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Aspirin As An Antifungal Drug, Even Against Candida

haidut

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It seems that aspirin may be useful to people struggling with Candida problems. This study shows various concentrations of aspirin inhibiting fungal growth and even killing Candida.

http://aac.asm.org/content/48/1/41?ijke ... f_ipsecsha

"...In the present study, a catheter disk model system was used to investigate the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (all cyclooxygenase inhibitors) on biofilm formation by three strains of C. albicans. Seven of nine drugs tested at a concentration of 1 mM inhibited biofilm formation. Aspirin, etodolac, and diclofenac produced the greatest effects, with aspirin causing up to 95% inhibition. Celecoxib, nimesulide, ibuprofen, and meloxicam also inhibited biofilm formation, but to a lesser extent. Aspirin was active against growing and fully mature (48-h) biofilms; its effect was dose related, and it produced significant inhibition (20 to 80%) at pharmacological concentrations. Simultaneous addition of prostaglandin E2 abolished the inhibitory effect of 25 or 50 μM aspirin. At 1 mM, aspirin reduced the viability of biofilm organisms to 1.9% of that of controls. Surviving cells had a wrinkled appearance, as judged by scanning electron microscopy, and consisted of both yeasts and hyphae. Treatment with other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, such as etodolac, resulted in biofilms that consisted almost entirely of yeast cells. In conventional assays for germ tube formation, these drugs produced significant inhibition, whereas aspirin had little effect. Our findings suggest that cyclooxygenase-dependent synthesis of fungal prostaglandin(s) is important for both biofilm development and morphogenesis in C. albicans and may act as a regulator in these physiological processes. Our results also demonstrate that aspirin possesses potent antibiofilm activity in vitro and could be useful in combined therapy with conventional antifungal agents in the management of some biofilm-associated Candida infections."

http://femsyr.oxfordjournals.org/content/7/8/1207.long

"...The presence of aspirin-sensitive 3-hydroxy fatty acids (i.e. 3-OH oxylipins) in yeasts was first reported in the early 1990s. Since then, these oxidized fatty acids have been found to be widely distributed in yeasts. 3-OH oxylipins may: (1) have potent biological activity in mammalian cells; (2) act as antifungals; and (3) assist during forced spore release from enclosed sexual cells (asci). A link between 3-OH oxylipin production, mitochondria and aspirin sensitivity exists. Research suggests that: (1) 3-OH oxylipins in some yeasts are probably also produced by mitochondria through incomplete β-oxidation; (2) aspirin inhibits mitochondrial β-oxidation and 3-OH oxylipin production; (3) yeast sexual stages, which are probably more dependent on mitochondrial activity, are also characterized by higher 3-OH oxylipin levels as compared to asexual stages; (4) yeast sexual developmental stages as well as cell adherence/flocculation are more sensitive to aspirin than corresponding asexual growth stages; and (5) mitochondrion-dependent asexual yeast cells with a strict aerobic metabolism are more sensitive to aspirin than those that can also produce energy through an alternative anaerobic glycolytic fermentative pathway in which mitochondria are not involved. This review interprets a wide network of studies that reveal aspirin to be a novel antifungal."


"...In a groundbreaking study, Botha et al. (1992) analyzed the life cycles of the nonfermenting yeasts Dipodascopsis tothii and Dipodascopsis uninucleata, as well as the inhibitory effect of the NSAIDs aspirin and indomethacin. When the yeasts were grown in synchronous culture, the life cycles of both were characterized by similar consecutive asexual and sexual reproductive stages (Fig. 2). In the presence of different concentrations of aspirin (i.e. 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 mM), dose-dependent inhibition of the asexual vegetative stage was observed in both yeasts, although 0.1 and 0.2 mM aspirin did not inhibit this stage in Dipodascopsis uninucleata."

