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Bacterias In The Nerve, Still Possible To Do Something?

Discussion in 'Oral Health' started by Xisca, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. Xisca

    Xisca Member

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    As I do not want root canal, should I decide for extracting the tooth? The decay reached the nerve, and the pain is slowly extending, and gives me sensitive teeth around. It is the big further last lower mollar. Big extraction then, and will need antibiotics...

    If I have to take one, which do you advise to not ruin my guts?

    Apart from clove oil, and rinsing with xylitol and using coconut oil, what else can help?

    Is it possible to heal a tooth when the nerve is touched?

    Thanks
     
  2. OP
    Xisca

    Xisca Member

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    My mother got long time ago this specific strep that goes to the heart, so I can guess I have the same strain as her....
     
  3. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    maybe packing it with sugar or honey a few times a day would take the infection away.

    I would try it.

    Also, T3 topical can be very helpful.
     
  4. OP
    Xisca

    Xisca Member

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    Are you kidding, I got more than 10 decays thanks to eating honey, after having been years off sugar and off decays. My only decays before, came from the time I was using fruits and fructose.

    Bacterias are all too happy with sugar to eat! Thus the success of xylitol rinse....
     
  5. HDD

    HDD Member

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    Carrot salad might help. My husband and I have taken bacteriophages for tooth pain. , We’ve used Florassist and Floraphage, both have worked.
     
  6. LeeLemonoil

    LeeLemonoil Member

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    Clove oil is highly estrogenic (eugenol!), use oregano-oil or wintergreen instead.
    Yu'll likely won't get rid of the infection, th bacteia form zysts, pockets deep inside the tissue. Extract and get over with, no need for antibotics necessarily
     
  7. Arnold Grape

    Arnold Grape Member

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    I'm facing a similar situation rn, and what you're recommending is extracting the tooth in lieu of taking antibiotics? -FYI, extraction, in many cases, will include an x-ray.
     
  8. schultz

    schultz Member

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    The best essential oils for producing a consistent oral bactericidal effect (from the studies I've looked, and against specific caries causing bacteria) are: Clove oil, Oregano oil, Cinnamon Oil, Lemongrass Oil, Lime Oil.

    It is quite possible some of these are estrogenic (as mentioned above) but I would personally be more concerned with the tooth.

    Another antibacterial substance is monolaurin. It even has positive effects on the teeth when consumed in the diet. One study added 2% to the diet and noted a significant reduction in caries and plaque reduction.

    Ive seen a paper using topical tetracycline applied twice a day to the teeth having beneficial effects. I think there is some risk of staining with tetracycline however. This might not bother you since the tooth is at the back.

    Youre problem seems to be pretty bad though (the way you describe it). Personally I would apply silver diamine fluoride to the area. It would likely only take a drop or less so the amount of fluoride would be kept quite low. It does cause the dentine to turn black (a reaction of the silver) The black reaction can be stopped with an application of potassium iodide shortly after the applications of the SDF. You'd be left with a light yellow stain instead of a black stain.

    Supplemental thyroid could possibly protect against the fluoride (if it prevents the fluoride from being taken up by the thyroid?) Someone else may be able to chime in.

    Silver diamine fluoride also helps with hypersensitivity. Seems like a better solution than pulling the tooth in my opinion but it might depend on the depth of the carious lesion.
     
  9. pinacolada

    pinacolada Member

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    Frankincense Fresh Truth ToothPaste - Living Libations

    Organic Ingredients:
    Cocos nucifera (Virgin Coconut), Sodium Bicarbonate, Saponified Olea europaea (Olive) Oil, Boswellia carterii (Frankincense), Commiphora myrrha (Myrrh), Mentha peperita (Peppermint), Thymus vulgaris linalool (Sweet Thyme), Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree), and MSM.

    Maybe you could make something like this with oregano oil? Also I use Dr. tung ionic toothbrush and whenever I stopped using it my teeth felt less clean.
     
  10. Seleniodine

    Seleniodine Member

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    Hi there Xisca, has the tooth had any work done on it? Crown or fillings? Has the tooth become infected from a crack or unfilled cavity?

    Based on your description it sounds like you have an infection that may be spreading in your jaw. This could be a risky situation which dentists would say requires prompt action to avoid additional damage. If you want to try and keep the tooth , then a round of antibiotics may be a way to "reset" the situation in the short term so that you can stay on top of it and try and prevent a re-infection.

    Some unconventional ideas to try would be laser (LLLT) treatment both red and near infra red spectrum directly on the tooth and gum line around it. Various threads and links on the forum to read up on , some external web links with specific experiments on gums and teeth.
    This could be helpful to keep things under control when there is only a very slight bacteria problem , but may not be enough to knock out a serious infection on it's own.

    Also worth trying ; a tincture of Pau D'arco may be swished onto the tooth to keep subsequent re-infection at bay after antibiotics.

    Extraction may be inevitable though if there is a continual pathway to re-infection or a pocket under the tooth that the antibiotics can't quite get rid of.

    Skipping the root canal is a good option but then you will have to consider the impact of losing a chewing tooth, other teeth shifting around over time due to the missing tooth and also the cosmetic issues.
    Then there is the implant question , which is another whole topic and fraught with potential problems.
     
