What did Ray Peat meant about the horrible enzymes in cheese

Discussion in 'Cheese' started by BaconBits, Oct 7, 2013.

  1. BaconBits

    BaconBits Member

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    I dont quite understand.

    What do we have to look for. I dont really understand how cheese is made. I now it is made traditionally with "rennet", stuff from one of the cow stomachs.

    Now they make GMO rennet like stuff from fungi or bacteria, is that what he meant. Or are fungi and bacteria like conventional and used instead of rennet. Is rennet safe?

    So what now, is organic cheese OK? What do you have to look on a label? Are there any safer cheese, like to say Gouda or is there no rule. Does heating over the 60°c (or 100°C) destroy the bacteria and enzymes and make it safe, like in pizza?
     
  2. kiran

    kiran Member

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    Re: What did Ray Peat meant about the horrible enzymes in ch

    It means that non-rennet (including vegetarian,usually bacterial, rennet) cheeses can irritate your gut. So traditional rennet cheese is ideal. I think you can eat whatever you can tolerate ...
     
  3. Ingenol

    Ingenol Member

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    Re: What did Ray Peat meant about the horrible enzymes in ch

    It should say "animal rennet." At least here in the US just "rennet" can mean vegetarian. Parmesano reggiano and other imported hard cheeses are the most likely to still be made with animal rennet.
     
  4. OP
    BaconBits

    BaconBits Member

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    Re: What did Ray Peat meant about the horrible enzymes in ch

    This is what wikipedia says:

    "Rennet is a mixture of enzymes used to coagulate cheese. Originally it was available only from the fourth stomach of calves, and was scarce and expensive, or was available from microbial sources, which often suffered from bad tastes. With the development of genetic engineering, it became possible to extract rennet-producing genes from animal stomach and insert them into certain bacteria, fungi or yeasts to make them produce chymosin, the key enzyme in rennet.[52][53] The genetically modified microorganism is killed after fermentation and chymosin isolated from the fermentation broth, so that the Fermentation-Produced Chymosin (FPC) used by cheese producers is identical in amino acid sequence to the animal source.[54] The majority of the applied chymosin is retained in the whey and some may remain in cheese in trace quantities.[34] In ripe cheese, the type and provenance of chymosin used in production cannot be determined.[54]
    FPC was the first artificially produced enzyme to be registered and allowed by the US Food and Drug Administration. FPC products have been on the market since 1990 and have been considered in the last 20 years the ideal milk-clotting enzyme.[55] In 1999, about 60% of US hard cheese was made with FPC[56] and it has up to 80% of the global market share for rennet.[57] By 2008, approximately 80% to 90% of commercially made cheeses in the US and Britain were made using FPC.[54] Today, the most widely used Fermentation-Produced Chymosin (FPC) is produced either by the fungus Aspergillus niger and commercialized under the trademark CHY-MAX®[58] by the Danish company Chr. Hansen, or produced by Kluyveromyces lactis and commercialized under the trademark MAXIREN®[59] by the Dutch company DSM."

    Doesnt the heat destroy the enzymes or is it a allergenic protein not affected by heat?
     
  5. OP
    BaconBits

    BaconBits Member

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    Re: What did Ray Peat meant about the horrible enzymes in ch

    I did a little research and I can say this are weird times we live in. Almost all cheese producers want to be vegetarian friendly, isnt that nice. They are proud to say they dont use animal rennet. So instead of animal rennet you get toxic GMO bacteria or fungi made enzymes, but hey, its vegetarian.


    But too bad Ray Peat didnt elaborate on this subject more. I mean you have to use bacteria, rennet only curdles the milk, if no bacteria is used all the cheese would taste and smell the same. You cant just use rennet and no bacteria. Then there would be no Swiss cheese or Edam, it would just be one cheese.
     
  6. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    Re: What did Ray Peat meant about the horrible enzymes in ch

    I'm pretty much convinced the only way to be safe is making our own - at least for those of us in North America. I've read that most European cheese is still made with animal rennet, but that may not be accurate.

    For the adventurous, this could be fun.

    New England Cheesemaking Supply Company
     
  7. OP
    BaconBits

    BaconBits Member

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    Re: What did Ray Peat meant about the horrible enzymes in ch

    So,thing is a little bit more complicated, there are 4 types of rennet like a found out

    1.traditonal rennet from 4 stomach of a veal(calf)
    2.microbial rennet from (non GMO) molds-it makes the cheese taste slightly bitter" BEING PHASED OUT"
    3.GMO rennet,also called FPC rennet- bovine genes were inserted into GMO mold
    4.Vegetable rennet- made from vegetables

    So the odds rennet number 2 is found is very low, number 3 is bad, what about number 4? Most companies in Europe use number 4, France and Austria (maybe even Denmark ) do not allow number 3.
     
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