Meditation And Carbon Dioxide

Ray-Z

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
321
In this post, I will share a few observations about meditation's effect on metabolism. I am not writing to advocate meditation (although I think it can help many people), but to relate it to Ray Peat's work.

I apologize in advance for the length of this post.

Meditation is an ancient practice for reducing stress, disciplining the mind, and increasing awareness and understanding. Meditation is commonly associated with Buddhism and the religions of India, but is used by people of many different philosophical or religious traditions. The forms of meditation I know are practical rather than mystical or other-worldly, and require no particular beliefs about anything.

There are many forms of meditation with different purposes. One of the most common varieties is called the mindfulness of breathing. In this form of meditation, the meditator simply pays attention to her breath. She relaxes her body and then focuses her attention on the breath at a particular location in her body (say the abdomen or the nose) and watches it flow in and out. Every time her mind wanders (as it inevitably and oh-so-frequently does) she simply lets go of the distracting thought or sensation and -- without judging or criticizing herself -- returns her attention to the breath. If her mind wanders 1,000 times, she returns to the breath 1,000 times.

Years ago, I noticed that interesting things happened to my body after roughly 30-40 minutes of practicing the mindfulness of breathing. My hands and feet warmed up. My breathing gradually slowed, and sometimes stopped for significant intervals. My breath became faint, and the volume of air entering my lungs dropped enough so that my abdomen and ribs barely moved as I breathed. Most interesting of all, these changes in my body mirrored changes in my mind. At the same time these physical changes occurred, distracting thoughts, emotions, and anxieties faded significantly, leaving mostly awareness of my breath, and sometimes a feeling of mild euphoria.

People familiar with the Buteyko method will immediately recognize what was happening to my breathing. To over-simplify, the Buteyko method of breathing entails: (A) breathing through the nose rather than the mouth; (B) breathing from the diaphragm (lower abdomen) rather than the chest; and (C) breathing as little as possible. I was already doing (A) and, to some extent, (B), but as I meditated, even though I had not yet encountered Buteyko, I naturally did all of (A)-(C). In other words, meditation naturally, and without any effort, leads to Buteyko breathing.

The central goal of the Buteyko method is to raise the amount of carbon dioxide in the blood. The sensations of warmth and euphoria I felt when meditating suggest that meditation, via its effect on breathing patterns (and likely also on stress hormones), increases retention of carbon dioxide!

My tentative conclusions:

(1) Buteyko breathing is the human body's default mode of breathing in the absence of physical and mental stress.

(2) Under the right circumstances, if continued long enough, meditation can induce Buteyko breathing and increase the body's retention of carbon dioxide, raising metabolism by the processes Ray Peat has described.

(3) By raising carbon dioxide levels, Peating should enable meditators to experience less distraction and greater peace and clarity during meditation.

(4) The states of calmness and relaxation that meditators cherish are states of high oxidative metabolism. (This statement is probably obvious to anyone who reads Peat, but is likely to be a big surprise to many meditators.)
 

Ray-Z

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
321
You may have heard stories about Tibetan monks who meditate outdoors or in caves. Some of these monks are reported to be able to melt significant amounts of snow and ice around them with their own body heat while they meditate. If these stories are true -- and I have heard them from sources I consider credible -- they are consistent with the idea that, at least in some circumstances, meditation can increase oxidative metabolism.
 

Ray-Z

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
321
Two clarifications...

First, I'm not saying that meditation's only (or even primary) benefit is to raise oxidative metabolism. I just thought it was worth describing this connection, since it's not widely discussed.

Second, I personally find meditation to be very difficult, and while I think it can be quite useful for many people, it is not a "magic bullet" for anxiety or medical problems. The benefits increase with your investment of time and effort.
 

kettlebell

Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2012
Messages
417
Location
UK
I have no doubt at all that certain forms of meditation massively increase metabolism. Breathing slows significantly as you relax and CO2 builds which further slows breathing. It summarises in my mind what a perfect metabolism should be like - A calm, focused, alert mind and a relaxed stress free body. When I say relaxed I dont mean Slow/sluggish/low metabolism etc.

