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Vitamin A may treat anosmia (loss of smell) due to COVID-19

haidut

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Joined
Mar 18, 2013
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19,198
Location
USA / Europe
Once again, evidence emerges that widely available, dirt-cheap interventions may be able to treat a condition for which mainstream medicine claims there is no available cure. Namely, one of the most persistent and "baffling" symptoms associated with current or past COVID-19 experience is anosmia - the partial or full loss of smell. Anosmia is actually a very common symptom of any viral infection, but the general public only became aware of this issue during the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been known since the 1960s that elevated serotonin is involved in the loss of smell and that anti-serotonin agents are therapeutic. It is now known that serotonin is heavily involved in the pathology of COVID-19 (and likely all other viral infections), yet doctors are afraid to discuss serotonin's role or offer anti-serotonin therapies in fear of "killing the hen that lays golden eggs" - i.e. the multi-billion dollar SSRI drug industry. Well, the studies below demonstrate that the loss of smell may be reversible by a simple regimen of putting 10,000 IU vitamin A daily in the nose, for 8 weeks. Considering most vitamin A products on the market are in the form of esters such as acetate or palmitate, the palmitate ester may be the way to go due to the acetate being potentially irritating to the nasal mucosa. If the vitamin A has been dissolved in tocopherols, the effect may be even stronger since anosmia is now known to involve lipid peroxidation and vitamin E can help with that, while also protecting vitamin A from peroxidation as the latter is just as vulnerable to this process as PUFA.
Intranasal vitamin A is beneficial in post-infectious olfactory loss - PubMed
NIHR Funding and Awards Search Website
Vitamin A Is Being Studied In The U.K. As A Potential Treatment To Covid Smell Loss

"...Vitamin A nose drops will be given to volunteer patients as part of a 12-week trial by the University of East Anglia (UEA), with the results compared to a group receiving a placebo of inactive drops. Previous research from Germany has “shown the potential benefit” of vitamin A in treating smell loss, UEA said, and the trial is designed to “explore how this treatment works to help repair tissues in the nose damaged by viruses.”

"...Philpott said around 1 in 10 Covid-19 patients who lost their sense of smell had not fully recovered four weeks after infection and said a “key problem” for patients and doctors is “the lack of proven effective treatments.” Philpott said the German study found that people treated with vitamin A “improved twice as much” as those who didn’t receive the treatment."
 

Nomane Euger

Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2020
Messages
1,309
Once again, evidence emerges that widely available, dirt-cheap interventions may be able to treat a condition for which mainstream medicine claims there is no available cure. Namely, one of the most persistent and "baffling" symptoms associated with current or past COVID-19 experience is anosmia - the partial or full loss of smell. Anosmia is actually a very common symptom of any viral infection, but the general public only became aware of this issue during the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been known since the 1960s that elevated serotonin is involved in the loss of smell and that anti-serotonin agents are therapeutic. It is now known that serotonin is heavily involved in the pathology of COVID-19 (and likely all other viral infections), yet doctors are afraid to discuss serotonin's role or offer anti-serotonin therapies in fear of "killing the hen that lays golden eggs" - i.e. the multi-billion dollar SSRI drug industry. Well, the studies below demonstrate that the loss of smell may be reversible by a simple regimen of putting 10,000 IU vitamin A daily in the nose, for 8 weeks. Considering most vitamin A products on the market are in the form of esters such as acetate or palmitate, the palmitate ester may be the way to go due to the acetate being potentially irritating to the nasal mucosa. If the vitamin A has been dissolved in tocopherols, the effect may be even stronger since anosmia is now known to involve lipid peroxidation and vitamin E can help with that, while also protecting vitamin A from peroxidation as the latter is just as vulnerable to this process as PUFA.
Intranasal vitamin A is beneficial in post-infectious olfactory loss - PubMed
NIHR Funding and Awards Search Website
Vitamin A Is Being Studied In The U.K. As A Potential Treatment To Covid Smell Loss

"...Vitamin A nose drops will be given to volunteer patients as part of a 12-week trial by the University of East Anglia (UEA), with the results compared to a group receiving a placebo of inactive drops. Previous research from Germany has “shown the potential benefit” of vitamin A in treating smell loss, UEA said, and the trial is designed to “explore how this treatment works to help repair tissues in the nose damaged by viruses.”

"...Philpott said around 1 in 10 Covid-19 patients who lost their sense of smell had not fully recovered four weeks after infection and said a “key problem” for patients and doctors is “the lack of proven effective treatments.” Philpott said the German study found that people treated with vitamin A “improved twice as much” as those who didn’t receive the treatment."
hello haidut,is there a way to personally message you or mail you?
 

haidut

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Thread starter
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hello haidut,is there a way to personally message you or mail you?