"...In addition, other NSAIDs, such as indomethacin, should be tested on their own and in combination with known antifungals for antifungal activity. In vitro studies have shown that the NSAID ibuprofen alone, and in combination with azoles, is a potent, medically useful antifungal in the treatment of candidosis, particularly when applied topically (Pina-Vaz et al., 2000). In this study, ibuprofen at 5 mg mL−1 inhibited growth, and at 10 mg mL−1 showed rapid fungicidal activity against Ca. albicans. These actions are attributed to metabolic alterations and cytoplasmic membrane damage at 5 and 10 mg mL−1, respectively. Unfortunately, no details are available in this study regarding metabolic changes induced by this NSAID."

The aspirin doses are not that high. A person can achieve concentration of 1mM with a dose of 30mg/kg aspirin orally. This should be effective against internal Candida infestations. For oral fungus or topical application, you can use the iburpofen numbers for now (see above quote).
 

narouz

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I was surprised that with my Jock Itch,
after trying all the supposedly "most effective" topical OTC drugs,
the most effective thing for me was "Gold Bond's Powder."
One of the ingredients is salicylic acid (and menthol).

haidut: do you think Candida exists as a widespread, destructive gut bug,
or do you go along with Peat in seeing it as a mostly over-diagnosed,
money-vacuuming, invented "disease"...?
 

haidut

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narouz said:
I was surprised that with my Jock Itch,
after trying all the supposedly "most effective" topical OTC drugs,
the most effective thing for me was "Gold Bond's Powder."
One of the ingredients is salicylic acid (and menthol).

haidut: do you think Candida exists as a widespread, destructive gut bug,
or do you go along with Peat in seeing it as a mostly over-diagnosed,
money-vacuuming, invented "disease"...?

Both:):
I think Candida can be a real problem for hypothyroid people and those with suppressed immune system. It has been shown to be very dangerous for people with HIV or suppressed immune system by exogenous corticosteroids for autoimmune diseases.
However, those are probably on the minority so the current advertising of Candida as a disease that everybody has is a scam IMHO.
 

narouz

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haidut said:
Both:):
I think Candida can be a real problem for hypothyroid people and those with suppressed immune system. It has been shown to be very dangerous for people with HIV or suppressed immune system by exogenous corticosteroids for autoimmune diseases.
However, those are probably on the minority so the current advertising of Candida as a disease that everybody has is a scam IMHO.

Do you have any view on the usefulness of
the Candida Antibodies, IgA, IgG, IgM, ELISA Blood Test?
 

haidut

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narouz said:
haidut said:
Both:):
I think Candida can be a real problem for hypothyroid people and those with suppressed immune system. It has been shown to be very dangerous for people with HIV or suppressed immune system by exogenous corticosteroids for autoimmune diseases.
However, those are probably on the minority so the current advertising of Candida as a disease that everybody has is a scam IMHO.

Do you have any view on the usefulness of
the Candida Antibodies, IgA, IgG, IgM, ELISA Blood Test?

Sorry, don't know much about it except that I tested negative and even my doctor thought that the test was useless.
 

narouz

Member
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Jul 22, 2012
Messages
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haidut said:
narouz said:
haidut said:
Both:):
I think Candida can be a real problem for hypothyroid people and those with suppressed immune system. It has been shown to be very dangerous for people with HIV or suppressed immune system by exogenous corticosteroids for autoimmune diseases.
However, those are probably on the minority so the current advertising of Candida as a disease that everybody has is a scam IMHO.

Do you have any view on the usefulness of
the Candida Antibodies, IgA, IgG, IgM, ELISA Blood Test?

Sorry, don't know much about it except that I tested negative and even my doctor thought that the test was useless.

Yep. Apparently, though, it is the best test there is, if you're going to test.

In the case of thebigpeatowski, a poster here, for instance,
her doctors told her they didn't test at their labs (U. of Washington?) for candida.
Kind of hard not to think she has candida:
she gets bloating/pain in her cecal area, takes Nystatin, it goes away.
She has repeated that numerous time.
Nystatin has no antibiotic properties that I know of--just antifungal.
Kinda hard to see how that's not a fungal problem--diagnosis by treatment.
And yet her doctors don't think yeast is the problem...

