Iron Chelation

Discussion in 'Messtafarian' started by messtafarian, Sep 8, 2013.

  1. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    ah no.

    I wouldn't necessarily do this either, but wet cupping (aka hijama) is another option.

    I had fire cupping done once but didn't notice any significant improvements at the time, but my diet was a mess then.

    Wet Cupping or ‘Hijama’: The Ancient Art of Healing
     
  2. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Well, looks like we have a winner here. :)

    [BBvideo 560,340:yufwlfw9]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3RkW8FOYN8g[/BBvideo]

    It seems great because one can do it on any part of the body, and doesn't require puncturing ( = damaging) a vein.

    If one can draw at least 250 ml on the same spot, that's a keeper.
     
  3. Peata

    Peata Member

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    Wow, I've truly seen everything now.

    Pros - Looks simple enough once you get the cupping device (could use diabetic lancets probably). If cup is reusable or inexpensive, that would save money, but it seems like you'd want to get a new, sterile one each time.

    Cons - I would probably get permanent scarring from it.

    It would be interesting to hear from someone on the forum if they try any of these methods. Let us know your experiences/adventures.
     
  4. Peata

    Peata Member

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    I thought about those leeches again today.
     
  5. haidut

    haidut Member

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    There is no need for using leeches, although if someone is feeling up to it by all means go for it:):
    To chelate iron you can use commonly available supplements like aspirin and thiamine (vitamin B1). I believe Ray Peat has written about aspirin lowering iron, and as far as thiamine is concerned just use Google or PubMed and search for "thiamine iron chelation" or "benfotiamine iron chelation" or "fursultiamine iron chelation". Of the three thiamines, the last one (also known TTFD) is what seems to work best since it has 2 sulphur atoms. However, I've seen studies saying the other thiamine analogs work as well. I am too tired to search for studies right now, but anyone interested can easily find them using Google and/or PubMed.
    Incidentally, there are a LOT of studies on using thiamine for lead and/or aluminum chelation (lowering both metals Ray would recommend I think) and in fact it is approved as such chelator in some European countries.
     
  6. Peata

    Peata Member

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    Interesting, as I just started supplementing with B1 recently.
     
  7. johns74

    johns74 Member

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    Important Preface: I'm not knowledgeable about this subject, but it seems important to explore the idea of removing iron. Hope others will expand/criticize some points.

    50 ml might be enough. You could do that once every four days, and in little more than a month you would have removed 500 ml. Doing it this way, with smaller amounts at a time, means that your hemoglobin doesn't drastically drop like in a 500 ml donation. After one 50 ml extraction, it drops a little, but because it recovers between the 4-day-spaced sessions, it never becomes nearly as low as with a 500 ml donation, letting you feel better and avoid the fatigue some people feel after giving 500 ml of blood. But in the end, you still remove about the same amount of iron. You could even do it once every 7 days, that would result in a removal of about 200 ml per month.

    What I want to ask the experts here, is doing 10 extractions of 50 ml in 40 days too tough on your veins?

    Another thing one could do to increase removal of toxins other than iron is having a raw carrot 30 minutes before the extraction, because that moves toxins from the gallbladder to the blood (toxins accumulate in the gallbladder, the carrot triggers the release of bile from the gallbladder, some of the toxins are excreted but a part is reabsorbed, which goes back to the blood which will be extracted).

    Another possible advantage that should be explored is whether the big 500 ml extraction triggers a higher absorption of iron for days or weeks after the extraction.
     
  8. Milky

    Milky Member

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    Someone on another topic mentioned flossing your teeth more often.
     
  9. YuraCZ

    YuraCZ Member

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    Are you serious? It really isn't that hard lol. Everything what you need is fat needle, infusion tube and some disinfection. Alcohol swab. If I can do it. Everybody can do it...
     

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  10. nullredvector

    nullredvector Member

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    Lol Haidut used to get tired :P
     
  11. tankasnowgod

    tankasnowgod Member

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    If you are anemic, you should not donate blood, period. Furthermore, no competent doctor would give you a prescription for a therapeutic phlebotomy. If your hemoglobin isn't high enough, you can run into some very serious problems very quickly by losing blood.

    Having said that, there are several conditions where anemia can happen even when body iron stores are high. Some are fairly serious (like thalessemia and sickle cell), and some are fairly easily corrected. For example, pernicious anemia can be resolved by a B complex or B12 tablets.

    If you're suffering from anemia, you should figure out what kind, and treat that. If you are interested in lowering iron, you should first confirm that your iron is high by testing hemoglobin, TSAT and ferritin.

    If you do have one of the more serious anemias that the B vitamins can't resolve, and you also have high iron stores, you will probably have to undergo chelation therapy.
     
  12. Pet Peeve

    Pet Peeve Member

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    Damn, you really are dedicated to good health. I'm studying to become a nurse so I might get there myself sometime, but holy moly
     
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