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Ray Peat Email Advice Depository Discussion/Comment Thread

Discussion in 'Email Advice' started by j., Jan 14, 2013.

  1. Regina

    Regina Member

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    It's not my place to further elaborate on his concerns.
     
  2. John Frusciante

    John Frusciante Member

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    @haidut, he dislikes flying due to it being uncomfortable, not for safety reasons. He went to Europe in 1968 by ship.
     
  3. raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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    Part of me was surprised by Peats answers here, part of me wasn't. As I was reading through his comments on fiber and the reference he provided, they often referenced oat bran, corn bran, guar, etc, never specifically mentioning vegetables. He has also talked about fiber in a positive light in regards to lowering estrogen. The only vegetables he seemed cautious about were green salads which are disgusting anyway, and bell peppers and tomatoes. These leaves a huge amount of vegetables, which he has said are "very good nutritionally" for us to eat.
     
  4. theLaw

    theLaw Member

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    I think Peat is constantly aware of how these vegetables compare nutritionally to other foods as we need a certain number of calories per day.

    Vegetables have been held up as the Holy-Grail of nutritional density for a long time in modern diets, but they usually fail to consider the whole picture including the macros.

    Not to mention that you have some foods like orange-marmalade or Cherimoyas that Ray refers to as "super-foods", which beat nearly every vegetable on pure nutritional density alone while also having carbs.

    Also important to consider that nobody cooks lettuce or basic salad greens. Just imagine how Ray would feel about potatoes if nobody ever cooked them.:eek::eek::eek:

    New Cocktail: the Scottish Dare - raw potato juice + whisky:nailbiting:
     
  5. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Are these odds for dying in any of these two accidents or simply experiencing one of them? For flying, the odds of experiencing one and dying in one are probably the same. Not many people survive plane crashes. For driving, I would like to see stats of experiencing a car accident and dying in one. I bet there is a big difference in those odds for car travel.
     
  6. Dhair

    Dhair Member

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    I see your point, but would it really make a difference in how you think about the safety aspect of flying when there is such a great disparity in the odds of actually losing your life in a plane crash vs. a car crash in the first place? There is also the issue of how we statistically define "car accident," which could vary from a simple fender bender with the neighbor to a head-on collision with a semi truck. Anyway, if we are strictly talking about fatalities, it is blatantly obvious that it's not statistically significant enough to rationally justify the anxiety.
     
  7. haidut

    haidut Member

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    I agree, and I think this is where most of the anxiety comes from - most people instinctively know that if a plane were to crash there have a very small chance of surviving. There is also the issue of perceived control. People think they have more control when they are in a car vs. not much in a plane. It is irrational but that's how human psychology works :):
    Btw, here is a popular news source listing car death risk in various states.
    https://www.thrillist.com/cars/nati...-us-state-the-most-dangerous-roads-in-america

    A 1/32,322 chance of dying in a car accident (I picked DC since it is the first one on the list) is lower than the lifetime risk of about 1/20,000 for dying in a plane crash. Am I missing something here? Maybe the card death stats are not lifetime risks, but I did not see anything in that article indicating that is the case.
     
  8. Wagner83

    Wagner83 Member

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    Does that include private and smaller planes? The odds of dying in a plane crash on big commercial airlines exist but for some reason I can't see why it would be higher than that of car crashes. Speaking of fatalities in car crashes, ending up on a wheel chair and/or not able to speak, move your limbs, use half of your brain, or being in a coma for ages and what not may suck big time. No offense meant to anyone but I don't know what I would choose between that and death. I think there's something about being in the air (nothing to grab, nothing solid to touch) that is not reassuring at all, immense altitude do not help. As you said it also sucks to know that once you're on the plane you have no use, you're in the hands of the pilot and the engines. Applauding pilots when they land properly is scary.
     
  9. haidut

    haidut Member

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    I don't know if they made a distinction between large and small plane crashes. Maybe somebody can dig this info up. Not trying to convince people against flying. Obviously, in modern times crossing large distances as a middle-class citizen with limited time/money is only feasible with a plane. I am just trying to find out if flying is being advertised/pushed as a lot safer than it actually is. Typically, when the government wants to promote a certain industry it will openly lie about safety and risks.
     
  10. Wagner83

    Wagner83 Member

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    Ok but I doubt they can cover large commercial planes crashes, we hear a lot about those when they happen.
     
  11. Regina

    Regina Member

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    Yea, how about instead of perceived control, we think of it (say, driving) as having more of a sense of agency. From the moment you leave your home until you get to your destination, you are held hostage to the group.
     
  12. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Do you mean flying or driving makes you more of a hostage to the group?
     
  13. theLaw

    theLaw Member

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    Wouldn't you be in the plane far less time than the car? More time you spend in a automobile must increase your chances of death right?
     
  14. Dhair

    Dhair Member

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    Smaller planes absolutely crash more frequently than the larger commercial planes. I don't think I would feel comfortable regularly flying on anything smaller than an MD-80.
     
  15. goodandevil

    goodandevil Member

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    Q: "Does the adrenal gland require thyroid/vit a for steroid production? Im wondering, if hypothyroidism prevents cholesterol conversion, does that also apply to the adrenal gland and its stress hormones? Thx."

    Ray: "In extreme hypothyroidism, that can develop, but usually low thyriod function will massively reduce the formation of pregnenolone, progesterone, and DHEA, without decreasing the quantity of cortisol and aldosterone produced."
     
  16. Regina

    Regina Member

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    Flying. TSA, gate changes, stuck on tarmac, delays, baggage claim, discomfort.....
    With driving, you can alter the plan as you go in an exploratory way.
     
  17. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Fully agree. Never felt so herdy as when embarking on a flight trip. Other than to opt out of the body scans, there is not much else you can choose to do. I understand the necessity for all of these procedures but the whole experience reminds me of the clip to the Pink Floyd song "The Wall", even though that one was about the educational system and not the airlines.
     
  18. dfspcc20

    dfspcc20 Member

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    Most average Joe citizens spend a lot more of their lives in automobiles than in airplanes. Are the stats normalized for that?
    Don't know if it exists, but interesting stat to see would be something comparing casualty rates of commercial pilots vs, say, semi-truck or taxi drivers. Compare two groups of people who spend a lot of time in their respective vehicles.
     
  19. haidut

    haidut Member

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    You raise a very interesting and very valid point. Just Googling "death rate of pilots" brings back this as number one result.
    America's most dangerous jobs - Sep. 23, 2005

    As you can see pilots are second only to loggers (with the same death rate actually), and much higher than truck drivers (truck drivers are at #9 and taxi drivers at #10). Screenshot attached.

    death_rates_by_occupation.png
     
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