Thanks, haidut!
 

Makrosky

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Amazing finding haidut!!

Maybe that explains why I felt so well during an antibiotic+ibuprofen course.

Thanks!
 

haidut

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narouz said:
haidut said:
narouz said:
haidut said:
Both:):
I think Candida can be a real problem for hypothyroid people and those with suppressed immune system. It has been shown to be very dangerous for people with HIV or suppressed immune system by exogenous corticosteroids for autoimmune diseases.
However, those are probably on the minority so the current advertising of Candida as a disease that everybody has is a scam IMHO.

Do you have any view on the usefulness of
the Candida Antibodies, IgA, IgG, IgM, ELISA Blood Test?

Sorry, don't know much about it except that I tested negative and even my doctor thought that the test was useless.

Yep. Apparently, though, it is the best test there is, if you're going to test.

In the case of thebigpeatowski, a poster here, for instance,
her doctors told her they didn't test at their labs (U. of Washington?) for candida.
Kind of hard not to think she has candida:
she gets bloating/pain in her cecal area, takes Nystatin, it goes away.
She has repeated that numerous time.
Nystatin has no antibiotic properties that I know of--just antifungal.
Kinda hard to see how that's not a fungal problem--diagnosis by treatment.
And yet her doctors don't think yeast is the problem...

Thanks, haidut!

If someone has a Candida infection in their colon then there have to be fecal biomarkers that are reliable. I have also heard about a urine test for tartaric acid, which apparently is 100% specific for Candida. If the antifungal helps then I am surprised the doctor is not interested in doing some follow up. Having fungal overgrowth in the intestines is not a fun matter so most doctors take it seriously if there is an indication of overgrowth.
 

narouz

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Jul 22, 2012
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haidut said:
If someone has a Candida infection in their colon then there have to be fecal biomarkers that are reliable. I have also heard about a urine test for tartaric acid, which apparently is 100% specific for Candida. If the antifungal helps then I am surprised the doctor is not interested in doing some follow up. Having fungal overgrowth in the intestines is not a fun matter so most doctors take it seriously if there is an indication of overgrowth.

I would've thought so.
In bigp's case, it has been an "experiment" she has been able to repeat numerous times,
achieving the same clear result.
So...hard for me to see how that does not point pretty clearly to yeast problem.
And yet...when she explained this to her specialists (there were two),
it was as if they didn't even hear what she said.

This didn't really surprise me
because I've long been aware of the phenomenon of candida
and of its being regarded by the med establishment (and Peat) as mainly a hoax.
So, although I've wondered whether I might have candida myself lately,
I've never gone to a specialist.
It would seem it is simply not regarded as a real disease.

I will look into that tartaric acid test, haidut!
 

narouz

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Jul 22, 2012
Messages
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from http://www.candidafree.net/yeast_tests.htm
Here also is a quote from Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum's book, "From Fatigued To Fantastic":

"There are no definitive tests for yeast overgrowth that will distinguish yeast overgrowth from normal yeast growth in the body. There is one test that may be useful, though. This is a urine tartaric acid test. Tartaric acid is a waste product of yeast overgrowth. In fermenting wine, for example, it is critical to remove the tartaric acid. Otherwise, the wine would be toxic to people. Dr. William Shaw, head of the Great Plains Laboratory in Kansas City, Missouri, has found elevations in urine tartaric acid in both CFIDS/FMS patients and autistic children. In my experience, however, using Dr. William Crook's yeast questionnaire is still the most reliable way to tell if a person is at risk of yeast overgrowth."

