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Observations After A Few Months Of Consuming Sugar

Discussion in 'Blood Sugar' started by stargazer1111, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. stargazer1111

    stargazer1111 Member

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    This is all anecdotal and non-scientific.

    However, I have noticed trends with regard to my blood glucose readings. I have always struggled with breakfast. Too much starch at breakfast leads to severe hypoglycemia in between meals later in the day (presumably because it results in a state of hyperinsulinemia). However, the same amount of starch for dinner causes no such problem overnight. What is fascinating is that consuming more sucrose (whether from fruit or soda) with breakfast while consuming a little less starch actually improves my glucose numbers later in the day.

    I never get reactive hypoglycemia from sugar. I only get reactive hypoglycemia from starch.

    Also, I have begun consuming a special icing I found that is comprised of coconut oil, palm oil, and powdered sugar along with some soda before bed. My fasting glucose in the morning tends to go down from the mid-80s to the mid-70s when I consume this.

    The overall trend appears to be that consuming a fair amount of sugar (I mean sugar, not starch) is leading to an overall improvement in glucose tolerance. I get probably 100-150 grams of sugar on top of about 100 grams of carbs from starch. I keep my PUFA intake carefully at 6 grams per day which is at the 2% of calories cutoff above which the body begins oxidizing PUFA for energy which leads to all of its toxic effects.

    My diet is comprised of:

    Lean chicken breast (I have a lot of food allergies and most red meat causes problems; this chicken breast has virtually no fat so no PUFA issues)
    Large amounts of coconut oil at each meal
    Caffeine-free Mexican sodas (caffeine causes problems for me)
    White potatoes
    White rice
    Coconut/palm-based icing
    Macadamia nuts (in moderation)
    Occasionally blueberry smoothies

    This seems to be slowly improving my health. The improvement is slow in coming, but every day I feel a little closer to the way I did when I was 18 before all this mess. Notice the absence of vitamin A. This is the longest I have gone with a very low vitamin A intake in my entire life and I do believe that this has a lot to do with my progressively improving health. Based on my studies of vitamin A for the past year (I'm talking academically, not just searching the internet), I (along with a few other researchers) have tentatively come to the conclusion that people in the western world are generally overdosing on vitamin A and that this may be responsible for a number of issues, including autoimmunity.
     
  2. Tenacity

    Tenacity Member

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    I'm curious, what's your evidence for this claim?
     
  3. OP
    stargazer1111

    stargazer1111 Member

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    Redacted for confidentiality.
     
  4. anqele

    anqele Member

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    Since the 90’s I’ve been using the strongest vitamin A prescription creams going, prescribed tretinoin and retinoic acid that is "100 times" as potent as the retinol-containing products sold without prescription.

    Am healthy and the only side effect is good skin so with all due respect I disagree.
     
  5. OP
    stargazer1111

    stargazer1111 Member

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    That's simply an anecdote and is not relevant scientifically, just as my anecdote that sugar is healthy is also not relevant scientifically.

    You could be an exception to the rule. From what I have read in the literature, there is a wide variation in a person's ability to handle vitamin A. For instance, I took doses smaller and for less time than those typically said to cause hypervitaminosis A, yet I developed hypervitaminosis A anyway.

    The people who succumb to the diseases that I think are caused by chronically ingesting too much vitamin A simply have a reduced capacity for dealing with the excess compared to others like you.
     
  6. raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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    How would you explain the vast amounts of people that benefit from eating things such as liver or taking vitamin A supplements? I know there is more than vitamin A in liver, but surely if it was so bad, people wouldn't be getting benefits?
     
  7. Prosper

    Prosper Member

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    Such a "vast amount" of people must seem considerably smaller when contrasted to the total amount of people being exposed to synthetic forms of A in milk and other common products to which it is added to. While a significant amount of people would respond positively to any vitamin or mineral you pick, these people are almost never the majority. When practically everyone is exposed to repeated high doses of a nutrient, it is bound to cause a wave of undesirable consequences. For just as there are those who are deficient in a certain nutrient, there are those who are overloaded in it.

    Skin creams are irrelevant in a discussion about dietary A, as one of the main problems with excessive A is liver toxicity. While orally ingested A goes straight to the liver, transdermally absorbed A wanders in the bloodstream first.
     
  8. fradon

    fradon Member

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    when i feel stuffed for like my metabolism is sluggish i start eating pure can sugar and its kicks start my digestion.
     
  9. bistecca

    bistecca Member

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    powdered sugar contains, i believe raw starch of some sort. typically corn starch. I generally try to avoid raw starch and stick to wet cooked(boiled/steamed) starches, with preference given to sugar.
     
  10. benaoao

    benaoao Member

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    So low blood glucose is high insulin production, I’d be wary of years of pancreas overload. You’re definitely insulin sensitive for now.

    HbA1c, fasted insulin and igf-1 give a much better picture.
     
  11. chrismturner89

    chrismturner89 Member

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    I am very sensitive to vitamin a. It causes my hair to look thinner and i start to develop dermatitis/fungal issues. Could you elaborate on what kind of diseases and the mechanism behind vitamin a causing them?
     
  12. jet9

    jet9 Member

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    interesting experience, as i understand you eat most of your starch for dinner, right? did you try going completely starch free?
     
  13. Runenight201

    Runenight201 Member

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    This is also a calcium deficient diet
     
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