Lacking vitamin K

Discussion in 'Vitamins' started by Rrr, Feb 22, 2015.

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  1. Rrr

    Rrr Member

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    According to cronometer, my diet's really lacking vitamin K.

    I know Ray recommends liver for vitamin K, but I'm a student and my money situation just doesn't allow expensive products like that. What I need is a cheap and easy vitamin K source. I'd rather eat real food than supplements, but if there aren't any safe and cheap food sources I'll just have to be content with supplementing it. : )

    Green veggies aren't really recommended here, but would broccoli or kale be "okay" if they are cooked properly? Anything else?

    Thanks in advance for any replies and advice. : )

    -R
     
  2. tara

    tara Member

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    Goodness, if liver is too expensive for you, I wonder how you are managing to get other good food too. Where I am, liver is one of the cheapest cuts of meat, and you don't need to eat very much of it to get the benefits. Well cooked kale broth can provide some (where I am, that would cost more than liver), and Peat has sometimes suggested it as an occasional supplement of vit-K and minerals.
    Thorne K2 costs quite a few dollars, but a bottle can last several months, depending on how you dose it.
     
  3. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Lamb liver is cheap in my area. Not surprisingly given the taste. Calves liver costs more, but cheap when taking into account that its only a weekly food. Unfortunately, it will be difficult to get information about K2 content of those various foods because not many people care about them, and in addition maybe it varies with animal, location, time of year, diet etc.

    High quality dairy products should be high in K2. For example in the fat of whole milk of pastured cows. I know this from the time I was experimenting with aspirin, and drinking quality milk would solve the K2 depleting effect of aspirin. The usual store milk (even organic) did not do that, I'm guessing its poor in K2 and other nutrients.
     
  4. narouz

    narouz Member

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    I was thinking the same thing about liver's cost.
    I've never bought it at the regular American markets--
    I've always spent a bit more for a high-quality liver...but still relatively cheap,
    given, as tara wrote, the small amount needed.
    If you go to like a Krogers or BiLo or something
    they have frozen beef liver, and even sometimes calf liver, for cheap.
     
  5. cout12

    cout12 Member

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    liver is probably like 10x cheaper than broccoli and kale calorie wise, not sure vitamin k wise but I would bet also 10x cheaper.

    Also if I were you I'd just supplement it. A good vitamin k supplement will cost you like 10$ a month to get the DRA and will prevent you from having to buy expensive and long to cook foods like broccoli and kale.
     
  6. andvanwyk

    andvanwyk Member

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    I eat spinach twice a week for my vitamin k. It doesn't take much to get enough and it also comes with loads of magnesium and many other nutrients. A quarter cup of cooked spinach provides 185% rda of vitamin k. It's pretty cheap if you buy it frozen.
     
  7. OP
    Rrr

    Rrr Member

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    Thanks for all the replies. Supplementing vitamin K seems to be the easiest and cheapest way for me. : )
     
  8. barbwirehouse

    barbwirehouse Member

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    A small serving of spinach or kale VERY easily hits 100% vit k, if you're extremely lazy you can grab a supplement.
     
  9. tara

    tara Member

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    Ox liver is cheaper than lambs fry round here. I eat and enjoy both. :)
     
  10. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    If you buy greens you will match the price of a slice of liver without even counting the energy to cook it, oil, soap, water. The Thorne costs something like fifty slices of liver but if you take one drop per day (tens to hundreds time RDA) there should be like twelve hundred drops if I am not mistaken (over three years).
     
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