...on the other hand...

from http://gifx.metametrix.com/files/learning-center/articles/Urinary-markers-of-yeast-overgrowth.pdf
URINARY MARKERS OF YEAST
OVERGROWTH

Richard S. Lord, PhD, Cheryl K. Burdette, ND, and J. Alexander Bralley, PhD

"TARTARIC ACID—NOT FROM YEAST
AND NOT A CAUSE OF AUTISM
Pure tartaric acid (tartarate) is sold to the food production
industry as an acidity regulator. The US government
allows tartaric acid use in food, with no limitation
other than current good manufacturing practice.
The affirmation of this ingredient as “generally recognized
as safe” (GRAS) is based upon the following current
good manufacturing practice conditions of use:
“The FDA allows its use as a firming agent, flavor
enhancer, humectant and as a pH control agent.
Currently, there are no sanctions for this ingredient.”33
Cream of tartar is a home and industrial food preparation
ingredient commonly used in tartar sauce,
meringues, and many other foods.
Dietary intake of tartaric acid can be very high and
difficult to control because it is widespread in foods and
pharmaceutical products. Tartaric acid comprises about
2% of the dry weight of grapes,34 and up to about 1%
of whole fresh grapes (see Table 1). Sun-dried raisins, a
common dietary item and food ingredient, are a rich
dietary source. A 100 g serving of sun-dried raisins contains
as much as 3.5 g of tartaric acid. Tartaric acid plays
a role in the acidity of wine, and excess tartaric acid is
often removed by winemakers to improve flavor. The
tartaric acid in wine is not created by the yeast used for
fermentation, but rather derived from the grapes.35,36
Tamarind has the highest reported tartaric acid content
in foods. The dry pulp of tamarind fruit has been
reported to contain 8-18 g/100 g wet weight, which is
the apparent reason why it has been used as a laxative
drink (see medicinal uses below).
In addition to being found in many other medications,
tartaric acid is also found in butorphanol, a drug
commonly used to palliate autistic symptoms.52 This
may be one explanation of why tartaric acid is sometimes
elevated in autistic children.
In 1995, Shaw reported that tartaric acid was present
in the urine of the two autistic brothers.26 Although
the concentrations of tartaric acid in the two individuals’
urine were highly variable, Shaw believed that these
compounds could be causally related to the autistic
symptoms. As the compounds are not human metabolites,
Shaw suggested that their origin was an infection
with yeast or bacteria. In a subsequent publication,
Shaw proposed intestinal yeast overgrowth as the probable
origin of the urinary tartarate because its concentration
appeared to decrease after therapy with nystatin.53
However, we argue that the appearance of tartarate
in urine is not a marker of yeast growth, nor is
tartarate likely to cause any metabolic toxicity.
To demonstrate the magnitude of the influence of
dietary tartaric acid on urinary levels, we measured urinary
tartarate after ingestion of grape juice and wine.
Overnight urinary tartaric acid was measured on two
successive days for a healthy adult male. A concentration
of 3.0 mcg/mg of creatinine was found on the first
day with normal dietary intake. On the second day,
after consuming 18 ounces of grape juice between 7
and 10 PM on the evening prior to collecting the urine,
tartaric acid was above the quantitative limit of detection
(>500 mcg/mg of creatinine). No adverse symptoms
accompanied the radical increase in tartaric acid.
Another healthy subject consumed 12 ounces of grape
juice, and two others consumed two glasses of wine
during the evening, prior to collection of urine. All
three subjects were found to have increases in tartaric
acid levels from < 10 to 90.0, 179, and 210 ug/mg creatinine,
respectively. None of them experienced any
unusual symptoms. In Shaw’s study, the two subjects
were reported to have tartaric acid levels of 69.2
mmol/mol equivalent to 91.9 ug/mg of creatinine.
In a study of the sleep-waking rhythm effects on
organic-acid excretion, samples were collected at approximate
5-hour intervals every day for 14 days. While on a
diet in which black currant jam was the only significant
source of tartaric acid, two healthy male subjects consistently
excreted significant levels of tartarate in urine.
When they were shifted to an all-rice diet, urinary tartarate
became undetectable. The good health of the two subjects
remained unchanged, regardless of tartaric acid levels.54
In the intestinal tract, tartarate appears to be metabolized
instead of produced by fungi and bacteria. Pasteur
first demonstrated this in 1860 when he found that d-tartaric acid
is destroyed by the yeast Penicillium glaucum.
55
Tartaric acid can be used as a medium to grow Candida
tartarivorans56 and a significant number of species of
Basidiomycetous.57 Shaw mentions brewer’s yeast as an
agent that might produce tartaric acid.26 However,
ethanol and glycerol are the predominant metabolic
products formed during anaerobic fermentation by
Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
58 Concentrations of metabolites
produced by S. cerevesiae vary depending on the substrate
used, but tartaric acid does not appear to be among
them.59 In addition to its destruction by yeast, at least 23
varieties of bacteria are able to degrade tartaric acid.60
Other than the putative association made by Shaw, there
is no evidence that any type of yeast or fungus can produce
tartaric acid as a metabolic end-product.
Because our laboratory has been reporting urinary
D-arabinitol, we were able to retrospectively examine
the data for correlation of this well-established yeast test
with urinary tartarate. No significant correlation (coefficient
= 0.0009) was found as D-arabinitol concentrations
varied from < 1.0 to > 500 ug/mg creatinine in 512
patients (see Figure 1). The population included 260
patients < 12 years old, and the remainder was approximately
evenly distributed between 15 and 78 years old.
 