Secondly there is a whole mass of scientific evidence showing clearly that various types of meditation significantly reduce stress levels across the board and enable us to cope better with stressful situations without triggering a stress response. Its all about stimulating and using the pre-frontal cortex more which leans towards a more positive outlook + really relaxing for a significant amount of time and reducing stress hormones encourages an oxidative metabolism. If done enough estrogen receptors will start to get switched off by progesterone production which shuts down the estrogen receptors permanently - The more you practice it the faster you help your body heal.

I used to meditate a lot and its amazing. I have just started again. Im only a week in so not seeing the benefits yet but give it another week or so and I will start feeling the positive effects.

In my opinion meditation is something everyone on the planet should do. 20 mins a day is very effective, not much time to dedicate to something that has so many benefits.
 

crX

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2012
Messages
66
I really like this thread. I have been practicing yoga for over a decade and, more recently, meditation. I totally see this connection with the breath. Seems like the ancients have known how to increase CO2 levels in the body without knowing exactly why it was beneficial, only that it works to calm the mind and body. I don't know, I'm thinking that this might be the exact mechanism that provides the benefit after all... It's wonderful when science seems to dovetail with ancient practice.
 

charlie

The Law & Order Admin
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
11,676
Location
USA
Ray-Z, this is such an important subject to me and as I see others too. Thank you so much for bringing it up. I have been meditating for 3 months now, and practicing mindfullness all day.

I just got in and am really tired so will try to add more to thread tomorrow.


Pinned. :ugeek:
 

pranarupa

Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2012
Messages
44
Oh Goddess, I love this subject.
Apologies seriously long post, this an article I've been putting together on pranayama and Ray Peat, feel free to move this somewhere else if needed.


Hatha Yoga Demystified

Pranayama, carbon dioxide, mitochondria, coherence, energy flow and individuation

yāvadvāyuḥ sthito dehe tāvajjīvanamuchyate |
maraṇaṃ tasya niṣhkrāntistato vāyuṃ nirodhayet || 3 ||

So long as the (breathing) air stays in the body, it is called life. Death consists in the passing out of the (breathing) air. It is, therefore, necessary to restrain the breath.

Hatha Yoga Pradipika

Some terms:
Bohr effect: haemoglobin’s oxygen binding capacity is inversely related to carbon dioxide concentrations, meaning that without CO2 oxygen cannot be released into tissues, as it cannot be released from the haemoglobin molecule.
Haldane effect: deoxygenation of the blood increases its capacity for carbon dioxide.
Mitochondria: cellular organelle, often considered the “energy factory” / “power plant” of the cell.

What could be more important to understand than biological energy? Thought, growth, movement, every philosophical and practical issue involves the nature of biological energy.”
-Ray Peat.

