Thiamine, histamine, and hypothermia

Discussion in 'B1' started by Vinero, Apr 12, 2014.

  1. Vinero

    Vinero Member

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    It seems that a thiamine deficiency, also known as vitamin B1, can have some undesirable consequences such as:
    -Increased histamine levels: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF01997372
    -Low body temperature: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2090843

    Haidut already posted studies about how thiamine can cure Crohn's/IBS, MS fatigue, and Alzheimers in massive doses ranging from 500mg-1500mg every 4 hours. The sufferers in the studies weren't deficient in thiamine according to bloodtests, yet benefited from supplementation.
    The standards for adequate thiamine are simply too low; or the body has trouble getting thiamine into the cells despite normal blood levels.
    So, if your still having low temperatures, stomach problems, and excess histamine despite doing everything right, you might have a mild thiamine deficiency going on. Especially if you are eating a lot of white sugar, caffeine, aspirin, etc which stimulate metabolism deepening the thiamine deficiency.
     
  2. Suikerbuik

    Suikerbuik Member

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    Hate all those new started topics about the same subject (in this case B1) :)

    Here's Haidut's original post:
    http://www.raypeatforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=2669

    Doubt it cures disease, but it seems to regress fatigue considerably. Would love to know if there's indeed a reduced transport and why. But there's more mechanisms involved, certainly interesting stuff that B1!

    http://cgp.iiarjournals.org/content/10/4/169.full

    To make the picture more complete:
    Thiamine and fatigue in inflammatory bowel diseases: an open-label pilot study.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23379830

    High dose thiamine improves fatigue in multiple sclerosis.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23861280

    Altered expression of tight junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinases in thiamine-deficient mouse brain.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19576514

    Increased brain endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in thiamine deficiency: relationship to selective vulnerability.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15082221

    Selective increase of neuronal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in vulnerable brain regions of rats with experimental Wernicke's encephalopathy: effect of nimesulide.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18481165
     
  3. jyb

    jyb Member

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