haidut

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narouz said:
haidut said:
If someone has a Candida infection in their colon then there have to be fecal biomarkers that are reliable. I have also heard about a urine test for tartaric acid, which apparently is 100% specific for Candida. If the antifungal helps then I am surprised the doctor is not interested in doing some follow up. Having fungal overgrowth in the intestines is not a fun matter so most doctors take it seriously if there is an indication of overgrowth.

I would've thought so.
In bigp's case, it has been an "experiment" she has been able to repeat numerous times,
achieving the same clear result.
So...hard for me to see how that does not point pretty clearly to yeast problem.
And yet...when she explained this to her specialists (there were two),
it was as if they didn't even hear what she said.

This didn't really surprise me
because I've long been aware of the phenomenon of candida
and of its being regarded by the med establishment (and Peat) as mainly a hoax.
So, although I've wondered whether I might have candida myself lately,
I've never gone to a specialist.
It would seem it is simply not regarded as a real disease.

I will look into that tartaric acid test, haidut!

In the vast majority of cases Candida overgrowth only occur in people with compromised immune system. If BigP has shown normal results on tests like CBC then I am not surprised the doctor do not take it seriously since even if it is there it should not be a problem. Candida can and does become a real problem for people with HIV or other conditions causing immune suppression.
I guess given the study above, a possible treatment to be tried would include 1g aspirin 3 times a day for a total of 3g, combined with methylene blue. Here is one study (attached) in renal Candida infections in children, which shows that MB is very effective and combining it with sodium bicarbonate dramatically increases the effectiveness. The human dose required to achieve the concentrations of 9.4ug/mL are about 80mg-90mg for a human orally. So, I guess a good combo would be Alka Seltzer dissolved in water so that it gives a dose of 1g of aspirin and add 30mg of methylene blue to the solution. Repeat this dose 3 times a day.
Since this was effective in renal Candida I see no reason why it would not work on intestinal Candida as well. However, as usual, I would ask a doctor first.

"...We have found that the metabolites of MB in urine inhibit Candida colonization for 7 hours after oral intake of MB. In vitro studies had shown that minimum inhibitory concentrations for 90% inhibition (MIC90) of MB were only 150ug/ml and were reduced to 9.4ug/ml in a slightly akaline environment. Peroral bicarbonate for alkalization of urine or adding bicarbonate to the irrigating solution increases the antifungal effect of MB and thus the dose of MB can be decreased."

