consumption on thyroid status under conditions of varying iodine nutriture remains unexplored. The study was undertaken to evaluate goitrogenic content, in vitro anti thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity and in vivo anti thyroid potential of BS with and without extra iodide. Fresh BS contains high cyanogenic glucoside (551 mg/kg), followed by thiocyanate (24mg/kg) and glucosinolate (9.57mg/kg). In vitro inhibition in TPO activity was found with raw, raw boiled and cooked extracts. Inhibition constant (IC50) and PTU equivalence of fresh BS were 27.5+/-0.77 microg and 3.27 respectively. Extra iodide in the incubation media reduced TPO inhibition induced by BS but could not cancel it. Thyroid weight, TPO activity and total serum thyroid hormone levels of BS fed animals for 45 and 90 days respectively were determined and compared with controls. Significant increase in thyroid weight as well as higher excretion of thiocyanate and iodine along with marked decrease in thyroid peroxidase activity, T4 and T3 levels were observed in BS fed group. Chronic BS consumption gradually developed a state of hypothyroidism. Extra iodide had reduced the anti-thyroidal effect of BS to an extent but could not cancel it because of excessive cyanogenic glucoside, glucosinolate and thiocyanate present in it.


Goitrogenic content of Indian cyanogenic plant foods & their in vitro anti-thyroidal activity. - PubMed - NCBI

Indian J Med Res. 2004 May;119(5):180-5.
Goitrogenic content of Indian cyanogenic plant foods & their in vitro anti-thyroidal activity.
Chandra AK1, Mukhopadhyay S, Lahari D, Tripathy S.
Author information
Abstract

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES:
Consumption of cyanogenic foods has been considered as one of the etiological factors in certain instances for the persistence of endemic goitre. The present study was undertaken to study the cyanogenic glucosides, glucosinolates and thiocyanate content in edible portion of certain selected plant foods of Indian origin. Further in vitro anti-thyroidal activity using raw, boiled and cooked extracts of these plants with and without excess iodide was also studied.

METHODS:
Cyanogenic plant foods generally vegetables were collected from different areas of West Bengal and Tripura. Cassava was obtained from Meghalaya and Kerala and their cyanogenic glucosides, glucosinolates and thiocyanate were estimated. Thyroid peroxidase activity (TPO) of human thyroid was assayed from microsomal fraction following I3- from iodide. The anti-TPO activities of the plants were assayed after adding raw, boiled and cooked extracts in the assay medium with and without extra iodide. Relative antithyroidal potency of the plant extracts was also evaluated in terms of the concentration (IC50) necessary to produce 50 per cent inhibition of TPO activity. PTU equivalence of the plant foods was also determined.

RESULTS:
Cabbage and cauliflower were rich in glucosinolates, bamboo shoot and cassava were rich in cyanogenic glucosides, mustard, turnip and radish were relatively rich in thiocyanate however all the constituents were present in each plant. Boiled extracts showed maximum inhibition of TPO activity followed by cooked and raw extracts. Excess iodide was found relatively effective for raw extract but less effective for boiled and cooked extracts in reversing anti-TPO activity. Inhibition constant (IC50) was found highest with bamboo shoot and least with cabbage.

INTERPRETATION & CONCLUSION:
Raw, boiled and cooked extracts of the plants showed anti-thyroidal activity in vitro. Excess iodide reversed the anti-TPO activity to same extent but could not neutralise it.

Bonus:
A mass cyanide poisoning from pickling bamboo shoots. - PubMed - NCBI

Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Nov;49(9):834-9. doi: 10.3109/15563650.2011.618456. Epub 2011 Oct 5.
A mass cyanide poisoning from pickling bamboo shoots.
Sang-A-Gad P1, Guharat S, Wananukul W.
Author information
Abstract

CONTEXT:
Bamboo shoots contain cyanogenic glycosides named taxiphyllin. Cyanide poisoning from cyanogenic glycosides commonly occurs following ingestion. However, toxicity caused by inhalation of hydrogen cyanide gas (HCN) produced from pickled shoots has never been reported.

OBJECTIVE:
To describe cyanide poisoning in eight victims who were exposed to HCN produced in a well containing pickling bamboo shoots.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Due to a series of botched rescue attempts, a total of eight patients entered into a 27 m(3) well containing pickled bamboo shoots and immediately lost consciousness. After rescue, two patients developed cardiac arrest, metabolic acidosis and died. Four other patients suffered metabolic acidosis, but recovered after supportive care. The remaining two regained consciousness and recovered soon after the event. Ambient air study and cyanide content of bamboo shoots helped confirm the diagnosis.