It is often claimed in Hatha yoga that pranayama is capable of curing all diseases, to a supposedly rational and sceptical westerner believing in such things as viral diseases, autoimmune diseases, and genetic diseases, this may seem an outrageous claim however there are reasons to believe that this claim is actually quite sound and entirely within the realms of scientific explanation, admittedly much of the science required to explain it draws on the work of scientists whose work has been marginalised by the corporate pseudoscience which has become the norm in today’s “civilisation”.
Many studies demonstrate an association between chronic hyperventilation / increased respiratory volumes and multiple diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, epilepsy. This hyperventilation increases the loss of carbon dioxide, which is far from being a waste product of respiration, the human organism in health maintains a carbon dioxide level of around 7%, atmospheric carbon dioxide is at 0.035%, an enormous difference.
One of the most easily identified mechanisms underlying these observations is inhibition of the Bohr effect, whereby haemoglobin’s oxygen binding capacity is inversely related to carbon dioxide concentrations, so high carbon dioxide concentrations produced as a result of efficient oxidative metabolism allows for oxygen release where it is needed, at least when the system is functioning in an organised manner. When someone hyperventilates they breathe out large amounts of carbon dioxide and inhibit the Bohr effect, paradoxically over breathing results in decreased cellular respiration, even though the blood may be carrying significant quantities of oxygen. This results in increased rates of glycolysis, an inefficient form of energy (ATP) production, resulting in the formation of lactic acid, this further exacerbates the situation as lactic acid appears to compete with carbon dioxide in the blood resulting in increased losses of carbon dioxide, whereas carbon dioxide inhibits lactate production, some of these effects are likely mediated through acid-base homeostasis (Cohen et al 1990). This is in many respects the respiratory pathology that Otto Warburg noted as the defining feature of cancer, aerobic glycolysis, the production of lactate in presence of oxygen.
This aerobic glycolysis is a fundamental respiratory defect, and occurs whenever the mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate is inhibited, and there are multiple agents capable of inhibiting this efficient energy production, however they all appear to function in fairly common manner, that is they stimulate inflammation, or cellular swelling and oedema. These agents include estrogen, histamine, bacterial endotoxin, polyunsaturated fatty acids, serotonin, and lactate itself. Anaerobic glycolysis occurring as a result of intense physical exertion is adaptive with those actions of lactate that could be considered pathological in other circumstances acting to assist in the organisms adaptation to the stress, for example lactate’s stimulation of angiogenesis (Hunt et al 2008) can be seen as a functional signal assisting in bring increased blood to an are undergoing adaptive growth, of course in other circumstances the signals involved, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and hypoxia-inducible factor (hif-1alpha) are all associated with such pathological conditions as cancer. However that represents a fundamentally out of control situation, in a state of health these signals of inflammation and dedifferentiation are inevitably calmed by the overall coherence of the organism and its environment, the fact that so many chronic inflammatory conditions have become so common today, should, if people were paying attention serve as a warning that our “civilization” is dangerously incoherent.

Ok, so how does this swelling inhibit mitochondrial respiration and what does this have to do with pranayama?

