INCREDIBLE Jack Kruse Interview

Lutzzy

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@SOMO I'll give a slight rebutel. He was very fat before this so even when you lose a ton of weight those last few pounds probably are going to be stubborn. Having said that, he had gained weight by the time that video came out. He claims it's due to night shift and bio hacks. Dubious but I do think night shift will **** your sh*t up.

How do you know he lied about taking MRSA? It's suspicious how he hasn't seemed to set it up with proof that he did it however wim hoff did something similar in a scientific experiment so it seems to work.

Also the no pain killer surgery, I'm not sure if it is legit or not but it's definitely believable. Very cold temperatures get rid of pain quick in my experience.
People who work night shifts are defiantly affected as it is hard to sleep in the day time and if your schedule changes often like my brother's changed every month and it was 3 til 11 or 11 til 7 or 8 til 3 or relief which gave the afternoon shift a 2 day break and the guy with midnight's 2 days off and one day for Sunday....As the water department was never closed like the fire dept or police...Most all of the employees had many health problems. The best hospital was a hospital in Virginia Beach and it was Oceanside and had great food and grounds for sunbathers , funny now hospital rooms have no sunshine only fluorescent lights and blue light televisions and the people often get more infections in the hospitals...We spend more on health care than any other country and have the worst health.....Heat has been used to kill cancer.....cold reduces swelling and pain and now there are cold therapies to lose fat just like plastic surgeons and stomach staplers...A pill for every ill and a guru on every corner to fix all your problems with their magic cure for your $$$$$$. Kruse has not asked for any money and offers his research on you tube for free.
 

Lutzzy

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That's a redundant acronym; let me try again: What is the frequency range commonly employed during magnetic resonance medical imaging?
I do know that the air force uses Hyperbaric oxygen therapy with great results and my Mom was burned with an x ray machine in the Greenville Hospital. I know there has to be a steel wall between x ray rooms and other offices. Whether it is a Ct scan or MRI or x ray the technician is never in the room with you which gives me enough doubts to their safety. The sounds are very frightening in these rooms...
 

Travis

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People who work night shifts are defiantly affected as it is hard to sleep in the day time and if your schedule changes often like my brother's changed every month and it was 3 til 11 or 11 til 7 or 8 til 3 or relief which gave the afternoon shift a 2 day break and the guy with midnight's 2 days off and one day for Sunday....As the water department was never closed like the fire dept or police...Most all of the employees had many health problems. The best hospital was a hospital in Virginia Beach and it was Oceanside and had great food and grounds for sunbathers , funny now hospital rooms have no sunshine only fluorescent lights and blue light televisions and the people often get more infections in the hospitals...We spend more on health care than any other country and have the worst health.....Heat has been used to kill cancer.....cold reduces swelling and pain and now there are cold therapies to lose fat just like plastic surgeons and stomach staplers...A pill for every ill and a guru on every corner to fix all your problems with their magic cure for your $$$$$$. Kruse has not asked for any money and offers his research on you tube for free.

There are many good studies on cancer and clock genes. [With just a few of them below:]

Stevens, Richard G. "Circadian disruption and breast cancer: from melatonin to clock genes." Epidemiology (2005)

Haus, Erhard. "Biological clocks and shift work: circadian dysregulation and potential long-term effects." Cancer causes & control (2006)

Davis, Scott. "Circadian disruption, shift work and the risk of cancer: a summary of the evidence and studies in Seattle." Cancer causes & control (2006)

Haus, Erhard L. "Shift work and cancer risk: potential mechanistic roles of circadian disruption, light at night, and sleep deprivation." Sleep medicine reviews (2013)

The expression of clock genes oscillates periodically through a cycle approximating 24 hours. In total darkness and without melatonin, this will still occur yet the the cycle slightly prolongs to ~25 hours. Without periodic restimulation of light and/or melatonin,. the clock gene cycle will lose amplitude and fade.

Cryptochrome is one such clock gene, and it analogues in plants transcribe dNA in response to light. 'Officially,' this only occurs in humans in the retina and surprachiasmic nucleus; the rest of the body is assumed too dark. The clock gene RORβ is a melatonin receptor under negative control of retinoic acid, another high-affinity ligand. Through these transcription factors melatonin and light can both entrain the clock cycle, leading to the expression of many downstream enzymes and structural proteins.