RESULTS:
All patients had high anion gap metabolic acidosis with normal oxygenation. Blood cyanide levels ranged from 2.66 to 3.30 mcg/ml (taken after about 18 h of incident). Ambient air study (21 h after incident) revealed oxygen 20.9%, and sulfur dioxide 19.4 ppm. The instrument was unfortunately not equipped to detect HCN. A simulation study revealed HCN and sulfur dioxide in the ambient air at 10 ppm and 7.5 ppm, respectively. Cyanide content in the bamboo shoots ranged from 39 to 434 mg/kg in the wet shoots.

DISCUSSION:
This series of patients developed sudden onset of alteration of consciousness and metabolic acidosis upon exposure, and cyanide was confirmed in all victims. The simulation study confirmed the presence of HCN in the ambient air of the well containing bamboo shoots.

CONCLUSION:
We have reported mass acute cyanide poisoning with two fatalities. The source of HCN was unusual as it was produced from pickling bamboo shoot.


Courtesy of @Amazoniac
What would Ray think of these studies, since he recommends bamboo shoots, and dislikes goitrogenic foods? I don't eat bamboo shoots, but I drink bamboo leaf tea, now you have me wondering if that has any cyanide compounds in it.
 

michael94

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What would Ray think of these studies, since he recommends bamboo shoots, and dislikes goitrogenic foods? I don't eat bamboo shoots, but I drink bamboo leaf tea, now you have me wondering if that has any cyanide compounds in it.



Mustard turnips and radishes? ( refereing to thiocyanate in second study ) Funny because I know someone who likes to snack on radishes and she also eats mustard plain by itself.
 
Last edited:
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lol
Precooking processing of bamboo shoots for removal of anti-nutrients

Bamboo shoots being low in fat, high in dietary fiber and rich in mineral content, like an ideal vegetable have been used traditionally.
Besides nutrients, bamboo shoots also contain lethal concentration of the anti-nutrient (cyanogen) that need to be removed before human consumption.
Therefore an attempt has been made to find out the best processing method for confiscation of cyanogens. B. bambos, B. tulda, D. strictus and D.asper were selected for the study.
Fresh and processed bamboo shoots were analyzed for their various nutritional and anti-nutritional contents.
Carbohydrate content in fresh shoots of studied species ranged from 2.39%–3.6%, proteins from 1.65%–2.08%, phenols from 0.36%–0.63%, cyanogens from 0.011%–0.018%, minerals did not vary significantly among the species except potassium which ranged from 0.32%–0.52%.
The shoots were processed by boiling in water and different concentrations of NaCl (1%, 5% and 10%) for different intervals (10, 15, 20 and 25 min) to achieve maximum removal of cyanogens with minimum loss of nutrients.
Boiling shoots in 5% NaCl for 15 min was found to be the best method for B. bamboos, 10 min boiling in 1% NaCl for B. tulda, 15 min boiling in 1% NaCl for D. strictus and 10 min boiling in 5% NaCl for D. asper.
These processing methods will be very useful in utilization of bamboo shoots as these are very simple and can be used by the local inhabitants and shoot processing industries.
 

Wagner83

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'It reveals that the best method for reducing the concentration of cyanogens (0.011 ± 0.003 g/100 g in fresh shoots to 0.002 ± 0 g/100 g after treatment) was boiling shoots in 5% NaCl for 15 min.... "

From what I remember the other results in the study were similar, the concentration of cyanogens was divided by 5-6.

For the record:

Cyanide poisoning - Wikipedia

Chronic exposure
Exposure to lower levels of cyanide over a long period (e.g., after use of improperly processed cassava roots as a primary food source in tropical Africa) results in increased blood cyanide levels, which can result in weakness and a variety of symptoms, including permanent paralysis, nervous lesions,[10][11][12] hypothyroidism,[11] and miscarriages.[13][14] Other effects include mild liver and kidney damage.[15][16]

[...]

In addition to its uses as a pesticide and insecticide, cyanide is contained in tobacco smoke and smoke from building fires, and is present in many seeds or kernels such as those of almonds, apricots, apples, oranges, and in foods including cassava (also known as yuca or manioc), and bamboo shoots. Vitamin B12, in the form of hydroxocobalamin (also spelled hydroxycobalamin), may reduce the negative effects of chronic exposure, and a deficiency can lead to negative health effects following exposure.[19]
There are other questionable compounds in bamboo shoots, but the in vitro studies had found that any form has en effect. Perhaps this is relevant anyway, especially for those who use it a few times daily.
 
Last edited:

Logan-

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What does RP think of bamboo shoots' very high oxalate content and their goitrogenic effects?
 

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