Powdered milk - toxic?

Discussion in 'Milk' started by BobbyDukes, May 22, 2015.

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  1. BobbyDukes

    BobbyDukes Member

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    Adding powdered milk to skimmed milk (to bump it up to 30g of protein, per sitting) really increases my body heat, and energy. If I add sugar, it increases my 'perceived' metabolisn significantly. It can really dampen the water content of skimmed milk (which I will piss out, clear as water, every couple of hours, if I drink it without powdered milk powder). I have to stand outside to cool down sometimes.

    Does anyone else here use powdered milk?

    Unfortunately, I cannot acquire any brands here in the UK, that doesn't come with vitamins D and A added. It is literally the most backward thing I have ever come across. Here in the UK, that ***t isn't added to our skimmed milk, but there is this massive rule that they absolutely MUST be added to skimmed milk powder. Errr, why?

    Anyway, I am not too bothered by those added vitamins. I seem to tolerate the powder ok.

    Are there any other concerns with milk powder, though? I love the fact it has favourable calcium/phosphorus ratio and, unlike gelatin, it actually has very decent nutrients, to feed the increase in metabolism. Adding milk powder, means my calcium intake has gone way up and I have for sure noticed clear benefits.

    Is it a dangerous food, though? I'm sure Peat warned about the tryptophan in it being potentially dangerous, due to how it is manufacturerd (oxidized). If that is the case, I might resort back to gelatin, and start using calcium carbonate again, alongside energin and estroban, for extra nutrients.

    Anyone here use it as a staple? And does it concern them?
     
  2. Dean

    Dean Member

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    I have been using it as a staple for a few months now. I was doing up to 4 cups a day in water and sugar to make something like sweetened, less condensed milk. It agrees with me better than any of the fresh, liquid milks I've ever tried. It and Fage yogurt has finally enabled me to get my protein up.

    Here in the last few days, I've dialed it back to 2 cups of powdered milk and have been mixing it with skim or 1% and some sugar. Too early to say for sure, but the addition of the powdered milk seems to be helping me tolerate the fresh, liquid milk. I also prefer the milkier taste and helps me (with my slow metabolism) from having to deal with too much liquid, but still get sufficient protein and calcium, and keep my calcium:phosphorus ratio optimal.

    I'm pretty sure Peat has been quoted as saying 100g/day can be beneficial (or something along those lines), though he obviously prefers and first recommends fresh milk.
     
  3. tara

    tara Member

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    I think Peat has said that there is likely to be damage to the proteins from dehydration, and that that is not good. I think he has said it is good food to store for emergencies, but doesn't recommend it generally as a staple. It is included in his icecream recipe, though.

    An alternative would be to condense your own milk, as Mittir reported doing. That would be more effort, though, so it's a trade off.

    Personally, I'd think that if it is giving you a bunch of obvious positive effects, that trumps the possible down sides.
    It has got a lot going for it, too, as you say - lactose, protein, calcium etc in a palatable high density form.
    I'd be eating lots of it if it agreed with me.
     
  4. Dean

    Dean Member

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    [Powdered milk] It's not as good as fresh milk, or cheese, but when they aren't available, 100 grams (or more) would be a good addition to the diet, because of the high ratio of calcium to phosphate, as well as other nutrients.

    I pulled this from the "Peatarian Exchanges;" so yeah, not ideal...but it sure is convenient and agrees with me better then fresh milk for some reason. Originally, I was mixing it in water, but now am able to mix the powdered milk into fresh milk. So, maybe fresh milk/ Mittir's condensed milk is ready to agree with me.

    What are we talking? Just boiling the h out of fresh milk until it reduces down to the desired level of liquid? Definitely wouldn't be as convenient, but would give it a try. From my past experience though of making the homemade cheese by heating milk and adding vinegar, you are going to need to coat the heck out of the bottom of the pan with fat to save a nightmare of a clean-up with the pot afterwards.

    edit: are the proteins undamaged by pasteurization or homogenization or reducing it by boiling?
     
  5. tara

    tara Member

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    I think Mittir condensed milk in a double boiler to avoid burning.
    I think pasteurisation does reduce some milk benefits, but it also reduces some risks - that's the raw milk trade-off. There may be some more change to the milk from prolonged heating, but I gather it is much less than by completely dehydrating. I don't know if homogenisation modifies the proteins, but it definitely modifies the fat - I think it makes the fat into much smaller particles (so it stays mixed with the rest of the milk rather than float to the top).
     
  6. jyb

    jyb Member

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    It's surprisingly safe... You can (to some extent) forget about the expiration date or leaving too long at room temp - its bacteria prevents the bad bacteria from invading, unlike the putrefying store milk. I don't think those who drink it experience a problem in their lifetime provided it's from a normal quality farm selling raw milk.
     
  7. tara

    tara Member

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    We had some cases locally of some slip ups in raw milk production or handling that saw quite a few people get sick. I believe it's relatively rare when the producers are careful.
    I agree that pasteurised milk can get pretty disgusting, sometimes before the BB date.
     
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