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Best Bulbs To Use? Alternatives To Incandescents

Discussion in 'Light' started by ecstatichamster, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    Twisties (CFLs)...LED...

    Incandescents are harder to get now...
     
  2. achillea

    achillea Member

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    Since the invention of the light bulb, humans have had a source of blue light after dark.

    Now with the widespread use of fluorescent and LED lighting, we have massive exposures to blue light at the wrong time of day. Every time you look at your bright blue LED TV, computer, or smartphone, your brain thinks that it is noon. If your brain thinks that it is noon, then melatonin production will be suppressed, and it will be difficult to sleep. This is why sleep quality can dramatically improve when you go camping, or live out in a rural area away from light pollution. If you live in a densely populated area, there are still things you can do to improve the quality of your sleep.

    During the day, you want to spend as much time as you can under natural sunlight. Exposure to natural sunlight in the morning can help set the circadian rhythm (note: glasses and contacts will block UV light, which is important for signaling melatonin production). When indoors, choose incandescent or halogen light bulbs instead of fluorescent and LED. Fluorescent and LED lights emit an unnaturally high blue to red light ratio, while incandescent and halogen lights create a fuller spectrum of light, closer to that of the sun.

    Sophia Heath Institute
     
  3. lisaferraro

    lisaferraro Member

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    I use halogen. They make bulbs that externally (shape wise) look like incandescent bulbs. I like them good lighting. Actually similar to the incandescent.
     
  4. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    +1 on halogen.
     
  5. schultz

    schultz Member

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    I was researching LED's a while back quite extensively. It's a little difficult to find nice bright LED bulbs, with a good spectral curve, that have an e26 base. One problem with LED's is that the spectral curve is not always fluid and tends to peak rapidly at different spots (like blue spectrum for example). I remember thinking some of the so-called "vintage" bulbs had decent spectral curves. The problem with those are that they tend to have low lumens and sometimes the CRI is low (which makes me suspicious). Orange/red spectrum reduces the brightness of the bulb so manufacturers like to add in some blue to increase "efficiency", or watt to lumen ratio. I think art gallery's like to avoid big blue spikes since they can fade paint and such, so there might be some good LED bulbs out there. The tech is a bit new and there is a lot of bad quality stuff out there currently.

    I use incandescents in rooms that I sit in for a long time and then in rooms where I tend not to stay very long (hallways, bathroom) I use LED's. I have a 500w incandescent in my living room and kitchen. It's pretty big, but at night it's almost like the sun is shining into the house. It's really nice.
     
  6. robknob

    robknob Member

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    [​IMG]
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    Low K LEDs aren't too bad, halogens and incandescents are best if affordable. Hopefully nanotech will make good graphene+vapor deposited crystal LEDs to emit any combination of spectrums, should be possible in the future, plain graphene is pretty good on its own spectrum wise, and potentially very cheap.
     
  7. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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  8. Sucrates

    Sucrates Member

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    Just bought a 400W halogen lamp.
     
  9. mr.mag

    mr.mag Member

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  10. achillea

    achillea Member

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    LED lights are receivers and transmitters of microwaves according to Anthony Patch editor of Entangled Magazine. He is a technology investigator.

    Anthony Patch - Home
     
  11. mr.mag

    mr.mag Member

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    please explain
     
  12. xborg

    xborg Member

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    ~60 lumens / watt , so about 60-70% as efficient as LED
    large UV output
    likely a strong source of EMF pollution
    more complex electronics than LED
    they compare themselves to cold white LED to look better
    no history of reliability

    Nice idea but I think warm white LED is a much better choice.
     
  13. mr.mag

    mr.mag Member

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    ahh so - thanx
     
  14. Daniel11

    Daniel11 Member

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    These look really good, nice warm 2700k light , they emit a very good spectrum of wavelengths for general home lighting, interesting technology, i'm going to get some, thanks!
     
  15. Sucrates

    Sucrates Member

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    Looks interesting at first glance. I wonder if there are negative effects from that violet peak though. I'm not suggesting that there are but I'd look into it if I was thinking of getting these.
     
  16. Daniel11

    Daniel11 Member

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    I don't think that they have such a big peak in the violet spectrum as that they figured out how to remove a lot of the blue light so there is a big gap between the violet and the warmer wavelengths, very unique lightbulb, i look forward to trying.

    Sunlight has violet wavelengths, its about balance, the violet wavelengths may be helpful for treating depression, combined with the large amount of light in the red spectrum the bulb emits, they may be really good for some people, the only way to know for sure is get one and try it for a while.

    Halogens peak 600 nm but they give off most their energy in the infrared spectrums, they may not be best choice for every day long term use, i would choose incandescent over halogen bulbs. Incandescent lights bulbs also have abundance of energy in the infrared spectrum, but incandescent bulbs have a better balance of the visible light spectrum peaking in the warm red wavelengths.

    Of course we are talking about general home lighting here, not photobiomodulation or LLLT where you hold your body close to the special spectrum tuned strong LED lights for short periods of time, those two different uses for light sometimes gets confused on some of these light threads.
     
  17. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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    do you have any studies or evidence that violent is helpful someone asked me and I couldn't find any info. If it as energetically intense as blue it should like uv being bad?
     
  18. OP
    ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    I ordered some to test. CRI of 80 is poor, making it difficult to see "honest" colors...it's a bit too "warm"...I'd like something more in the 3500K or 4000K range...
     
  19. biggirlkisss

    biggirlkisss Member

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    ya that the problem with led bulbs there cri is not as rich as incadnent or sunlight so the red is not rich which may be not as good and they also will have more blue. I have seen 97cri 500 watt leds for like 500 bucks 3000k but they are only double the lumen of incandescent. Higher cri seems like less lumens. I think a combo of long lasting incandnet bulbs or regular 130 volt with soild red led 100 or 200 watt is ideal for now.

     
  20. OP
    ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    yes @biggirlkisss you are exactly right. So, the "Finally" light bulb is not LED. And it is rich in red and low in blue. In theory it is a lot better. But I wish it had a bit more on the hotter part of the kelvin scale and then it would have a better CRI.
     
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