Lowering Prolactin May Lead To Weight Loss

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The study focuses on cabergoline (a prolactin lowering drug with dopaminergic qualities), however the abstract discusses positive results with other anti-prolactin drugs like bromocriptine. In light of the recent study showing serotonin inhibition treating obesity, this is yet another confirmation that pro-dopaminergic therapies improve metabolism and thus obesity.
    The dose used in this study was pretty reasonable - <1mg cabergoline per week, split in 2 or more doses. So, something like 0.5mg cabergoline taken twice a week should work and is in fact pretty standard first like therapy for lowering prolactin.

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 03.46/full
     
  2. RPDiciple

    RPDiciple Member

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    In terms of serotonin inibition, why does cypro increase appetite in people and lead to weigh gain in many people?

    I also read that paper where they did something to reduce or inhibit serotonin and made people/mouse? get teen like metabolism
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    For cypro, it is the antagonism of one of the serotonin receptors (I think) that causes the appetite change. The paper on serotonin showed that inhibiting peripheral serotonin via TPH-2 inhibition restored metabolism. Another way to achieve similar results is to block serotonin receptors.
     
  4. RPDiciple

    RPDiciple Member

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    how do we do that ? :P i guess blocking is kind of risky but somewhat get the same effect. Is there something that has been proven that is working exept ofc all the foods and stuff RP talk about for raising serotonin in the first place
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    If you restrict tryptophan somehow you will not synthesize much serotonin unless you overtrain and muscle breakdown releases tryptophan in the blood. Eating lots of gelatin is one way. Another is taking quinine. See my other post from today about quinine, which seems to be very promising.
     
  6. RPDiciple

    RPDiciple Member

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  7. tara

    tara Member

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    Plenty of calcium is helpful for lowering prolactin, too, right?
     
  8. natedawggh

    natedawggh Member

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    Didn't someone just post an article about Zinc lowering prolactin?
     
  9. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Yes, I have seen studies on calcium lowering prolactin and Peat has said so as well. Other things that are effective are vitamin B6, vitamin E, vitamin A, and vitex. Zinc is a hit or miss, and in some people it raises prolactin.
     
  10. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Yes, they did, and I posted on zinc more than a year ago as well. The problem with zinc is that there are about 30 studies on PubMed about zinc and prolactin, and the results are really mixed. In some people zinc is ineffective at best and in others it actually raises prolactin. So, I guess you could try zinc but I would try to measure prolactin before and after to see how it is affecting me. I personally confirmed that for me zinc does NOT lower prolactin, but vitamin E does very well.
     
  11. Nick Ireland

    Nick Ireland Member

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    Haidut, have you tested Bromo or Caber yourself. I tried Bromo some time ago after blood tests showed high prolactin. It feels like it's half life is fairly quick and one has to keep topping up to avoid rebound.
    I also noted from an informed discussion on another thread that having high cortisol tends to chew up drugs quickly, even depot injectables. My cortisol was sky high for a long time - over 600. I got it down to 350 and perhaps it's lower now. Cortisol also increases stomach acid, which can be quite irritating, especially at night and creates a stress reinforcing loop as well as an acidic blood and lower gut ph.
    The best thing I ever used, it seemed, for prolactin was Retinol - the results were fast. A discussion you were involved in peaked my interest. In it, you said lowering prolactin was also a means of lowering cortisol as they had a reciprocal relationship. I have Caber, but never tried it. The long half life is attractive. If I understand correctly. Caber mimics dopamine at it's own receptors, sending shutdown signals to the portion of the pituitary involved in prolactin signalling. More impressive is that this can shrink micro tumours of the pituitary which can often remain hidden. I see that Benadryl blocks a serotonin receptor conducive to prolactin, amongst others, 5h2c I think? So does Mirtazapine - but it's noradrenaline promotion is an unwelcome side, making Benadryl a better choice. What do you think?
     
