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What Is The Raw Material Cholesterol Is Made From?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Health Discussions' started by Westside PUFAs, May 17, 2017.

  1. Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    Please don't just say "fat" or "amino acids."

    Please don't just post a link to "cholesterol synthesis."

    Please be specific.

    Not dietary cholesterol. Cholesterol made by your liver.

    The liver makes it, but from what?

    Answer the question, what is the raw material cholesterol is made from?

    .
     
  2. meatbag

    meatbag Member

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    Acetyl CoA from glycolysis of glucose and Beta oxidation of fatty acids
     
  3. Diokine

    Diokine Member

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  4. meatbag

    meatbag Member

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    protons, neutrons, and electrons....we must go deeper
     
  5. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Obviously potatoes since it's a westside thread :emoji_thinking:
     
  6. haidut

    haidut Member

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    As @Meatbag said the original source is Acetyl-CoA and from there through the mevalonic pathway, through squalene and then lanosterol. Here is the (rough) outline of steps.
    Mevalonic acid - Wikipedia
    Dimethylallyl pyrophosphate - Wikipedia
    Farnesyl pyrophosphate - Wikipedia
    Squalene - Wikipedia
    Lanosterol - Wikipedia

    So, anything that gets converted into Acetyl-CoA, which means all 3 macronutrients, but really comes down to pyruvate (from glycolysis and gluconeogenesis) and beta oxidation of fatty acids.
     
  7. Mito

    Mito Member

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  8. Xisca

    Xisca Member

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    I thought cholesterol had to do with some steroids, hormones so.

    Edit, I see it above, this is the reverse, steroids are MADE from cholesterol.

    This question makes me think that when I was a young student, a blood tst showed I had to low cholesterol, and the MD told me I did not eat enough FATS, which was true at this moment; so is this true we make it more specifically from fats?
     
  9. meatbag

    meatbag Member

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  10. Xisca

    Xisca Member

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    I was not vegan and eat and ate meat
    BUT I do have a bad liver, actually that was the reason why I ate little fat. I did not stand it well. Actually I discovered that good mayo solved the problem (I can even make coconut oil mayo!)
    I should test it again because it was a long time ago.

    Thanks for answer meatbag, and I am a meatbag as well, I love meat and hate veganism (vegans are fine, they are poeple!)
     
  11. tankasnowgod

    tankasnowgod Member

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    Anthony Colpo mentioned this study a while ago- Dietary Cholesterol and Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy with Resistance Training: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial -- Riechman et al. 22 (1): 962.13 -- The FASEB Journal

    Basically, men 50-69 ate similar diets with varying amounts of cholesterol (200, 400, or 800mg a day) and also engaged in weight training. The higher dietary cholesterol, the better the strength gains, even though all groups gained the same amount of muscle mass. So, even if you can make all you need under normal circumstances, there could be times where you would benefit from having extra from diet.
     
  12. OP
    Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    So if it can be made from protein and carbohydrate then the idea that one must eat fat to make cholesterol to then make hormones is wrong. So if you cut out one macro completely you'd always still make cholesterol.

    .
     
  13. opiath

    opiath Member

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    I would say yes.

    Dietary fat helps to keep up cholesterol levels because it brings along dietary cholesterol.
    If dietary cholesterol is absent the rate limiting step to cholesterol synthesis is upregulated (HMG-CoA reductase).

    The raw materials for one molecule of cholesterol are:
    18 moles Acetyl-CoA
    16 moles NADPH
    36 moles ATP

    Cholesterol synthesis requires the presence of both insulin and thyroxine (T4).
    It can be suppressed by high levels of cortisol or glucagon.
     
  14. Kyle M

    Kyle M Member

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    The liver doesn't make cholesterol as often as it complexes it into lipoproteins. That's what doctors and many researchers mean when they say the liver is making and secreting cholesterol.
     
  15. OP
    Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    But if acetyl-coa is made from amino acids and/or carbohydrate then you don't need fat to make it. And you don't want to keep cholesterol "up," you want to always be converting it into the protective steroids.
     
  16. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Well, yes, I think it is pretty much settled that a person can live on a completely fat-free diet. I think there is even a study making the rounds on popular press - you can live more or less fine on nothing but potatoes and water. The ketoacids in potatoes give you amino acids once ingested and there is plenty of starch to be used as carbs.
     
  17. tca300

    tca300 Member

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    I've been eating under 20 grams of fat for months now without any so called fat refeed days, ( plenty of fruit and protein though ) my cholesterol was 165 as of a few weeks ago, so obviously fat is not needed.
     
  18. schultz

    schultz Member

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    Yah, though there seems to be this idea in the health community that you need fat for testosterone and stuff. Sugar probably is better for cholesterol than fat.

    Ray always recommends sugar for cholesterol and in the podcasts has talked about Yudkin. He said he thought Yudkin's arguments were very good in regards to sugar raising cholesterol.

    " was so impressed by his arguments that sugar increases blood lipids, saturated fats and cholesterol that was what started me on the idea of recommending increased sugar for people who under stress, because I had already become convinced that there was no basis at all for the connection between high cholesterol and saturated fats and atherosclerosis and heart disease and so on. And so when I would see someone deficient in progesterone, having too much estrogen and age pigment, they would often recover if they could increase their cholesterol production and the simplest way to do that was to have them eat some extra sugar"
     
  19. Wagner83

    Wagner83 Member

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    Comparative effects of saturated and unsaturated lipids on hepatic lipogenesis and cholesterogenesis in vivo in the meal-fed rat. - PubMed - NCBI

    Influence of stearic acid on cholesterol metabolism relative to other long-chain fatty acids. - PubMed - NCBI
     
  20. 2thecloudsabove

    2thecloudsabove Member

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    Aside of reducing dietary cholesterol intake, what else could be done for increasing raw hepatic cholesterol synthesis from lanosterol? In order to improve available 7-dehydrocholesterol levels and so increasing its conversion to cholesterol sulfate through sunlight reaction.
     
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