Sorry, I don't provide personal advice. That's why we have a forum - to ask everybody and not just one person.
 

Nomane Euger

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Sep 22, 2020
Messages
1,309
Sorry, I don't provide personal advice. That's why we have a forum - to ask everybody and not just one person.
Hi,i understand.its about a topic iam not willing to talk in public and iam not seeking for personal advice,rather you to provide me some studys that treat this topic and its very specific,a few things that you have talked about in podcasts,i would not ask if it wouldnt be of the highest importance
 

haidut

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Thread starter
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Messages
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Hi,i understand,its about a topic iam not willing to talk in public and iam not seeking for personal advic,rather you to provide me some studys that treat this topic and its very specific,a few things that you have talked about in podcast,i would not ask if it wouldnt be of the highest importance

This is very much giving personal advice - i.e. asking one person instead of many. It defeats the purpose of having a forum, because people rely on one person instead on the community in general. Again, that is not what I do or why I am here and I don't think it is wise to rely on the advice of any single person. As far as the topic being sensitive - most topics on the forum are, and since nobody here knows who you are it does not matter what you discuss in public as it cannot be linked back to your real-life identity.
 

Nomane Euger

Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2020
Messages
1,309
This is very much giving personal advice - i.e. asking one person instead of many. It defeats the purpose of having a forum, because people rely on one person instead on the community in general. Again, that is not what I do or why I am here and I don't think it is wise to rely on the advice of any single person. As far as the topic being sensitive - most topics on the forum are, and since nobody here knows who you are it does not matter what you discuss in public as it cannot be linked back to your real-life identity.
i dont think asking for specific studys about some phenomenons you mentionned in podcasts is asking for personal advice or opinions,iam not insisting btw,free to you,i just clarifyed.my member name is my real life identity.
 

Perry Staltic

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Joined
Dec 14, 2020
Messages
6,696
I wonder if the corollary is true: loss of smell is due in some part to vitamin A deficiency.
 

jay123

Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Messages
208
Once again, evidence emerges that widely available, dirt-cheap interventions may be able to treat a condition for which mainstream medicine claims there is no available cure. Namely, one of the most persistent and "baffling" symptoms associated with current or past COVID-19 experience is anosmia - the partial or full loss of smell. Anosmia is actually a very common symptom of any viral infection, but the general public only became aware of this issue during the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been known since the 1960s that elevated serotonin is involved in the loss of smell and that anti-serotonin agents are therapeutic. It is now known that serotonin is heavily involved in the pathology of COVID-19 (and likely all other viral infections), yet doctors are afraid to discuss serotonin's role or offer anti-serotonin therapies in fear of "killing the hen that lays golden eggs" - i.e. the multi-billion dollar SSRI drug industry. Well, the studies below demonstrate that the loss of smell may be reversible by a simple regimen of putting 10,000 IU vitamin A daily in the nose, for 8 weeks. Considering most vitamin A products on the market are in the form of esters such as acetate or palmitate, the palmitate ester may be the way to go due to the acetate being potentially irritating to the nasal mucosa. If the vitamin A has been dissolved in tocopherols, the effect may be even stronger since anosmia is now known to involve lipid peroxidation and vitamin E can help with that, while also protecting vitamin A from peroxidation as the latter is just as vulnerable to this process as PUFA.
Intranasal vitamin A is beneficial in post-infectious olfactory loss - PubMed
NIHR Funding and Awards Search Website
Vitamin A Is Being Studied In The U.K. As A Potential Treatment To Covid Smell Loss

"...Vitamin A nose drops will be given to volunteer patients as part of a 12-week trial by the University of East Anglia (UEA), with the results compared to a group receiving a placebo of inactive drops. Previous research from Germany has “shown the potential benefit” of vitamin A in treating smell loss, UEA said, and the trial is designed to “explore how this treatment works to help repair tissues in the nose damaged by viruses.”

"...Philpott said around 1 in 10 Covid-19 patients who lost their sense of smell had not fully recovered four weeks after infection and said a “key problem” for patients and doctors is “the lack of proven effective treatments.” Philpott said the German study found that people treated with vitamin A “improved twice as much” as those who didn’t receive the treatment."
Do you know if people have put Retinol in the nose as a drop. I would think the one with MCT would be the least invasive as to burning? I have not tasted or been able to smell since Dec. 19th, 2020. So I am game to try this!
 