To explain that we are going to have to look at some alternate models of cell physiology. Much of this article draws upon the ideas presented in works such as Mae Wan Ho’s The Rainbow and the Worm (2008), Gerald Pollack’s Cells, Gels and the Engines of Life (2001), and of course the work of Ray Peat. All three present a view of physiology and the organism that is massively interconnected doing away with ideas such as the interactions of enzymes and substrates through processes of random diffusion, and models of ion partitioning that require fatty membranes with ever increasing membrane channels and pumps that according to some estimates simply cannot be provided with enough energy to function as they are claimed to based on current popular models, even when the cell’s energy has been depleted through metabolic poisons and oxygen deprivation for 8 hours, no changes in sodium or potassium could be detected (Pollack 2001). Instead of the bizarre infernally complex mechanistic “biological” models currently popular with interactions mediated through specific lock and key mechanisms, diseases often being seen as defects in very specific mechanisms. An alternative presents a model wherein intracellular (and extracellular) water is structured by its electronic interactions with proteins into gel-like liquid-crystalline arrays.
When the cell swells inappropriately this liquid crystalline matrix is disrupted, and communication and energy flow through the cell is also disrupted, mitochondria are left unable to function and the cell is left with no choice but to produce ATP (typically thought of as the energy molecule) via glycolysis. Within this model a commonality in disease origin is this disruption of structure and coherence and the concomitant inhibition of energy flow.
One area where the liquid crystalline nature of the living substance is readily apparent is the lens of the eye, where coherent structure is absolutely essential to its biological function, evidence for the interaction of coherence and metabolically efficient energy flow can be seen in studies demonstrating increased lactate in cataracts (areas of opacity within the lens), suggesting that interference in energy flow disrupts structure and / or disrupted structure inhibits energy flow resulting in the more primitive glycolytic metabolism, the disrupted structure decreases transparency, further cataracts are less common at higher altitudes suggesting the possible involvement of the Haldane effect and increased retention of carbon dioxide caused by the decreased oxygen at high altitude (Brandt et al 1982).
Ray Peat suggests that the effect carbon dioxide has on haemoglobin, the conformation change that allows for the release of oxygen into tissues is a general electronic effect, and that carbon dioxide is capable of acting similarly on other proteins, that in the words of Gilbert Ling carbon dioxide is a “cardinal adsorbent”, that is a substance exerting a powerful controlling influence on the protein conformation and the associated water structure, acting to structure water in the cell eliminating swelling and oedema, restoring order and coherence to the excited cell.
Evidence for carbon dioxide’s capacity to act in way that restores order and coherence to the cellular structure can be seen in its capacity to protect the brain from hypoxia (Vannucci et al. 1995), inhibit formation of ROS (Kogan et al. 1997), stabilise mast cells inhibiting histamine release (Strider et al. 2010), stabilising nerve cells (Krnjevic et al. 1965), its inhibition of lactate formation (Cohen et al. 1990). These attributes (especially the inhibition of ROS and lactate) suggest that carbon dioxide is acting to optimize energy production, preventing electron leakage during redox reactions, favouring efficient oxidative metabolism. Carbon dioxide has many other actions too numerous to list here but it is interesting that Yandell Henderson (1940) referred to it as “the chief hormone of the entire body”.
If the cancer cell is used as a paradigmatic example of a cell in a disordered chaotic condition, wherein the swelling characteristic of this disorder is produced by its overly reduced state (having an excess of electrons, and hence being alkaline), carbon dioxide is capable of acting as a Lewis acid and withdrawing electrons from the excited proteins, the oxygen delivery increased by carbon dioxide also resolves this condition by restoring healthy oxidative metabolism.
Further evidence for the centrality of carbon dioxide as a fundamental mediator of the life force can be seen in its essentiality for organisms that can survive without oxygen, but who become incapable of multiplication when deprived of carbon dioxide (Rahn 1941), this suggests that carbon dioxide may be more fundamental to life than oxygen.
Ray Peat in the article Mitochondria and Mortality suggests that carbon dioxide acts in some way to call mitochondria into existence, suggesting the possibility that carbon dioxide through its alteration of the shape and electrical affinities of haemoglobin and other proteins, increases the stability of the mitiochondrial coacervate, causing it to recruit additional proteins from its environment and its own synthetic machinery to grow or multiply. To support this proposition Peat points to the effects of increased thyroid hormone and the effects of high altitude on increasing mitochondria, thyroid acting to increase metabolism and hence increasing carbon dioxide production and high altitude acting via the Haldane effect whereby deoxygenation of the blood increases its capacity for carbon dioxide.
If Peat is right and carbon dioxide does act to call mitochondria into existence then the implications for understanding the practice of pranayama are profound, whilst some hyperventilatory pranayamas exist (bhastrika and kapalabhati) in all the traditional texts of Hatha Yoga the emphasis is placed on hypoventilation:

yāvadvāyuḥ sthito dehe tāvajjīvanamuchyate |
maraṇaṃ tasya niṣhkrāntistato vāyuṃ nirodhayet || 3 ||

So long as the (breathing) air stays in the body, it is called life. Death consists in the passing out of the (breathing) air. It is, therefore, necessary to restrain the breath.

Hatha Yoga Pradipika

Then let the intelligent student close with his right thumb the pingala (the right nostril), inspire air through the Ida (the left nostril), and keep the air confined—suspend his breathing—as long as he can; and afterwards let him breathe out slowly, and not forcibly, through the right nostril.