  11. Janelle525

    Janelle525 Member

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    If you had those calcium therapy disks you might be able to save the tooth, but at this point get in the antibiotic and weigh your options quickly. Even diagnosed my husband's tooth abscess could wait 1.5 weeks for root canal as long as he was on an antibiotic and the pain went away, which it did. He still has to have it done though. You don't want a jaw infection!
     
  12. tara

    tara Member

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    I have had root canals and extractions.
    I've had a root canals that went badly and had to be redone 3 times. No fun. I've also had a couple that went well the first time.
    I've had extractions that went fine and that I've not regretted yet. Those teeth did not have much left to repair.

    I've not needed antibiotics for either.
    But I know that for people who have some kinds of heart issues, dental work that breaches the gums can push bacteria into the system that can be dangerous to the heart, and that antibiotics can be an important way to protect against that. If I were in that situation, I would take the advice to use antibiotics.

    I believe people can sometimes repair small cavities with various approaches, but I have not done so myself. I don't know if it is possible once it gets into the nerve.

    Is yours diagnosed by a dentist, or just by your own subjective feeling of pain? Sometimes there can be pain and sensitivity before the damage has become irreparable.
    If the dentist says you need root canal or extraction, I would be surprised if it is at a level you can repair - you probably have to choose the lesser evil for yourself. But I am not expert in this. I personally wouldn't want to let it get too much worse.
     
  13. A.R

    A.R Member

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    Can't believe no ones mentioned vitamin k2 yet?
     
  14. tara

    tara Member

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    I expect vit K is helpful for tooth health, and may assist in repair of small cavities. Any evidence it can deal with infections in the nerve/root?
     
  15. A.R

    A.R Member

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    From personal experience I've found vitamin k very helpful for tooth nerve pain. After aspirins harsh effects on my existing cavity, I was forced to get a filling done because the cavity increased in size, revealing the nerves below - so the dentist told me.

    I still get the nerve pain depending on endotoxin load from time to time, and vitamin k always helps.
     
  16. BigYellowLemon

    BigYellowLemon Member

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    Refined coconut oil rinses, salt water rinses, topical brushing of the area, topical sodium hypochlorite (clorox, dab a cotton swab in it and rub the area, should kill absolutely everything), sodium acetate (add baking soda to white vinegar until bubbling stops, and then boil down until concentrated, very effective anti-microbial and PH neutral), sodium citrate (do the same thing with lemon juice as you do with the vinegar).

    Try all these things. I would do them, then after a couple of minutes rinse down the area until it's clear, and then I would use raw honey (NOT sucrose) on the area.

    So basically brush teeth/gums/tongue/exposed nerve, try to remove all the plaque. Then do the coconut oil, sodium acetate/citrate, salt, baking soda, and boiled water all mixed together (with as little water as possible, you want this concentrated) and brush lightly with that, brushing heavily at the area (but not heavily enough to hurt tooth/nerve). Then let sit for like 10 minutes and rinse out. Then dab the area with a clorox dipped q-tip, and let sit for like a minute, then rinse. Then use honey right on the exposed nerve and let sit for 5-10 minutes, then rinse. Do this maybe 3 times a day? My only concern would be damaged the nerve tissue.

    The reason honey and not sucrose/white sugar is because your cells can't break down sucrose directly (as far as I know). But honey, being free glucose and fructose, should be able to directly feed your nerves. Both of them should have an anti-septic effect in high concentrations.

    This is really all guesswork, but still might work.
     
  17. Westside PUFAs

    Westside PUFAs Member

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    You have irreversible pulpitis. If you don't want a root canal then the only choice is to extract. Once the nerve is infected it is impossible to reverse it. All claims made online about healing this are snake oil nonsense. Don't believe me then just try their nonsense yourself and see if it works. It doesn't. If you don't extract the tooth eventually the root will become infected which can kill you. You don't need to take antibiotics when you have a tooth extracted. You only need them if it gets infected to the point of an abcess. After the extraction, don't do anything that will give you dry socket.
     
  18. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    I am not so sure. And I wonder how you can be so sure. It puzzles me that someone is so certain of an opinion like this. Without any real basis, because you cannot *know* for sure you are right. Sigh.

    In fact, if you do not get it treated, it does not result in death. It results in pain and then root resorption and the pain goes away. Prisoners for instance have long had these problems and the body figures out how to deal with it. It is painful though.

    I think this can be salvaged in some cases, I just can't believe it is so irreversible.
     
  19. tara

    tara Member

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    I'm not 100% sure either that it would always lead to death, but I think it can be quite risky. It is hard to get into the root canals - both with the body's own circulation, and to apply anything from the outside. So it's really hard to stop the infection raging relatively unhindered, even if you try to apply strong anti-microbials, or even if you boost the body's immune defenses strongly. Some of the typical mouth bacteria in there can have some nasty effects - both anti-metabolic and potentially life-threatening. I know someone who nearly died of bacteria that most likely originated from oral infection. Fortunately, strong systemic antibiotics were brought to bear in time, but not before significant permanent organ damage was done - and it was only by luck that it was not more severe.

    Still, I guess one could get a second opinion, and/or try other methods for a little while.

    The area of doubt that I have would be around diagnosis. If the diagnosis is based on pain, I know that teeth can get really sensitive long before the infection has really got into the nerve. Super-sensitive teeth can sometimes be reversed. But if there is a definite cavity that's eaten through the outer layers into the pulp and nerve, then I don't know about anyone actually resolving it without root filling or extraction.
     
  20. achillea

    achillea Member

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