"...Renal calculus formation in the urinary tract after fungal infections has been reported. MB has been used for the prevention of renal and catheter concentrations. This effect of MB adds further benefits to the therapy of renal candidiasis such as prevention of calcium deposists on fungus balls and maybe by rapid dissolution of fungus balls in the pelvis."

"...MB can be used for treatment of candiduria which develops during prolonged catheterization. In these forms of candidiasis it was shown that irrigation of the urinary tract with antifungal agents, such as fluconazole, clears urinary CA colonization. MB solution can be a cheap alternative for this kind of irrigation therapy."
 

Strongbad

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I did this aspirin experiment for 6 days to clean candida off. I can only held it for 6 days and the last time I took aspirin it hurts the abdominal so bad so I quit.

Basically it was 3g aspirin + 1.5g glycine + lots of vitamin K, split into 3 times daily.
 

haidut

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I did this aspirin experiment for 6 days to clean candida off. I can only held it for 6 days and the last time I took aspirin it hurts the abdominal so bad so I quit.

Basically it was 3g aspirin + 1.5g glycine + lots of vitamin K, split into 3 times daily.

Larger doses niacinamide are also anti-Candida as is methylene blue. Since neither one of them hurts the stomach you can try them next. I think niacinamide dose was 3g+ daily and methyleen blue was 30mg daily. Both taken for only 2-3 days.
How do you know you have Candida to start with?
 

narouz

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How do you know you have Candida to start with?

Is there any way to really know this?
This is the thing that drives me crazy about Candida:
there doesn't really seem to be a test that is generally accepted which can prove you "have Candida."
By "have Candida" what I mean is
that one has widespread symptoms (backache, bad poops, bad libido, tongue coating, etc) beyond just the gut,
although the gut seems to be the center/cause.

There are several pretty expensive tests one can get,
but seems to me the bottom line is
if I brought them back here, say, and posted the results and they were positive...
still wouldn't prove I "have Candida."

I just decided diagnosis by treatment would be cheaper and more credible as "proof."
thebigpeatowski repeatedly knocked out her symptoms with Nystatin.
I've used the candida killing yeast S. boulardii with strong positive results.
Same with a brief dosing of Nystatin.
Hard for me to see this as not pointing to a fungal problem.
 

haidut

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Location
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Is there any way to really know this?
This is the thing that drives me crazy about Candida:
there doesn't really seem to be a test that is generally accepted which can prove you "have Candida."
By "have Candida" what I mean is
that one has widespread symptoms (backache, bad poops, bad libido, tongue coating, etc) beyond just the gut,
although the gut seems to be the center/cause.

There are several pretty expensive tests one can get,
but seems to me the bottom line is
if I brought them back here, say, and posted the results and they were positive...
still wouldn't prove I "have Candida."

I just decided diagnosis by treatment would be cheaper and more credible as "proof."
thebigpeatowski repeatedly knocked out her symptoms with Nystatin.
I've used the candida killing yeast S. boulardii with strong positive results.
Same with a brief dosing of Nystatin.
Hard for me to see this as not pointing to a fungal problem.

There are some more definitive tests for fungal infections even though they are not specific for Candida. They were used back in the 1960s but I can't remember right now what they were. If immune system is functioning properly then Candida should not be a problem even though I do see the benefit in getting rid of it.
Anyways, I'd be curious to hear how the experiment goes.
 

Interactome

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Is there any way to really know this?
This is the thing that drives me crazy about Candida:
there doesn't really seem to be a test that is generally accepted which can prove you "have Candida."
By "have Candida" what I mean is
that one has widespread symptoms (backache, bad poops, bad libido, tongue coating, etc) beyond just the gut,
although the gut seems to be the center/cause.

There are several pretty expensive tests one can get,
but seems to me the bottom line is
if I brought them back here, say, and posted the results and they were positive...
still wouldn't prove I "have Candida."