Shiva Samhita


Many of the various pranayamas used in hatha yoga share a common factor they work in some way to slow and reduce standard unconscious breathing, for example nadi shodanna, alternates the breathing between each nostril and whilst this may produce additional subtle effects it acts to reduce airway size so slowing the rate at which air can be inhaled and exhaled, breath retention in general will serve to reduce breathing.
This hypoventilation will induce a mild hypercapnic condition (increased Carbon dioxide), this increased carbon dioxide will improve oxygen delivery throughout the body, through the Bohr effect as well as through carbon dioxide’s vasodilatory effects, stabilise nerve cells, decrease inflammation through a number of mechanisms including stabilising mast cells inhibiting histamine and serotonin release. Further if Ray Peat is correct potentially increasing mitochondria and hence increasing the adaptive energy available to an individual, this increased metabolic energy is available both physically and mentally, with greater energy available an individual is capable of a higher level of function. This increase in mitochondrial activity is capable of increasing production of various protective steroid hormones including the foundational hormones that are also neuroactive, pregnenolone, progesterone and DHEA as all of these are produced within the mitochondria. High levels of these hormones are associated with the fluid resiliency of youth, optimising mitochondrial function through pranayama should keep their production high, further there is reason to believe that when metabolism is optimum it is capable of setting up mutually reinforcing feedback loops, for example progesterone and pregnenolone can improve thyroid function, thyroid increases production of pregnenolone, progesterone and DHEA, massively increasing adaptive energy available that spontaneously heals disease and increases the overall coherence and energy available for realisation of one’s dharma.
Thyroid plays an essential role in stimulating oxidative metabolism and hence increasing C02, thyroid is capable of increasing mitochondria. Hypothyroidism results in physical and mental fatigue, compensatory increases in stress hormones such as adrenalin and cortisol.
In our present environment we have been exposed to numerous anti-metabolic agents that inhibit thyroid function, including estrogens (via pollution of water supplies from birth control pills as well as industrial xenoestrogens), fluoride, polyunsaturated fats, and radioactive pollution.
Thyroid appears to play a key role in differentiation, maturation and individuation, evidence for this can be seen in an experiment where tadpoles treated with T4 and T3 prematurely metamorphose into tiny frogs, whilst those that have been made hypothyroid simply become oversized tadpoles (Gudernatsch 1912).


References

Brandt F, Malla OK, Pradhan YM, Prasad LN, Rai NC, Pokharel RP, Lakhe S, (1982), Incidence of cataracts in the mobile eye hospitals of Nepal, Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol, 218:1, pp 25-7

Cohen Y, Chang L-H, Litt L, Kim F, Severinghaus JW, Weinstein PR, Davis RL, Germano I, James TL, (1990), Stability of Brain Intracellular Lactate and 31P-Metabolite Levels at reduced intracellular pH during prolonged hypercapnia in rats, J Cereb Blood Flow Metab, 10(2), pp 277-284.

Gudernatsch JF, (1912), Feeding experiments on tadpoles I. The influence of specific organs given as food on growth and differentiation. A contribution to the knowledge of organs with internal secretion, Development Genes and Evolution, 35(3), pp 457-483.

Henderson Y, (1940), Carbon dioxide, Cyclopedia of Medicine 1940, available online at: http://members.westnet.com.au/pkolb/henders.htm last accessed on 12/7/2012.

Ho M-W, (2008), The Rainbow and the Worm: the physics of organisms 3rd Edn, World Scientific, Singapore.

Hunt TK, Aslam R, Hussain Z, Beckert S, (2008), Lactate, with oxygen stimulates angiogenesis, Advances in experimental medicine and biology, 614(ii), pp 73-80.

Kogan AKh, Grachev SV, Eliseeva SV, Bolevich S, (1997), [Carbon dioxide, a universal inhibitor of the generation of active forms of oxygen by cells (deciphering one enigma of evolution)], Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol, Mar-Apr(2), pp 204-217.

Krnjevic K, Randic M and Siesjo B, (1965), Cortical CO2 tension and neuronal excitability, J of Physiol, 176(1), pp 105-122.

Laursen AB, (1976), Concentrations of some ribonucleotides, L-lactate, and pyruvate in human senile cataractous lenses with special reference to anterior capsular/subcapsular opacity, Acta Ophthalmologica, 54(6), pp 677-692.

Pollack GH, (2001), Cells, Gels and the Engines of Life: a new unifying approach to cell function, Ebner and Sons, Seattle.

