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TETANUS Vaccine & Health Decline Reports (Post Here)

Dolomite

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You mentioned that your husband did not have the toxin but he did have the common antigen or GDH. I don't know if the common antigen for C. difficile would be found in C. tetani. It might be common to both because the kit manufacturers and physicians would not be expecting to find C. tetani at all due to vaccinations.

From @Rinse and Repeat:
Now what is the odds that my husband went into the hospital a second time and tested positive for a clostridium infection too?

"Tetanus is caused by Clostridium tetani, which one of its toxins, tetanospasmin is the cause of clinical symptoms. The incubation period is generally 3 days to 3 weeks. The clinical severity is due to the amount of toxin and the neural distance to reach the neuronal body. The clinic outcome may be localized, generalized and cephalic which can be mild to severe. Trismus, risus sardonicus, dysphagia, abdominal rigidity and opisthotonos can be a part of clinical picture in generalized form. Here we report a case who previously admitted several clinics with back pain which was resistant to analgesic drugs."
 

Rinse & rePeat

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"Although having better nutritional status and being protected against three infections, 6–35 months old DTP-vaccinated children tended to have higher mortality than DTP-unvaccinated children. All studies of the introduction of DTP have found increased overall mortality."

 

Rinse & rePeat

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You mentioned that your husband did not have the toxin but he did have the common antigen or GDH. I don't know if the common antigen for C. difficile would be found in C. tetani. It might be common to both because the kit manufacturers and physicians would not be expecting to find C. tetani at all due to vaccinations.

Now what is the odds that my husband went into the hospital a second time and tested positive for a clostridium infection too?

"Tetanus is caused by Clostridium tetani, which one of its toxins, tetanospasmin is the cause of clinical symptoms. The incubation period is generally 3 days to 3 weeks. The clinical severity is due to the amount of toxin and the neural distance to reach the neuronal body. The clinic outcome may be localized, generalized and cephalic which can be mild to severe. Trismus, risus sardonicus, dysphagia, abdominal rigidity and opisthotonos can be a part of clinical picture in generalized form. Here we report a case who previously admitted several clinics with back pain which was resistant to analgesic drugs."

I think the dots are connecting. What do we do do now?
 

Dolomite

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1642191600641.png1642191600641.png
This is from the package insert of the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test by TechLab. I bolded the Clostridium species that DID NOT react but you notice that tetani is not listed.
page12image1039069744 page12image1039070912page12image1039072080 page12image1039073312
Fecal specimens inoculated with the following microorganisms to a final concentration of approximately 108 or higher organisms per mL did not react in the antigen or toxin portion of the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test:

Bacterium or Pathogen: Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacteroides fragilis, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter fetus, Campylobacter jejuni, Candida albicans, Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium clostridiforme, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium histolyticum, Clostridium novyi, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium septicum, Clostridium sordellii (nontoxigenic), Clostridium sporogenes, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli EIEC, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Escherichia coli ETEC, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Serratia liquifaciens, Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus aureus (Cowans), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Yersinia enterocolitica

The only non-C. difficile organism to react in the toxin portion of the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test was Clostridium sordellii VPI 9048. This strain produces toxins HT and LT, which are homologous to toxins A and B, respectively.
 

Dolomite

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This may rule out the C. diff infection but that is minor to the back trauma he is suffering from.

It is the toxin that has/is causing the damage. That Shakuyakukanzoto looks promising.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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View attachment 32364View attachment 32364
This is from the package insert of the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test by TechLab. I bolded the Clostridium species that DID NOT react but you notice that tetani is not listed.
View attachment 32364 View attachment 32365View attachment 32367 View attachment 32366
Fecal specimens inoculated with the following microorganisms to a final concentration of approximately 108 or higher organisms per mL did not react in the antigen or toxin portion of the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test:

Bacterium or Pathogen: Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacteroides fragilis, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter fetus, Campylobacter jejuni, Candida albicans, Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium clostridiforme, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium histolyticum, Clostridium novyi, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium septicum, Clostridium sordellii (nontoxigenic), Clostridium sporogenes, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli EIEC, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Escherichia coli ETEC, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Serratia liquifaciens, Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus aureus (Cowans), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Yersinia enterocolitica

The only non-C. difficile organism to react in the toxin portion of the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test was Clostridium sordellii VPI 9048. This strain produces toxins HT and LT, which are homologous to toxins A and B, respectively.
That is telling!
 

Rinse & rePeat

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This may rule out the C. diff infection but that is minor to the back trauma he is suffering from.

It is the toxin that has/is causing the damage. That Shakuyakukanzoto looks promising.
I never heard of it. Time for more research.
 