Although industrialists, slavedrivers, and their paid foreman would would have scoffed at the idea that nocturnal work could lead to negative health effects—a few centuries ago—it is now known to be biologically plausible and supported by data.
 

mt_dreams

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You might as well accept it. We need cellphones to fully function. Not only that, but you're saturated all day with EMR from cellphone towers, radio stations, television broadcasts, WiFi, and the sun.

I don't think accepting it is the best option. there's things that can be done to drastically improve ones situation. If you're going to carry your cell phone on you, it should be in airplane mode most of the time. turn it off airplane mode only when it can be a couple of feet away from you. I get that for some this just wont work, but its doable for many people that are just too lazy to change their ways. if you are using it to talk, just use wired air ear plugs, or are the very least, bluetooth. don't sleep with it next to your bed, or at the very least put it on airplane mode. try to limit usage when phone is not in full range. the list goes on and on. Many people from the 80s got cancer 10-20 years later, and it's a fact. they've minimized the cancer % since then, but it still happens. Like smoking, you can pretend it's not a reality, that is until it happens to someone in your circle. even then, they can probably blame it on something else to allow the addiction to continue.

tv signal can be easily wired for most areas, especially urban. yes the fm radio station signals are not optimal, but they are not in the same category as cell radiation. i dont think the suns radiation pulses at the speed and variance of electric devises. turn ur wifi off when you're not using it. In my previous condo, I was getting hit with over 30 signals, so this is one that one must unfortunately accept depending on situation unless you desire moving or spending on protection. cell towers are a catch 22, you can't stop them going up. on the plus side they at least improve cell signal which helps on an individual basis. hopefully you can be at least a mile away from them. you don't need to go full amish, just be smart about it.
 

Ras

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That's a redundant acronym; let me try again: What is the frequency range commonly employed during magnetic resonance medical imaging?
Forgive me, but I'm not entirely sure what you mean. Frequency of what? Is another way to phrase your question: At what bandwidths do [we] scan?
 

Ras

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By the way the first guy that used x ray practiced on himself and dissolved his bones, the next guy used his data and practiced on animals and got the credit for invention. There used to x ray machines in J C Penney and sears to see if your child was curling up their toes to get a new pair of shoes that were too small disappeared when they discovered the radiation..... But you always have to consider that most of the studies done on cell phones are done by or paid for by cell phone sellers or makers........ There are so many places with WiFi and LiFi now that everyone is exposed by cell towers and the cordless phone in your house and the computerized gadgets with GPS like your fit bit bracelet, your help me I have fallen device , oh my gosh we have been invaded with high frequency waves...............A New Type of Li-Fi Has Reportedly Cracked 40 Gbps, 100 Times Faster Than The Best Wi-Fi
Researching device implant safety compliance testing for MRI is a good way to get a broad comprehension of the effects of radiofrequency energy on natural and artificial materials; to clear patients that have implants, we use MagResource, which requires a log-in. So instead, you could peruse Shellock's blovious MRISafety; Frank G. Shellock "is" MRI safety. The RF energy of your cellphone is Bruce Banner compared with the Hulk that is exercised during a 3T scan; the hyperT (>7 Tesla) research magnets are Worldbreaker Hulk. The gradient excitation pulses during our DWI sequences are so powerful that you feel it through the floor. Bending your head near the bore - the area of greatest Lenz forces - produces a metallic feeling on the tongue.
 

Ras

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I do know that the air force uses Hyperbaric oxygen therapy with great results and my Mom was burned with an x ray machine in the Greenville Hospital. I know there has to be a steel wall between x ray rooms and other offices. Whether it is a Ct scan or MRI or x ray the technician is never in the room with you which gives me enough doubts to their safety. The sounds are very frightening in these rooms...
Our 640-slice Toshiba can Bremsstrahlung your atomies, but the technologist (the technician is the person that services the machine) is out of the room not so much because of the scatter-danger of one scan, but because we do >30 scans a day for decades. Nuclear techs are around their patients for hours a day, and their badges still register puny doses. Howbeit any amount of radiation (linear, no threshhold) is harmful. And for an MRI, the tech is out of the room because he must operate the computer that controls the scanner, and such things are not permitted in Zone 4.

What sounds frighten you? I can explain what they are and why they happen, and things are not so frightening once we understand them.
 

Travis

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Forgive me, but I'm not entirely sure what you mean. Frequency of what? Is another way to phrase your question: At what bandwidths do [we] scan?

