Aromatase Inhibitors Regenerate The Thymus In Aging Male Rats

Discussion in 'Articles & Scientific Studies' started by paymanz, Jan 13, 2016.

  1. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1521922

    Abstract

    The thymus can be regenerated in aging rats by surgical or chemical castration and regeneration is inhibited by testosterone, which may exert this effect, at least in part, through its conversion to estradiol. An attempt has been made to regenerate the thymus in intact aging rats using inhibitors of the aromatase system, in the hope that this maneuver could lead to the use of such chemical intervention in the treatment of immunodeficiency syndromes. Young adult and aging (18-month-old) male rats were orchidectomized under ether anesthesia and 7 days later given s.c. implants of testosterone in silicone elastomer (SILASTIC) tubing. Some rats received testosterone together with a five-fold excess of the aromatase inhibitor 1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione (ATD). One group of young intact rats received implants containing 25 mg ATD and a group of 18-month-old intact rats received 125 mg ATD or 25 mg of another, more powerful aromatase inhibitor 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (4-OH). On the 28th day after implanting, rats were killed and the thymus, spleen, prostate gland and seminal vesicles removed for weighing and histology. In addition, estrogen receptors were measured in the thymus. The thymus was enlarged after orchidectomy and greatly restored in aging rats. In aging rats, both aromatase inhibitors restored the thymus, which appeared normal histologically. In addition, ATD enlarged the thymus in young intact animals. Doses of testosterone which restored the accessory sex organs to weights measured in intact rats prevented the effects of orchidectomy on the thymus, and in old rats the effects of testosterone were blocked by ATD in both thymus and spleen. Available cytosolic estrogen receptors were reduced in thymus of testosterone-treated orchidectomized rats, and this effect blocked by ATD, which itself was apparently able to induce estrogen receptors. Receptors could not be detected in thymus from aging rats, but were measureable in cytosols from thymus of orchidectomized or ATD-treated old rats. It is therefore possible to restore the thymus in intact aging rats without recourse to surgical or chemical castration, and such a maneuver may possibly be of use to enhance an immune system weakened by aging or disease.
     
  2. Dopamine

    Dopamine Member

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  3. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Years ago I found one that used red light but it got lost in the ethers.
     
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