Dolomite

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These two paragraphs are from the CDC:
C. tetani produces two exotoxins, tetanolysin and tetanospasmin. Tetanospasmin is a neurotoxin and causes the clinical manifestations of tetanus. On the basis of weight, tetanospasmin is one of the most potent toxins known: the estimated minimum human lethal dose is 2.5 nanograms per kilogram of body weight (a nanogram is one billionth of a gram) or 175 nanograms for a 70-kg (154 lb) human.

Tetanus immune globulin (TIG) is recommended for persons with tetanus. TIG can only help remove unbound tetanus toxin. It cannot affect toxin bound to nerve endings. A single intramuscular dose of 500 units is generally recommended for children and adults, with part of the dose infiltrated around the wound if it can be identified. Intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) contains tetanus antitoxin and may be used if TIG is not available.


I can't find it again but I read that the vaccine contains formaldehyde treated tetanus toxin. Perhaps the one your husband received was entirely treated.
 

Dolomite

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9) How the preventative vaccine works​

The tetanus toxoid vaccine became commercially available in the US in 1938 but was not widely used until the military introduced routine vaccination in 1941. [3]

The tetanus vaccine contains inactivated tetanus toxoid. This is prepared by treating tetanus toxin chemically (usually by formaldehyde) to render it nontoxic without losing its immunogenic properties. The toxoid is concentrated, purified and absorbed onto a suitable adjuvant. [5]

Immunization with tetanus toxoid stimulates the body to create protective antibodies to the tetanus toxin.



The above is what I was reading and if the vaccine was poorly manufactured there might still be some toxin that isn't nontoxic.
 

Rinse & rePeat

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9) How the preventative vaccine works​

The tetanus toxoid vaccine became commercially available in the US in 1938 but was not widely used until the military introduced routine vaccination in 1941. [3]

The tetanus vaccine contains inactivated tetanus toxoid. This is prepared by treating tetanus toxin chemically (usually by formaldehyde) to render it nontoxic without losing its immunogenic properties. The toxoid is concentrated, purified and absorbed onto a suitable adjuvant. [5]

Immunization with tetanus toxoid stimulates the body to create protective antibodies to the tetanus toxin.



The above is what I was reading and if the vaccine was poorly manufactured there might still be some toxin that isn't nontoxic.

That is scary to think! What oopsy!
 

Rinse & rePeat

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I guess tetanus isn't from just rusty nails anymore. Here is what your link said. The dental extractions, accupuncture and piercings are a surprise!


"According to one survey, 30% of all soil contains tetanus spores."

"Deep-tissue wounds contaminated with soil, fecal matter or rusty metal are typical causes of tetanus. However, spores can also enter the body via the following means: [5] [9] [10]

Animal bites

Burns

Childbirth or abortion related infections of the uterus

Chronic dermatitis

Chronic middle ear infections

Compound fractures

Necrotic tumours

Non-sterile acupuncture or body piercings

Non-sterile intravenous or muscular injections

Splinters

Surgery or dental extractions

Ulcers

While severe wounds are common causes of tetanus, the infection can also follow trivial injuries. In fact, up to 50% of tetanus cases occur after indoor injuries or injuries not considered serious enough to seek medical treatment. In 15–25% of cases, there is no evidence of a recent wound."
 

Pina

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I guess tetanus isn't from just rusty nails anymore. Here is what your link said. The dental extractions, accupuncture and piercings are a surprise!


"According to one survey, 30% of all soil contains tetanus spores."

"Deep-tissue wounds contaminated with soil, fecal matter or rusty metal are typical causes of tetanus. However, spores can also enter the body via the following means: [5] [9] [10]

Animal bites

Burns

Childbirth or abortion related infections of the uterus

Chronic dermatitis

Chronic middle ear infections

Compound fractures

Necrotic tumours

Non-sterile acupuncture or body piercings

Non-sterile intravenous or muscular injections

Splinters

Surgery or dental extractions

Ulcers

While severe wounds are common causes of tetanus, the infection can also follow trivial injuries. In fact, up to 50% of tetanus cases occur after indoor injuries or injuries not considered serious enough to seek medical treatment. In 15–25% of cases, there is no evidence of a recent wound."
Dr, Suzanne Humphries has made a lot of videos on the vaccines including tetanus vaccines. I've posted some of them. She thinks the risk of tetanus is over inflated. See her books also. This her website

 

Rinse & rePeat

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"Upsides​

  • May be used as a muscle relaxant in addition to rest and physical therapy to relieve discomfort associated with acute, painful, musculoskeletal conditions (third-line therapy for the relief of chronic back pain).
  • May be used for the relief of TETANUS spasms."
 

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