I just decided diagnosis by treatment would be cheaper and more credible as "proof."
thebigpeatowski repeatedly knocked out her symptoms with Nystatin.
I've used the candida killing yeast S. boulardii with strong positive results.
Same with a brief dosing of Nystatin.
Hard for me to see this as not pointing to a fungal problem.

Hi

I want to try the Syntol that you mentioned in another post. Does it permanently alter the intestinal flora?

Do you know if excessive thirst and visible veins are a symptom of some type of fungal overgrowth? And very alkaline urinary pH (>7)? I read that Candida produces an alkaline environment, so if it were systemic wouldn't that make the body more alkaline? Wouldn't NaHCO3 make the problem worse?
 

Parsifal

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Messages
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In the vast majority of cases Candida overgrowth only occur in people with compromised immune system. If BigP has shown normal results on tests like CBC then I am not surprised the doctor do not take it seriously since even if it is there it should not be a problem. Candida can and does become a real problem for people with HIV or other conditions causing immune suppression.
I guess given the study above, a possible treatment to be tried would include 1g aspirin 3 times a day for a total of 3g, combined with methylene blue. Here is one study (attached) in renal Candida infections in children, which shows that MB is very effective and combining it with sodium bicarbonate dramatically increases the effectiveness. The human dose required to achieve the concentrations of 9.4ug/mL are about 80mg-90mg for a human orally. So, I guess a good combo would be Alka Seltzer dissolved in water so that it gives a dose of 1g of aspirin and add 30mg of methylene blue to the solution. Repeat this dose 3 times a day.
Since this was effective in renal Candida I see no reason why it would not work on intestinal Candida as well. However, as usual, I would ask a doctor first.

"...We have found that the metabolites of MB in urine inhibit Candida colonization for 7 hours after oral intake of MB. In vitro studies had shown that minimum inhibitory concentrations for 90% inhibition (MIC90) of MB were only 150ug/ml and were reduced to 9.4ug/ml in a slightly akaline environment. Peroral bicarbonate for alkalization of urine or adding bicarbonate to the irrigating solution increases the antifungal effect of MB and thus the dose of MB can be decreased."

"...Renal calculus formation in the urinary tract after fungal infections has been reported. MB has been used for the prevention of renal and catheter concentrations. This effect of MB adds further benefits to the therapy of renal candidiasis such as prevention of calcium deposists on fungus balls and maybe by rapid dissolution of fungus balls in the pelvis."

"...MB can be used for treatment of candiduria which develops during prolonged catheterization. In these forms of candidiasis it was shown that irrigation of the urinary tract with antifungal agents, such as fluconazole, clears urinary CA colonization. MB solution can be a cheap alternative for this kind of irrigation therapy."

Haidut, do you know why is sodium bicarbonate producing indigestions and why it is very diuretic?
 

narouz

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Hi

I want to try the Syntol that you mentioned in another post. Does it permanently alter the intestinal flora?

Do you know if excessive thirst and visible veins are a symptom of some type of fungal overgrowth? And very alkaline urinary pH (>7)? I read that Candida produces an alkaline environment, so if it were systemic wouldn't that make the body more alkaline? Wouldn't NaHCO3 make the problem worse?

I like the Syntol.
I don't know about the "permanently alter" aspect.
It may be true that Candida causes an alkaline environment--not sure.
What I've read is that it likes and alkaline environment,
so yes, it makes sense that anything one does to make the gut more alkaline might cause problems
in terms of yeast/fungi.
The visible veins thing...
I'd had that--still do somewhat, especially on the back of my hands.
I've read here on the forum somewhere in the past
that Peat sees this as...what?...I think he sees it as too much estrogen/serotonin.
 

zooma

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Dec 8, 2014
Messages
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The visible veins thing...
I'd had that--still do somewhat, especially on the back of my hands.
I've read here on the forum somewhere in the past
that Peat sees this as...what?...I think he sees it as too much estrogen/serotonin.
I thought the main mechanism is chronically high cortisol, thinning the skin.
 

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