Razvan

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Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
816
Location
Romania
Sorry, I don't provide personal advice. That's why we have a forum - to ask everybody and not just one person.
@haidut I would like to contact you not for advices,but to propose an idea for the idealabs business,since I'm from Romania and as you know I'm pretty near to Bulgaria and I would like to propose some ideas for it. Can you contact me or something?
 

bogbody

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
164
Hi @haidut just wanted to let you know that my husband has been struggling on and off with parosmia since he had covid and after seeing this I got him some retinil (the kind in tocopherols). He puts a drop in each nostril daily and says it has really helped. thanks!
 

A.R

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Joined
Oct 14, 2016
Messages
804
Do you know if people have put Retinol in the nose as a drop. I would think the one with MCT would be the least invasive as to burning? I have not tasted or been able to smell since Dec. 19th, 2020. So I am game to try this!
Have you managed to make any progress on healing your sense of smell?
 

jay123

Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Messages
208
Have you managed to make any progress on healing your sense of smell?
Not really. It's still basically the same. Very little smells. I mostly can smell smoke from a fire and that is about it. With taste, I really don't taste. I can feel salty and sweet. Notice I said feel. It hits the tongue in a feeling way but again no taste. It's been a long time. If you saw me you would think I am a beacon of health. 5 foot 10, 170 lbs and muscular build. But I don't really have 2 of my five senses. I trust that it will come back. And there is no way that I think this was some "virus". Definitely something conjured up by people. And they just threw every cold symptom on top to create mass fear and control. I only had a headache for about 4 hours, went to bed, woke up and no taste and smell. And that was December, 2020. Nothing else happened. Again, I trust it will come back again.
 

A.R

Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2016
Messages
804
Not really. It's still basically the same. Very little smells. I mostly can smell smoke from a fire and that is about it. With taste, I really don't taste. I can feel salty and sweet. Notice I said feel. It hits the tongue in a feeling way but again no taste. It's been a long time. If you saw me you would think I am a beacon of health. 5 foot 10, 170 lbs and muscular build. But I don't really have 2 of my five senses. I trust that it will come back. And there is no way that I think this was some "virus". Definitely something conjured up by people. And they just threw every cold symptom on top to create mass fear and control. I only had a headache for about 4 hours, went to bed, woke up and no taste and smell. And that was December, 2020. Nothing else happened. Again, I trust it will come back again.
What supplements have you used so far in a bid to fix this problem?
 

jay123

Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Messages
208
What supplements have you used so far in a bid to fix this problem?
Zinc, vitamin A, D3, Magnesium. I also tried all of the smell things with essential oils. I tried Lugol's iodine, lactoferrin, niacinamide, methylene blue, policosanols, and I'm probably missing some things too.
 

cs3000

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Joined
Jul 27, 2022
Messages
193
Location
UK
looks like vitamin A plays a key role in covid , preventing the rise in myeloid-derived suppressor cells that impair immunity
https://chrismasterjohnphd.substack.com/p/a-new-paradigm-for-severe-covid

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.01.30.21250844v1
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32514047/
The synthetic retinoid Am80 delays recovery in a model of multiple sclerosis by modulating myeloid-derived suppressor cell fate and viability - PubMed <- (T cell density increases and their viability is promoted, delaying the animal's recovery (delayed recovery in autoimmune condition as immunity was enhanced)). so MDSCs are good in autoimmune conditions due to the immunity suppression (want lower vit A) - but in general good to lower for enhanced immunity (want more vit a)
Therapeutic regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and immune response to cancer vaccine in patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer
Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major factors limiting the efficacy of immune therapy. In a clinical trial of patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) we tested the possibility that targeting MDSC can improve the induction of immune responses by a cancer vaccine. ... and arm C – vaccination in combination with MDSC targeted therapy with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA).
Vaccine alone did not affect the proportion of MDSC, whereas in patients treated with ATRA the MDSC decreased more than two-fold (p=0.02). Sequential measurements did not show positive p53 responses in any of the 14 patients from arm A. After immunization, only 3 out of 15 patients (20%) from arm B developed a p53-specific response (p=0.22). In contrast, in arm C 5 out of 12 patients (41.7%) had detectable p53 responses (p=0.012). The proportion of granzyme B positive CD8+ T cells was increased only in patients from arm C but not in arm B. Depletion of MDSC substantially improved the immune response to vaccination suggesting that this approach can be used to enhance the effect of immune interventions in cancer.


I wonder if acute use of more Vitamin A during onset would be any help though? - considering it takes a month+ to show elevations in blood when coming up from low levels
 
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