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If You Don't Eat Meat, Liver Or Organ Meats What Can You Be Missing?

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by biggirlkisss, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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    if you don't eat meat, liver or organ meats what can you be missing? Other then of course b12, A, k2 D3 what else? little bit of milk ok asking for someone else.
     
  2. tara

    tara Member

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    Have you tried using cronometer.com to record the food you eat on a typical day?
    It gives an approximation of what nutrients you are getting from that foo.
    Then you can see if there are things you are not getting much of.
     
  3. Liubo

    Liubo Member

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    Yes use cronometer because I can't tell how much copper and vitamin A you are getting without liver. But that is mainly what liver is eaten for although there are other good things in it, like chromium.

    Liver is really cheap; you just don't like it?
     
  4. tara

    tara Member

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    I think liver has a bit of lots of minerals and vitamins in it.
    I tend to think of it as a bit of a multi.
     
  5. Ritchie

    Ritchie Member

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    Meat, liver and organs are all extremely high in iron, and have a sub-optimal amino acid profile, being very high in both tryptophan and methionine among other things. All of which you don't want to be eating much of, if at all. Liver is also extremely high in vitamin A which can be a problem for thyroid among other things if consumed to much. Vitamin A can be obtained from a plethora of other sources at a much safer level. As can copper (apricots, mushrooms, dark chocolate, leafy greens).
     
  6. cyclops

    cyclops Member

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    Im sure Peat knows all this, but he still recommends it. Why do you think that is?
     
  7. raypeatclips

    raypeatclips Member

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    Let me guess the other vitamin a sources are plants such as carrots and kale? That vitamin a is predominantly beta carotene, Peat has talked about this many times.

    Liver also has, Peat believes, good levels of vitamins E and K, B vitamins, as well as some sort of beneficial steroids.
     
  8. Ritchie

    Ritchie Member

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    Correct, Peat has spoken extensively about beta carotene, and has said that if ones thyroid is working OK or better then it is a non-issue in conversion to vitamin A (i.e. easily converted). He has stated that excess vitamin A poses more of a risk to thyroid function. However, he has also stated that if one is extremely hypothyroid, beta carotene conversion to vitamin A could be an issue and excess of the former could be a detriment to thyroid function, however he has also stated numerous times that excess vitamin A can also be very detrimental to thyroid and metabolism in general and hinder the metabolism of the other fat solubles. Peat often references his acne and how he managed to get rid of it by consuming liver, attributing the benefit to the high levels of vitamin A. This would make sense as numerous studies show a correlation with reduced acne and vitamin A intake. However, as always, context is crucial as Peat probably has strong thyroid function (he does supplement with thyroid and has stated that he aims to be slightly hyperthyroid in his supplementation) and as such can probably handle the extra vitamin A levels. That being said he only advocates a small amount of liver and only within context, once a week or once a fortnight. Are you concerned about your vitamin A intake and levels? If so, why? The negatives of liver seem to outweigh the positives in my opinion.
     
  9. Ritchie

    Ritchie Member

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    I think it really depends on context and why he is recommending it, that said Peat does tend to contradict himself at times. However, I believe this occurs when his advice is taken out of context as is often the case. Sometimes many things get lost in translation.
     
  10. EIRE24

    EIRE24 Member

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    I cant eat liver at this present moment due to being too hypo. I get an awful reaction to it. I think its too much Vitamin A but that doesnt mean in time when I improve thyroid status and metabolism I wont be adding it in. I think if you are metabolically in the right place then definitely try and eat liver.
     
  11. tara

    tara Member

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    I agree that Peat recommends a serving only ~ once a week, and that he suggests too much can overwhelm the thyroid function.
    Being hypothyroid seems to be a pretty common issue. Personally, I 've had aversions and orange tinge to skin associated with orange vegetables, so I limit them and don't rely on my ability to get adequate vit A from vegetable sources. I don't think I'm the only one here with that issue.

    I figure there are many positives from having a small regular amount of liver that for many of us probably outweigh the negatives, and that it makes sense not to over do it. I wouldn't recommend forcing it against a bad physical reaction.

    Personally, because I know that I can enjoy and even crave liver sometimes, and other times I feel that I've had enough and don't want more, I'm choosing to follow my taste and intuition on it.

    For those who have not found a way to eat it that they can enjoy/tolerate, it's hard to know if this is just because they haven't yet learned how to prepare it in a way that tastes good to them, or they've been get poor quality/stale produce, or because they have some conditioned reaction against it, or whether, on the other hand, it represents a meaningful intuition about it's nutritional content that is telling them accurately that it will be unhelpful to eat it at that time.

    In terms of sorting that out, I figure that trying repeatedly to find tasty ways to eat it, using several different recipes, and not over doing it, comes before rejecting it. Eg trying a different liver recipe once a week or once a fortnight or once a month at least 10 times. Because that's how long it can take to acquire a taste for a new food.
     
  12. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    As compared to what?
     
  13. mayweatherking

    mayweatherking Member

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    b vitamins.. none in dairy
     
  14. Ritchie

    Ritchie Member

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    Are you aware of the negative health implications in consuming dense iron content foods, that Peat and plenty of other scientific literature extensively talks about and concludes? Same goes for foods high in tryptophan. And methionine. There is also extensive research illustrating the risks in consuming too much vitamin A (of which liver is extremely high). Further, vitamin A is accumulative so consuming it regularly as part of ones general diet may be risky in terms of overloading your own liver with vitamin A and thus negatively impacting thyroid and metabolism, along with the metabolism of the other fat solubles. Of course if the context calls for it, sure it may be useful. But it would be wise for someone to ask themselves what this context may be..

    I think that much effort in trying to stomach any food is a red flag. Again, if in context and treating it as a medicine of sorts, sure perhaps it can be useful. However, as mentioned previously, it comes with negatives that Peat warns of extensively in his literature.
     
  15. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    As compared to what?
     
  16. Ritchie

    Ritchie Member

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    Umm not sure what you mean... As compared to food that is not high in iron and tryptophan etc of which there are too many to list haha just look into it
     
  17. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    I have looked into it...
     
  18. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    As compared to pea protein powder??... hahaha :D
     
  19. Ritchie

    Ritchie Member

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    Maybe, depending on what you are using it for.. I personally don't supplement protein with powder apart from in certain circumstances. You may and many do. But I think it's important to think for yourself when it comes to Peat and in doing so deconstruct his ideas down to the fundamentals and then work up from there: i.e. Avoid PUFA, avoid foods high in iron, avoid foods high in tryptophan, aim for a diet that has a good calcium to phosphorus ratio, eat mainly foods high in carbohydrates (fruits, sugars, potatoes etc), coconuts/coconut oil for a good fat source and so forth.. Clearly based on this, muscle meats and liver should be avoided, unless you have a real need for something they can provide within context in a certain situation or circumstance..
     
  20. Ritchie

    Ritchie Member

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    OK :thumbup:
     
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