Pressure Cooker VS. "Regular" Boiling To Make Gelatin

Discussion in 'Broth, Stocks' started by DMF, May 22, 2015.

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  1. DMF

    DMF Member

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    When does the intense heat of a pressure cooker start to "ruin" bone broth's chance of gelling as opposed to it remaining liquid when refridgerated? I've tried pressure cookers as well as reglar large pots to boil but get mixed results. Is a long "moderate" boil in a pot, 12-24 hours better than quick intense spurts in a pressure cooker better at "drawing out" gelatin?
     
  2. YuraCZ

    YuraCZ Member

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    Low temp for longer time is better for sure..
     
  3. tara

    tara Member

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    I don't think Peat recommends boiling broths for more than about 2-3 hours. Don't want too much of the bone itself to dissolve, and don't want the proteins too badly denatured from very long boiling.
     
  4. jyb

    jyb Member

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    I keep reading that pressure cooker (crockpot) is much much better for getting a high gelatin broth compared to a slow-cooker (just simmering water). Like 1 hour instead of 48+ hours...
     
  5. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    Pressure cooker and crockpot/slow cookers aren't the same. And both are different from stove top broth making with a regular stock pot.

    Source
     
  6. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Yes well I meant pressure cooker versus slow cooker or simmering for cooking various beef cuts, especially gelatinous cuts or bones.
     
  7. Aspekt

    Aspekt Member

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    I pressure cook on high for 50 minutes with my electric pressure cooker. If there's plenty of cartilage and connective tissue it can be a solid chunk of set liquid once it's cooled. usually I can only get beef bones without much gelatin so it's not as thick. generally I roast the bones first to get the browned flavour, then throw in some onions, celery, some fresh herbs and salt, then a bit of vinegar which supposedly helps draw calcium out into the broth. I wonder if the shorter cooking time than a slow cooker reduces the amount of histamine?
     
  8. tara

    tara Member

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    I stopped putting vinegar in when cooking broth when I read Peat on lead accumulating in bones - he does not consider it that safest source of calcium, if I've understood right.
    Good question about whether you more histamine from longer cooking or higher temps.
     
  9. CameCumm

    CameCumm New Member

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    I think when it come to a Pressure Cooker. You should give it a low temperature.
     
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