Eating Organs

Discussion in 'Organ Meat' started by chris, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. chris

    chris Member

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    As we know liver is very useful but is there any benefits from eating other organs, for example heart, kidney etc

    Thanks.
     
  2. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Heart, is technically a muscle meat.

    I think, if you eat the kindeys, that helps the kidneys, if you eat the eyes, that will help your eyes. Is that correct? Just like eating thyroid gland, it supports the thyroid.
     
  3. j.

    j. Guest

    That would be interesting to know. I think eating thyroid supports thyroid function because it has T3 and T4. I don't know if it helps the thyroid gland specifically, at least directly, I thought it just gave the body the products of the thyroid gland.
     
  4. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    I dunno, that was the conclusion I came to at one point or other. Not sure if it's correct though, that's why I am asking.

    Muscle meats, high in trytophan(sp?)... which does what? Build muscles.
     
  5. nwo2012

    nwo2012 Member

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    Lambs brains, taste great. And high in progesterone and pregnenolone too. Yummy.

    Kidneys, would be 2nd to liver in terms of good nutrients.
     
  6. narouz

    narouz Member

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    By the way, since we're on the lovely subject of organ eating:

    For those of you who struggle with beef liver,
    yesterday I bought at Whole Foods some Veal or Calf Liver.
    Excellent.
    Much milder and more tender.

    Also about 2 to 3 times more expensive, though.
     
  7. John Eels

    John Eels Member

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    Yes, I agree with narouz. Veal liver is fabulous. Still funny to smn. who isn't used to the taste. I start to like it very much. It's fascinating how food taste is malleable. It helps to stick with conscious food choices. On the other hand I find it interesting how people eat intuitively healthy. My sister doesn't know anything about Peat. She loves coffee, drinks lots of milk and fruit juices. She discovered those foods by listening to hear body.
     
  8. Birdie

    Birdie Member

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    Tryptophan:
    Quote from Rob at functionalps.
     

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  9. Birdie

    Birdie Member

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    I agree. It's good. I can only get calf liver. That is all I use. It's not that expensive where I live. We have no Whole Foods out here. :)

    I saute onions in butter + coconut oil and then the liver. When I bring the liver home, I rinse it and wrap and freeze flat. This makes it easier at cooking time for me.

    I see the tongues sometimes but haven't the courage to deal with them as they are so big. And, now Charlie makes me think about the muscle aspect.
     
  10. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    The heart actually makes anti cancer enzymes, so FRESH, healthy heart would still have those enzymes available.
    Keeping organs in context....a cow has 1 liver...how many whole cows do you eat in a year? Just saying.....

    Tongue is a muscle that is also high in gelatin, like ribeye. It's a very yummy cut and you can make a fabulous broth from the skin. I wish cows had ten tongues. :D
     
  11. narouz

    narouz Member

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    I'm not sure about this.
    I've never had tongue,
    but the way I've thought of it is, as you say, a muscle--a muscle meat.
    Now...does that mean it is also high in gelatin?
    Personally, I wouldn't assume so.

    Gelatin comes mainly, I thought, from the cartilage and tendons and connective tissues.
    All those contain collagen.
    When collagen is cooked it breaks down into gelatin.

    Now ribeye would seem to be a muscle meat which is pretty fatty
    but...unless you are "fortunate" enough (I guess, from a gelatin standpoint)
    to get a lot of gristle in that ribeye...
    I wouldn't think it has much of any gelatin.

    Same with tongue.
    Maybe I'm wrong.
    But the tongue, from what I've heard,
    can be very tasty and tender without cooking hours.
    It would surprise me if I found that tongue had a lot of gristle, thus collagen, thus gelatin when cooked.

    A smart poster here, I think maybe it was gabriel79 or something like that,
    said he tries to get his healthy gelatin in his meat
    by asking his butcher to cut his steaks so as to include quite a bit of gristle.
    He first eats the gristle, then enjoys the steak--if I understood him correctly.

    I thought: well, I guess that would work.
    I mean, it would be hard for me to do that because I don't go to a butcher to get my meat.
    I have my doubts that the butchers at Whole Paycheck
    would cut me an especially gristle-inclusive steak.
    But...I guess that approach could work if you could find the right butcher.

    But a couple points and questions:
    1. seems to me you would have to eat gristle in a steak to get collagen;
    I mean: as far as I know, there is not some kind of collagen hiding tenderly
    in a ribeye; you'd have to find a gristly one.
    2. if you ate that gristle after only cooking steak-like times, like under 10 minutes,
    seems like you'd be eating collagen; but would you make gelatin out of that collagen?
    Or is that something that can only occur through cooking?
    3. on tongue: like I said, not sure that it has a high gristle content, and again,
    I wouldn't imagine that it has some other kind of collagen-bearing tissue that I don't know about
    which would also be tender without long cooking.
     
  12. j.

    j. Guest

    I asked Ray Peat if tongue was better than the typical muscle meat. He said he hasn't seen the amino acid analysis, but suspects it's about the same.

    I asked him a while ago, I thought I posted the info somewhere.
     
  13. jaa

    jaa Member

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    True, but I don't eat the whole animal of smaller things squirrel or bugs, or even duck or fish for that matter. Cow liver can make up for some of those missing whole animal vitamins :)
     
  14. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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    I once ate tongue by mistake. It wasn't even that bad.
     
  15. jb4566

    jb4566 Member

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    I heard that beef heart has a ton of collagen in it. Can anyone verify this?
     
  16. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    This article claims it has twice as much as regular meat. She doesn't cite a source though.
    Found the article thru this fellow's blog where he posts a beef heart stew recipe. He's a post paleo guy and fan of Matt Stone, FWIW.

     
  17. BaconBits

    BaconBits Member

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    I dont know. I tend to avoid pork organs, since those parts of the animal could be extremely high in hepatits E and other uknown toxin and are very hard to marinate. Keep in mind that Hepatitis E is a fairly new disease, its probably a pigs disease that spread to humans, first in India in 1955 and has found in Europe since 1980s.

    Problem with beef organs, especially kidney its the horrible smell, cooking it makes your house smell like stinky public toilet or a barn.

    Calf organs would probably be nice, but are hard to get.

    But I remember we used to eat a lot of cow tongue in the early and mid 90s, it was cured like a salami, it was quite nice, now you cant get that anywhere in regular supermarket anymore.

    Hiding beef heart in ground meat is a great idea, but not for me because I always buy prepackaged ground meat-
     
  18. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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    Tongue itself is high in iron right so have it with milk?
     
  19. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    Coffee, because it inhibits iron absorption among many other wonderful things.
     
  20. Jenn

    Jenn Member

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    Tongue is one of my favorite cuts of meat. It is covered in skin, which is collagen. Look up the stats at nutrition data or some other website. You remove the skin when you eat it, but the skin can then be made into a FABULOUS broth.
     
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