Strider JW, Masterson CG, Durham PL, (2010), Treatment of mast cells with carbon dioxide suppresses degranulation via a novel mechanism involving repression of increased intracellular calcium levels, Allergy, 66(3), pp 341-350.

Rahn O, (1941), Protozoa need carbon dioxide for growth, Growth, 5, pp197-199.

Vannucci RC, Towfighi J, Heitjan DF, Brucklacher RM, (1995), Carbon dioxide protects the perinatal brain from hypoxic-ischaemic damage: an experimental study in the immature rat, Paediatrics, 95(6), pp 868-874.

Special Mention: the various works of Ray Peat many of which can be found at:
http://raypeat.com
 

Ray-Z

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
321
crX and Charlie: Thanks very much. Glad you are enjoying this topic.

kettlebell: Well said. I hope you enjoy your return to meditation.

pranarupa: Wow. Thank you. I have a little bit of experience with pranayama. My teachers emphasized the hyperventilatory techniques, so I had thought that pranayama would generally not help to retain CO2. I'm glad to see I was mistaken.
 

pranarupa

Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2012
Messages
44
Ray-Z, unfortunately thats a common problem, many yoga teachers lack physiological understanding or grounding in the traditional texts.

Also Ray Peat mentions frogs being found alive in old concrete and relates this to co2 retention, there are various stories of yogi being buried alive for a month or so and then being dug out perfectly well, and they relate this to mastery of pranayama.

Ray also discusses CO2's role in regeneration and one famous hatha yogi Chaurangi is said after 12 years of pranayama practice to have regenerated his hands and feet, they were cut off years before by a wicked stepmother.
 

charlie

The Law & Order Admin
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
11,676
Location
USA
Pranarupa, great article. Thank you!

The last couple of times I have meditated I have been having this feeling of being flipped upside down, and being twirled around. :confused Maybe even a slight out of body experience, I dunno. It's not scary, just a pretty profound feeling.

I actually am starting to crave meditating now. Like, I really need to have it.
 

nwo2012

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
1,107
We will just need to take more thyroid for the decrease in pulse from this mediation. Im onboard!
 

charlie

The Law & Order Admin
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
11,676
Location
USA
nwo, I was wondering about the pulse issue! I know my pulse lowers dramatically when meditating. But, the heat in my body also increases dramatically. Especially my hands.
 

kettlebell

Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2012
Messages
417
Location
UK
Charlie said:
nwo, I was wondering about the pulse issue! I know my pulse lowers dramatically when meditating. But, the heat in my body also increases dramatically. Especially my hands.

I don't think that a lowering in pulse during meditation would necessarily be an issue. You are still promoting a very oxidative metabolism with the breathing and increased carbonic acid (CO2 in the blood).

Im not sure if many knew this (I didn't) but a stressed and excited cell is alkaline, but it releases lactate and when a cell is relaxed it is acidic (CO2 is carbonic acid in the body). When you do bag breathing you significantly increase the acidity of your blood Carbonic acid, - which is released as CO2 from the lungs. Also eating "alkaline" foods - Cheese, milk etc in promoting an oxidative metabolism are actually increasing the acidity of the blood and the alkaline minerals in those foods (Magnesium, sodium, potassium, calcium etc) keep that acidity in check by promoting oxidative exchange at the cell.

So, keeping cells acidic(With CO2) ensures what is outside the cell is not acidic. When a cell becomes stressed and alkaline it secretes lactic acid causing the localised inflammation.

I learned that from a Ray Peat interview last night. Cant remember which one mind :?
 

nwo2012

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
1,107
kettlebell said:
Charlie said:
nwo, I was wondering about the pulse issue! I know my pulse lowers dramatically when meditating. But, the heat in my body also increases dramatically. Especially my hands.

I don't think that a lowering in pulse during meditation would necessarily be an issue. You are still promoting a very oxidative metabolism with the breathing and increased carbonic acid (CO2 in the blood).

