High Salt Intake; Blood Pressure; Acidosis; Bone Health: Hypercortisolism

Discussion in 'Acidity vs. Alkalinity' started by Owen B, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. Owen B

    Owen B Member

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  2. Tristan Loscha

    Tristan Loscha Member

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    High sodium intake and high dietary or metabolic acid loading have two important things in common. Both induce a so called low grade metabolic acidosis, i.e., a moderate shift of blood pH and blood bicarbonate buffer to lower levels, usually still within the “normal healthy” range [8, 9]. The high renal sodium excretion following high NaCl ingestion causes an adaptive (renal physiological) reduction in tubular reabsorption of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), thus reducing our most important circulating buffer system NaHCO3. Corresponding NaHCO3 reductions also occur after dietary acid loading, i.e., through increases in potential renal acid loads (PRAL), biochemically measurable as renal NAE increases. The consequences of either form of low grade metabolic acidosis are increases in glucocorticoids, i.e., cortisol levels, as have been reported for high salt intake.
     
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