All electromagnetic radiation from radio to UV light, and further, has an associated frequency. This is the periodicity of the wave—or the photon quantum spin for particle theorists—and is defined as oscillations per unit time, or Hertz. The frequency is more universal than the term 'bandwidth,' and has been used by physicists and chemists for centuries. However, merely knowing the wavelength or energy allows easy conversion through the Plank–Einstein Relation.

Do you really work in medical imaging?
 

Ras

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All electromagnetic radiation from radio to UV light, and further, has an associated frequency. This is the periodicity of the wave—or the photon quantum spin for particle theorists—and is defined as oscillations per unit time, or Hertz. The frequency is more universal than the term 'bandwidth,' and has been used by physicists and chemists for centuries. However, merely knowing the wavelength or energy allows easy conversion through the Plank–Einstein Relation.

Do you really work in medical imaging?
I do. But such knowledge needn't be retained after the registry and is unique to each scanner and sequence. Many of us, after graduating x-ray school, learn higher modalities on the job rather than attend another school. We then study for and pass the respective registry, and the knowledge purge begins. Most scanners run the show and the tech is required to do little. And as I've said before, the operating systems of many scanners - in particular, GE - don't reveal deeper information (e.g., SED, SAR, etc.) to the technologist. Philips I like, because it does tell you so much, howbeit most scans require little attention.

I happen to have taken this picture last Tuesday when we had a small error. You can see on the right a bit of the information I mentioned.IMAG1847.jpg
 

Travis

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de Pomerai, David. "Cell biology: Non-thermal heat-shock response to microwaves." Nature (2000)

'Exposure limits set for microwave radiation assume that any biological effects result from tissue heating: nonthermal effects have been reported but remain controversial. We show here that prolonged exposure to low-intensity microwave fields can induce heat-shock responses in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This effect appears to be non-thermal, suggesting that current exposure limits set for microwave equipment may need to be reconsidered.' ―de Pomerai

'Worms were exposed overnight to continuous-wave microwave radiation at 750 MHz and 0.5 W in the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell described previously.' ―de Pomerai

The 750·MHz frequency used by de Pomerai happens to be a popular frequency used in mobile telecommunications.

'A thermal explanation for this disparity would require that the exposed worms become 3 °C warmer than controls — or more if only a minority of worms/tissues is affected. We reject this thermal explanation on several grounds, [...] First, no temperature difference is detectable between control and exposed cultures after irradiation.' ―de Pomerai

'We suggest instead that the induction of heat-shock proteins described here could involve non-thermal mechanisms. These could include microwave disruption of the weak bonds that maintain the active folded forms of proteins; enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (known to be inducers of HSPs); or interference with cell-signalling pathways that affect HSP induction (by heat-shock-factor activation). All these mechanisms are testable using the functional genomic tools that are available in C. elegans. Because of the universality of the heat-shock response, a similar nonthermal induction might also occur in human tissues exposed to microwaves,' ―de Pomerai
 
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Ras

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de Pomerai, David. "Cell biology: Non-thermal heat-shock response to microwaves." Nature (2000)

'Exposure limits set for microwave radiation assume that any biological effects result from tissue heating: nonthermal effects have been reported but remain controversial. We show here that prolonged exposure to low-intensity microwave fields can induce heat-shock responses in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This effect appears to be non-thermal, suggesting that current exposure limits set for microwave equipment may need to be reconsidered.' ―de Pomerai

'Worms were exposed overnight to continuous-wave microwave radiation at 750 MHz and 0.5 W in the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell described previously.' ―de Pomerai
The 750·MHz frequency used by de Pomerai happens to be a popular frequency used in mobile telecommunications.

'A thermal explanation for this disparity would require that the exposed worms become 3 °C warmer than controls — or more if only a minority of worms/tissues is affected. We reject this thermal explanation on several grounds, [...] First, no temperature difference is detectable between control and exposed cultures after irradiation.' ―de Pomerai

'We suggest instead that the induction of heat-shock proteins described here could involve non-thermal mechanisms. These could include microwave disruption of the weak bonds that maintain the active folded forms of proteins; enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (known to be inducers of HSPs); or interference with cell-signalling pathways that affect HSP induction (by heat-shock-factor activation). All these mechanisms are testable using the functional genomic tools that are available in C. elegans. Because of the universality of the heat-shock response, a similar nonthermal induction might also occur in human tissues exposed to microwaves,' ―de Pomerai
I'll get some information from the scanner when I go to work Monday.
 