  12. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Bromocriptine has a decent half-life of 12-14 hours, at least based on sources I have seen. This means taking one dose daily would be sufficient. This is also how it is often prescribed for prolactin - one dose daily.
    Benadryl and prolactin link is very interesting but I have not seen any studies of human data on it. Do you have some references? If Benadryl lowers prolactin I would expect to see a surge in libido and people are NOT reporting that. If anything, it seems to lower their libido and desire to do much. But I would gladly review any info showing prolactin effects.
    Cabergoline is dangerous IMHO. That's why it is not often prescribed. Bromocriptine can also be dangerous but in lower doses seems to be much safer than cabergoline. Also, whatever negative effects bromocriptine has can be safely negated with a concurrent dose of cyproheptadine or mainserin/mirtazapine. It would also have additive beneficial effects due to blocking serotonin even more. Same thing can be done with lisuride, even though it is safer than bromocriptine and does not need a serotonin blockers to protect from serotonergic effects. So, a good thing to ask your doctor about would be to try 4mg cypro (or 15mg - 30mg of mianserin/mirtazapine) + low dose of bromocriptine or lisuride. From what I hear the effects are really potent on both metabolism and libido.
     
  13. Blinkyrocket

    Blinkyrocket Member

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    Benadryl really made me feel good, increased libido and lowered anxiety at doses of around 1/6 of a tablet (6 mg) but I haven't been taking it for awhile so I need to take it again to see if it was actually Benadryl that was making me feel good. What dose antagonizes serotonin?

    P.S. I was able to overcome agoraphobia and drive myself to work while taking Benadryl, now I'm uncertain about it and haven't been taking Benadryl.
     
  14. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I don't know that Benadryl antagonizes serotonin. That's why I said I would be VERY interested to see some studies or data on it. Actually, Benadryl acts like an SSRI in higher doses (150mg+ daily) but that does not automatically preclude it from antagonizing serotonin somewhat since the SSRI Prozac (fluoxetine) is also a serotonin antagonist at the 5-HT2C/B "receptor".
     
  15. Stuart

    Stuart Member

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    @Haidut
    Do you know anything about Mucuna Prurien's purported prolactin lowering effect?
     
  16. Blinkyrocket

    Blinkyrocket Member

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    I saw a chart the showed benadryls affinity (is that the word?) for certain receptors at certain doses and it listed a whole bunch of stuff but I never saw serotonin antagonizing on there, I just took the dose required to lower histamine.
     
  17. Nick Ireland

    Nick Ireland Member

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    Stuart, just saw this and though I'd tell you I'd tried Mucuna. It is great at the start, but the effects do seem to attenuate somewhat over time. There seems to be a balance between progesterone and anything that raises dopamine. It has to be just right. I'm thinking it's prudent to supplement progesterone or pregnenolone in combo with a dopamine agonist as (from what I've read) they counter each other to achieve a workable level. For example, some anabolic steroids lean onto the progestin side of things and body builders often take a dopamine agonist to balance the weighting towards progesterone - to keep their sex drive. Seems like a lot of hard work to me, brother! I noticed with Bromo that the first few days are great, but then the good effects seemed to wane somewhat. I suspect I should have pumped up my own progesterone a little to match the rise in dopamine?
     
  18. answersfound

    answersfound Member

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    Does the Vitamin E from Sunflower Oil (non-gmo) lower prolactin, or does it have to be the mixed tocopherols type?
     
  19. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I don't think it matters what type of tocopherol you take in regards to prolactin levels. The study with vitamin E was from Turkey and at the time they did it there was probably no availability of mixed tocopherols. In fact, I am pretty sure most clinical research used tocopheryl acetate up until early 2000s, which has only about 50% of the activity of natural tocopherol and was still effective.
     
  20. Parsifal

    Parsifal Member

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    Haidut, you are saying that there is no cell receptors but how do you explain the effects on different "receptors" reported by those drugs with your paradigm?
     
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