Im not sure if many knew this (I didn't) but a stressed and excited cell is alkaline, but it releases lactate and when a cell is relaxed it is acidic (CO2 is carbonic acid in the body). When you do bag breathing you significantly increase the acidity of your blood Carbonic acid, - which is released as CO2 from the lungs. Also eating "alkaline" foods - Cheese, milk etc in promoting an oxidative metabolism are actually increasing the acidity of the blood and the alkaline minerals in those foods (Magnesium, sodium, potassium, calcium etc) keep that acidity in check by promoting oxidative exchange at the cell.

So, keeping cells acidic(With CO2) ensures what is outside the cell is not acidic. When a cell becomes stressed and alkaline it secretes lactic acid causing the localised inflammation.

I learned that from a Ray Peat interview last night. Cant remember which one mind :?

I meant it more tongue-in-cheek than anything. Great thread and posts, I havent been doing it lately as didnt think of it as part of Peating but it fits very well really. CO2 FTW!
 

nwo2012

Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
1,107
kettlebell said:
Apologies Nwo! I missed that as I had a bamgimg headache earlier Andensetron induced.

Not at all, I missed the smiley so not so obvious until you know me better.
Ive tried Ondansetron a few times. No headaches fortunately but did not improve my sleep so stopped taking it (4mg before bed). Would love to try naltrexone but have no access to it, controlled import in Oz. :(
 

pranarupa

Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2012
Messages
44
Don't know if this is the appropriate place for this but I've just started a blog:

http://pranarupa.wordpress.com/

the article I posted above is on there with a few changes, plus another article heavily influenced by Ray Peat, I'm not sure how active it'll be long term but I've got a few ideas, for the short term.
 

Ray-Z

Member
Thread starter
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
321
pranarupa said:
Don't know if this is the appropriate place for this but I've just started a blog:

http://pranarupa.wordpress.com/

the article I posted above is on there with a few changes, plus another article heavily influenced by Ray Peat, I'm not sure how active it'll be long term but I've got a few ideas, for the short term.

Great. Thanks for letting us know, pranarupa. :mrgreen:
 

charlie

The Law & Order Admin
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
11,676
Location
USA
pranarupa said:
Don't know if this is the appropriate place for this but I've just started a blog:

http://pranarupa.wordpress.com/

the article I posted above is on there with a few changes, plus another article heavily influenced by Ray Peat, I'm not sure how active it'll be long term but I've got a few ideas, for the short term.

I have added you to the links list on the front page. :ugeek:
 

cliff

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2012
Messages
425
Age
32
Location
Los Angeles
if pulse goes down with meditation maybe that's a sign of high adrenaline?
 
