Organ Meatloaf, Romanian Style

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by Isadora, Mar 20, 2013.

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  1. Isadora

    Isadora Member

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    I didn't know how else to call this, it's an archaic Romanian Easter recipe, prepared with lamb's organs (all of them, including lungs and spleen!), but you can do it with any kind of organs you have hidden in your freezer waiting for an adventurous cooking day... Just make sure you have a liver and a heart, at least... But kidneys do play a part, try veal or lamb. No brains in this one, though.

    First, make sure you have six-seven stalks of green onions, one regular onion, some garlic, according to your taste, and lots and lots of parsley and dill -- plus whatever other aromatic herbs you are partial to and think would improve -- or indeed mask -- the flavor of the unappetizing organ meats. You will need a few eggs, depending on how much organ meat you are using. There is no science behind it, whatever looks good. Let's say five eggs for two pounds of meat.

    Round up all the organs, frozen or not, and boil them in salted water. You can do the "throw the first water" trick I have described elsewhere -- after a first boil, when all the scummy foam is on top, throw all the water away, rinse the meat and restart the boiling with fresh water, rather than straining the foam from the top.

    Now you have a bunch of boiled organ meats and a bunch of herbs and eggs. If you are a beginner with organ meat, just put them all in a food processor and turn them into a paste. Don't be shy with pepper, salt, whatever you think might improve/mask the taste. Go crazy. If you find green garlic, that's a nice touch, the best, actually. If you are a hardened gourmet and appreciate the different textures, cut the meat into small pieces and process the rest of the ingredients, then assemble everything into a chunkier paste.

    Take some cake pans and pour the mixture, then put it in the oven. You can give it a shiny crust using one or two beaten eggs on top. Other people also boiled eggs and put them whole on the bottom of the pan, pouring the mixture on top. When you cut it, it looks pretty.

    Bake it till it looks done -- basically, the eggs and veggies need to cook, the meat is already boiled.

    It's good hot or cold, it will keep in the fridge and you might love it. I've eaten it since I was a kid, at absolutely every Easter, so it's easy for me to talk... Since I went Paleo I started cooking it once in a while as a replacement for salamis and other such less healthy goodies.

    I prefer to eat it with mustard, but hardcore Peatards might disapprove.
     
  2. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Looks apetizing !

    I would just like to add my share; skip the kidneys !
    Lead's concentration levels in kidneys are off the charts because this is how it gets excreted.
    NEVER eat the kidneys of ANY animal.
     
  3. OP
    Isadora

    Isadora Member

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    Thanks for the tip, burtlancast, I didn't know that! I imagine, the older the animal, the more mercury, right?

    Even a lamb's kidneys would amass mercury? If they were fed exclusively milk, probably not, right? They make the distinction here, for Easter they have "agneau de lait" vs. simply "agneau"...

    I recently read very compelling stuff against eating brains, too..:(
     
  4. burtlancast

    burtlancast Member

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    Sorry, Isadora, i meant to say Lead.

    I've read this in Francoise's Cambayrac " Vérités sur les maladies émergentes" book, treating about mercury poisonning by amalgams. Highly, highly recommended for anyone who had these poisons implanted in their mouth.
     
  5. j.

    j. Guest

    What's wrong with brains?
     
  6. OP
    Isadora

    Isadora Member

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    The eternal prion diseases.

    Since I no longer believe in Omega 3s (check out the nutritional content for lamb brain), that's not such a big deal. And they weren't that great tasting either.

    No big loss for the kidneys, I guess. Although, they did have a nice texture and they looked interesting when sectioned. I was never a big fan, though, like I am for liver. And heart, occasionally, although that has to be the least nutritionally spectacular organ.

    Looking more closely at those charts -- why are kidneys and brain so anti-inflammatory, heart, rather inflammatory, and liver -- very inflammatory? :?
     
  7. Strongbad

    Strongbad Member

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    How about kidneys from grass-fed beef? Is it high risk of lead, too?
     
  8. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    The bad: This food is high in Saturated Fat, and very high in Cholesterol.

    I wouldn't trust any of those automated food judgements, personally.
     
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