Should I just eat yeast?

Discussion in 'Messtafarian' started by messtafarian, Jul 2, 2015.

  1. messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    Messages:
    814
    I can only assess that I've been poisoned by antibiotics at this point and this is bad news since the quinolones tend to block and mangle mtDNA; which is probably why I have all these multi-symptom problems lately including nervous system anomalies. I've been doing a lot of Peat things and taking mitochondrial support and I'm not sure if I ever will be "back to normal" again.

    But I was thinking about this last night. The issue with antibiotic poisoning is mitochondrial damage. They are "broad spectrum" - -meaning they kill any type of eukaryotic cell they happen to find. Our mitochondria is actually sort of an ancient eukaryotic cell, and if enough of these have been poisoned we start to fail because of a loss of ATP.

    So...I started thinking...well...what I need is new mtDNA. More Mtdna -- the fresh kind you'd get, say, from stem cells.

    What else has eukaryotic cells? That I could put in me without like going outside and eating dirt?

    YEAST.

    I was also thinking about how RP's dad cured his diabetes with brewers's yeast and we understand this in terms of a solid influx of b vitamins and cofactors. But people are now starting to call diabetes a mitochondrial disease and what if the real reason it fixed his diabetes was because it was sort of a primitive "stem cell transplant"?

    So then I put this in the searchbox: " Mitochondrial Disease Brewer's Yeast."

    And I got this:

    http://gerson-research.org/docs/CopeFW-1981-1/

    What do y'all think about that?
     
  2. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2013
    Messages:
    7,367
    Do you really think eating a steak would be any different?
     
  3. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    Messages:
    814
    I don't know.

    One of the big arguments about probiotics is that when you put them into the environment of the stomach all the "live cultures" end up dead anyway. Yeast is one organism that does not seem to have that problem. It also has mtdna. A "dead" chunk of steak also has mtdna but would it actually make it into the bloodstream and be enough to counteract internal mutated mitochondria?
     
  4. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2013
    Messages:
    7,367
  5. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    Messages:
    814
    Hm. Maybe I need some Soylent Green...
     
  6. tara

    tara Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Messages:
    10,270
    Gender:
    Female
    The apparently successful brewers yeast treatments are with dead yeast powder. Peat recommends drinking a decanted hot water extract. I doubt either would have much useful Mtdna that your cells would know what to do with.
    I reckon the brewers yeast decoction could be worth a try, but not for that reason.
     
  7. goodandevil

    goodandevil Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2015
    Messages:
    978
    I think it's a brilliant hypothesis, and I enjoyed the explanation.
     
  8. aguilaroja

    aguilaroja Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    835
    I have also heard Dr. Peat mention of water extracts of brewer's yeast, or wheat germ, to get the soluble B vitamins as a beverage. Dr. Peat has expressed concern about brewer's yeast due to the relatively high phosphorous content. He mentions other cautions in this passage, which mention the circumstance where his father was helped.

    http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/diabetes.shtml
    (emphasis added)

    "Brewer's yeast has been used successfully to treat diabetes. In the 1930s, my father had severe diabetes, but after a few weeks of living on brewer's yeast, he recovered and never had any further evidence of diabetes. Besides its high B-vitamin and protein content, yeast is an unusual food that should be sparingly used, because of its high phosphorous/calcium ratio, high potassium to sodium ratio, and high estrogen content."
     
Loading...