Travis

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Yakymenko, Igor. "Long-term exposure to microwave radiation provokes cancer growth: evidences from radars and mobile communication systems." Experimental Oncology (2011)

'International multiyear Interphone project conducted under the management of the World Health Organization and substantially supported by industry, was an interview-based case-control study with 2708 glioma and 2409 meningioma cases and matched controls, conducted in 13 countries using a common protocol. The results of study were rather controversial. For example, authors were forced to declare “a reduced odds ratio related to ever having been a regular mobile phone users was seen for glioma (OR 0.81) and meningioma (OR 0.79), possibly reflecting participation bias or other methodological limitations.” However, significantly increased risks of tumors development in “heavy” users of cell phones have been revealed in this study: for meningioma OR 4.8, for glioma OR 3.77, as compared with the matched controls. One thousand and six hundred forty hours per four years means about one hour per day of a cell phone use. In this connection we can point to our data that indicates amount of time which Ukrainian students spend talking via cell phones every day. Our findings indicated that more than a half of them spend over one hour per day, and more than a quarter of them spend over two hours per day talking via cell phones every day.
 

SB4

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@Travis Perhaps the increase in heat shock proteins in C. elegans could come from the down stream effects of activating voltage gated calcium channels? This would cause peroxynitrite.
 

Obi-wan

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You might as well accept it. We need cellphones to fully function. Not only that, but you're saturated all day with EMR from cellphone towers, radio stations, television broadcasts, WiFi, and the sun.
I did and had it in my pocket 8 hours every day for 20 years. Now I have advanced prostate cancer. I do not carry it in my pocket anymore. I think the big elephant in the room is in your pocket near your gonads...
 

sugarbabe

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I did and had it in my pocket 8 hours every day for 20 years. Now I have advanced prostate cancer. I do not carry it in my pocket anymore. I think the big elephant in the room is in your pocket near your gonads...
But many men get prostate cancer so how can we know without asking every man whether he did that?
 

Obi-wan

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But many men get prostate cancer so how can we know without asking every man whether he did that?
My urologist said the same thing...but nothing like preventative maintenance for a younger man
 

Lutzzy

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I do. But such knowledge needn't be retained after the registry and is unique to each scanner and sequence. Many of us, after graduating x-ray school, learn higher modalities on the job rather than attend another school. We then study for and pass the respective registry, and the knowledge purge begins. Most scanners run the show and the tech is required to do little. And as I've said before, the operating systems of many scanners - in particular, GE - don't reveal deeper information (e.g., SED, SAR, etc.) to the technologist. Philips I like, because it does tell you so much, howbeit most scans require little attention.

I happen to have taken this picture last Tuesday when we had a small error. You can see on the right a bit of the information I mentioned.View attachment 9985


My son had two stents 6/20/18 and now they want to do CT scan and other tests. At the hospital they had said no more tests for 3 months until the stents were healed or seated. Do you suggest that normally? He has had so many xrays and tests....He should glow in the dark.
 

Lutzzy

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I did and had it in my pocket 8 hours every day for 20 years. Now I have advanced prostate cancer. I do not carry it in my pocket anymore. I think the big elephant in the room is in your pocket near your gonads...


Dr Donald Carrow had a clinic in Clearwater and he wrapped people in heated blankets for cancer and brought their temperature up to close to 104 degrees and cured them with several treatments. Now they say just getting in a sauna or hot tub or steam room or hot car could cure cancer...with your bottle of water so you do not dehydrate......One says vinegar will kill most if not all cancers...Or you can go for the chemical poison and burn and cut it out maybe ...or change your diet like a millionaire in our town with 4th stage lung cancer who was my brother's childhood friend
 

Travis

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@Travis Perhaps the increase in heat shock proteins in C. elegans could come from the down stream effects of activating voltage gated calcium channels? This would cause peroxynitrite.

I don't think so, and the reason is because they had used frequency-modulated microwaves in those studies.

Jack Kruse in mostly vindicated in this regard because microwave-induced calcium flux has actually been a consistently finding. However: this only occurs with amplitude-modulate microwaves, and frequency-modulated microwaves have little effect. Nonthermic FM microwaves had even been thought inert decades ago when only the more salient changes could be observed, such as Ca²⁺ flux and ornithine decarboxylase activity.