Similar threads
Thread starter Title Forum Replies Date
AlexR Bill Gates, Real-Life Supervillain, Says Meditation Is His New Favorite Habit (2018) Mental Issues 30
AlexR Meditation Is a Psychological Stressor and Should Not Be Recommended Mental Issues 66
Velve921 Meditation - I Would Like People's Feedback Ask For Help or Advice 16
L What's The Verdict On Meditation From A Bioenergetic Perspective? Meditation, Mindfullness, Religion, Spirituality 27
L Replacing Sleep With Meditation Logs 4
D Meditation Is Being Warped & Perverted By New-Agers Meditation, Mindfullness, Religion, Spirituality 57
L Long-Term Meditation Drastically Decreases TSH, GH, Cortisol, And Prolactin While Increasing T3 Meditation, Mindfullness, Religion, Spirituality 70
vulture CO2: Yoga, Meditation And Slow Breathing CO2, Bag Breathing 0
S Meditation Annoys Me Ask For Help or Advice 15
B Some Skeptical Thoughts On Meditation Meditation, Mindfullness, Religion, Spirituality 100
DaveFoster Theanine Instead Of Meditation haidut 18
TurtleNeck Meditation For Anxiety? Mind, Sleep, Stress 9
goodandevil "Gods Of Tbe New Age"- Meditation Debunked Meditation, Mindfullness, Religion, Spirituality 2
charlie Solid High-Carbon Steel For Cooking? What Say You? Cookware, Microwave 22
md_a Yandell Henderson CARBON DIOXIDE Altitude, Bag Breathing, CO2, Light, Weather 1
S Activated carbon cookware safe? Ask For Help or Advice 0
ecstatichamster Tell Me About Your Carbon Dioxide Tank And Mask Set Up Ask For Help or Advice 5
md_a Protective Role Of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) In Generation Of Reactive Oxygen Species Scientific Studies 0
md_a COVID-19 And Carbon Monoxide Articles & Scientific Studies 24
md_a Ray Peat On Carbon Dioxide Ray Peat Quotes 0
md_a Ray Peat On Carbon Monoxide Ray Peat Quotes 0
Ficini Cholesterol - Vitamin D - Carbon Dioxide As Markers For Metabolism Blood Work, Labs 20
meatbag World In Midst Of Carbon Drought (w/ Prof. William Happer, Princeton University) Political Talk, Alternative World Theories 0
T Carbon Dioxide & Sauna Metabolism 2
Such_Umami Does Your Body Have A Carbon Dioxide Reserve? Ask For Help or Advice 7
H Electric Vehicles In Germany Emit More Carbon Dioxide Than Diesel Vehicles CO2, Bag Breathing 38
milkboi Company That Wants To Stop Climate Change By Sucking Carbon Dioxide Out Of The Atmosphere CO2, Bag Breathing 10
D Carbon C60 Male Issues 0
T Carbon Dioxide And Anxiety CO2, Bag Breathing 9
haidut Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Therapy Reduces Belly Fat In Humans Scientific Studies 44
W Carbon Dioxide Metabolism 16
yerrag The Many Ways To Get Carbon Dioxide - Do Effects Differ And How? CO2, Bag Breathing 26
R Lower Carbon Dioxide Levels Implied Better Sleep Depth, Sleep Efficiency, And Lesse Scientific Studies 4
M Carbon Dioxide In Carbonated Beverages Induces Ghrelin Release And Increased Food Consumption Scientific Studies 6
yerrag Do Fish Also Need Carbon Dioxide As Much As We Do? Animals 11
L Food-nutrients-carbon-dioxide Articles & Scientific Studies 0
Dan Wich Carbon Dioxide, Pre-Mature Aging & Hair Loss Podcast Episode Danny Roddy 0
Mito Carbon Dioxide - Carbs Vs Fat Oxidation CO2, Bag Breathing 6
biggirlkisss Carbon Moxiade Breathe Reader At 0.01ppm Ask For Help or Advice 0
Drareg RETRACTED: Liver Conversion Of Docosahexaenoic And Arachidonic Acids From Their 18-carbon Precursors Scientific Studies 0
D Carbon Dioxide And Human Health - Doubts Altitude, Bag Breathing, CO2, Light, Weather 17
S Indigo Child Speaks About Carbon Dioxide And Oxygen Meditation, Mindfullness, Religion, Spirituality 23
K Where Was "Energy, Structure, And Carbon Dioxide" Originally Published? Need Citation Ray Peat Quotes 2
burtlancast PROJECT 15 (NON FULL): Ray Peat And Bud Weiss - The Biology Of Carbon Dioxide Interview Transcript Projects 2
cantstoppeating Generative Energy #26: Talking With Ray Peat #2: Carbon Dioxide, NAD+/NADH, Antibiotics, Coffee Generative Energy Podcast 22
burtlancast Carbon Monoxide, Kmud, 2013 Audio Interview Transcripts 3
D Carbon Monoxide, Anti -nitric Oxide Effect Miscellaneous Health Discussions 6
D Smoking Vs Nicotine. Is Either One A Good Solution? / Carbon Monoxide Ask For Help or Advice 68
P Carbon Dioxide Therapy In The Treatment Of Cellulite: An Audit Of Clinical Practice Articles & Scientific Studies 1
Hugh Johnson The Effect Of Ethanol On One-carbon Metabolism: Increased Methionine Catabolism And Lipotrope Methyl Articles & Scientific Studies 0

Similar threads

Top