ocd activity.png

Although Ca²⁺ flux is important, the ornithine decarboxylase also induced can be actually expected to cause cancer. Ornithine decarboxylase is the rate-limiting enzyme during the synthesis of polyamines, small molecular transcription catalysts that've been known to bind dNA since the '60s. Polyamines have been shown to lower the energy barrier of the B-dNA ⟶ Z-dNA transition, literally transforming the right-handed helix into a left-handed one. Polyamines so reliably catalyze replication that they can almost be considered to be small-molecule transcription factors, needing no activating ligand but enzymes to make them. Ornithine decarboxylase has been the one enzyme most consistently-associated with cancer, and polyamines are the reason why. Polyamines will reliably increase transcription rates in vitro during routine PCR, and they appear to explicitly transcribe 'housekeeping genes' having CpG islands. For this reason, I think Jack Kruse is correct yet also fails to emphasize the more relevant effect. [Although: the observed increased ornithine decarboxylase activity is correlated with Ca²⁺ changes, and to such an extent that some scientists have assumed this to be causal. The changes in Ca²⁺ flux proceed and stimulate the ornithine decarboxylase activity.]

ocd activity 2.png

The fact that only amplitude-modulate microwaves are capable of increasing ornithine decarboxylase activity explains perfectly the epidemiological data, otherwise hopelessly enigmatic. The first generation of mobile telecommunications had used frequency modulated microwaves, as had the third generation (3G) and all those subsequent (≥ 4G). It had only been the second generation of mobile telecommunication technology that had used AM waves, so you would actually expect to see data like this:

epi.png

The Hardell studies had been conducted between 2002–2005 in the Nordic Countries where cell phones had first gained popularity. The initial Nordic carrier wave had been 450·MHz microwave modulated by Fast Frequency Shift Keying (FFSK), a type of frequency-modulation. The second generation (2G) in Northern Europe had used this same 450·MHz frequency, yet amplitude-modulated, and had added the 800·MHz carrier frequency to keep-up with demand. This had been the GSM standard, and other regions had followed suit. The 800·MHz frequency as well as the 1800·MHz frequency are far more common today, while the peculiar 450·MHz frequency had always remained unique to the Nordic countries. The third generation (3G) had seen a universal reversion back to frequency-ξmodulated microwaves, with carrier frequencies of 700–800·MHz and 1800–1900·MHz are now used by over 90% of the World's mobile phone users.

modulation 2.png

Amplitude-modulated frequencies of 112·MHz, 438·MHz, 450·MHz, and 800·MHz have all been shown to have calcemic and enzymatic cellular effects. Ornithine decarboxylase activity had been induced by nonthermic field densities (1·mW·cm⁻²) comparable to those emitted by phones. This presumed carcinogenic effect also depends on both coherence time and modulation frequency, the latter of which is superimposed over the carrier frequency and encodes the spoken voice. For this reason, some speakers' voices could literally be more carcinogenic than others. A persons tone and volume cannot influence either the carrier frequency or modulation scheme, yet it is more-or-less synonymous with the modulation frequency.

modulation frequency.png

Coherence time also influences ornithine decarboxylase activity, meaning that having 'good reception' would have been especially dangerous to 2G users, while things like: mountainous terrain, valleys, and a low tower density could have been seen as protective. However: it is my contention that cell phones are no longer particularly carcinogenic because their waves are frequency-modulated, a view that I'd gathered from the articles listed below. I am also confident that should anyone read these studies they would come to more-or-less the same conclusion.

[1] Repacholi, M. "Systematic review of wireless phone use and brain cancer and other head tumors." Bioelectromagnetics (2012)
[2] Litovitz, T. "The role of coherence time in the effect of microwaves on ornithine decarboxylase activity." Bioelectromagnetics (1993)
[3] Toler, J. "Long-term, low-level exposure of mice prone to mammary tumors to 435 MHz radiofrequency radiation." Radiation research (1997)
[4] Yakymenko, I. "Long-term exposure to microwave radiation provokes cancer growth: evidences from radars and mobile communication systems." Experimental Oncology (2011)
[5] Byus, C. "Increased ornithine decarboxylase activity in cultured cells exposed to low energy modulated microwave fields and phorbol ester tumor promoters." Cancer research (1988)
[6] Paulraj, R. "Effect of amplitude modulated RF radiation on calcium ion efflux and ODC activity in chronically exposed rat brain." Indian journal of biochemistry & biophysics (1999)
[7] Adey, W. "Spontaneous and nitrosourea-induced primary tumors of the central nervous system in Fischer 344 rats exposed to frequency-modulated microwave fields." Cancer Research (2000)
[8] Hardell, L. "Pooled analysis of two case–control studies on use of cellular and cordless telephones and the risk for malignant brain tumours diagnosed in 1997–2003." International archives of occupational and environmental health (2006)
 
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