Spicy Foods? What's The Consensus?

Discussion in 'Diet' started by ScurveDream, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. ScurveDream

    ScurveDream Member

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    Don't see too much on the forums here regarding capsicum/capsaicin or "hot" foods like chilis, peppers, sauces, etc.

    Aside from maybe some indigestion or heartburn, spicy stuff generally isn't something I've noticed to have any big negative effect.

    What about long term? Daily use? Some cultures down endless spicy stuff regularly and don't have gut issues or serious health issues over years usually. But some people really seem to get messed up from a little hot foods and get sick and stuff.

    Does Ray Peat weigh in on this?

    Would be good to know more of the pros/cons/etc. spelled out better. I'm eating spicy sardines now.
     
  2. Arnold Grape

    Arnold Grape Member

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    Right?! You always hear about spicy foods making people sweat, in the most generic contexts imaginable— but nobody ever says that here.
     
  3. OP
    ScurveDream

    ScurveDream Member

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    I've only sweat when maybe eating ghost pepper chips (years back). But I think that is expected -- ghost peppers are one of the hottest peppers in the world.

    I also felt like it was burning my insides. But casually eating ghost peppers is an insane undertaking for many.

    I don't sweat with normal or lighter spicy foods like jalapeños or etc. Still would like to know more about it though and from good sources/studies but not sure where to find any.

    I have heard good things like spicy foods helping metabolism a pinch or fighting infection/disease (I think -- not sure though).
     
  4. schultz

    schultz Member

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    I enjoy spicy food from time to time. It's not something I would overthink personally.
     
  5. SOMO

    SOMO Member

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    -Chili/Hot Peppers contain Capsaicin increases Ca-influx in the cell, which is bad.

    -Black Pepper slows down the CYP450 system in liver, as does grapefruit, so black pepper is pro-estrogenic.

    -Bell Peppers/Sweet peppers lack capsaicin so they are safe.

    -Paprika, which is made from bell peppers is basically dry bell pepper powder and is not spicy.

    -Cumin and Black Cumin/Nigella Sativa is somewhat spicy but doesn't have the downsides of Capsaicin or Black Pepper.

    -Garlic is also spicy. If you mix garlic and cumin you can get a decent (not perfect) replacement for the other 2 spices.


    Basically all the arguments people make against aspirin - that it induces GI bleeding/gut irritation are actually what Capsaicin does. Capsaicin increases mucus in the intestines as a protective mechanism to vacate it from the bowels.


    (As an aside, I LOVE hot chilis/chili powder/jalapenos/Sriracha sauce/etc. I still consume them but less than I used to, because there is no doubt that they irritate the GI tract.)
     
  6. methylenewhite

    methylenewhite Member

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    Garan masala is supposed to heat you up. Any way chemical composition of even one type of a spice is complex. We are talking about mixes of many of them, cooking and interactions with other ingridients like fruits and veggies. Naturally found enzyme inhibitors makes it even more complex. Unpredictably chaotic interactions.
     
  7. Inaut

    Inaut Member

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    Gingerol is closely related to capsaicin. My favourite spice (and cinnamon but that’s not related in this discussing)
     
  8. OP
    ScurveDream

    ScurveDream Member

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    Well, regarding the stuff I've heard on spicy foods + longevity and/or health, there's this:

    Consumption of spicy foods and total and cause specific mortality: population based cohort study

    BBC NEWS | Health | How spicy foods can kill cancers


    Not really 100% for me, but it at least shows there can be some effect from it in some cases possibly. It seems some studies show correlations with spicy stuff (capsaicin-stuff in particular) in regular diets can supposedly help or are at least not highly-related to mortality causes because they're correlated with large-scale populations & lack of mortality rates of all causes, but also link consumption of capsaicin-foods to heightened chances of other cancers.

    For example this contradicting one that likens high spicy food intake with increased chances of gastric/stomach cancers, I think:

    High Spicy Food Intake and Risk of Cancer: A Meta-analysis of Case–control Studies

    And of course -- all of this aside -- some articles/studies/etc. link spicy food consumption with supposed immune health/disease-resistance, but that seems pretty questionable on what "immune health" even really means when you look deeper in to the subject.
     
  9. methylenewhite

    methylenewhite Member

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    I'm thinking about garam masala potato diet with coconut oil.
     
  10. OP
    ScurveDream

    ScurveDream Member

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    Sounds good. I like potatoes, but the starches may be problematic with a lot of regular consumption normally (same with bananas, pastas, etc.).

    As for spicy foods/spices, I'd say it's probably good to stick with some more than others. I used to supplement with garlic extract and used oregano even for tooth pain and it worked somewhat in the past. Definitely considering oregano oil + more garlic supplementation again. I'll be wary with really hot/spicy foods more though.
     
  11. debored13

    debored13 Member

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    I intuitively think spicy foods are good

    and hot sauce that doenst' have gums in it may have vinegar and salt which are also healthy
     
  12. SuperStressed

    SuperStressed Member

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    adrenaline will do that
     
  13. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    Same here. I was craving spicy hot wings for several months during a time of grave illness related to my lungs/breathing about a year ago.

    I then found research showing how latino Americans in California are protected from respiratory illnesses from their larger intake of spicy foods.

    In Korea, people say that eating spicy foods relieves stress. I've found that to be true as well.

    Strangely enough, I don't crave spicy foods as much anymore. I think it fluctuates and it's probably better not to eat super spicy foods everyday.
     
  14. SOMO

    SOMO Member

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    California is sunnier and warmer than most states and I imagine the Vitamin D levels are higher and Vit D is known to protect against respiratory infections.

    Seems impossible to isolate one variable among Latin Americans in California and determine that it is their intake of spicy - also it's an Occam's Razor situation.
    I suppose it is possible spicy food is protective for that population, but is that the most likely and probable reason for supposedly lower rates of "respiratory illnesses?"
     
  15. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    the study was pretty clear
     
  16. jzeno

    jzeno Member

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  17. SOMO

    SOMO Member

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    So your entire comprehension and understanding of respiratory illness is based off 1 study that states it's "definitely" the spicy foods?


    Capsaicin is an inflammatory chemical that causes inflammation when consumed orally or applied topically to the skin.

    It's very easy to prove, put capsaicin or even chili peppers on your skin and it will burn, become red, itch, sting and possibly cause welts or blisters.

    Consume one too many chili peppers and induce painful intestinal contractions and diarrhea.
     
  18. mrchibbs

    mrchibbs Member

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    You got me. My entire understanding of respiratory illness is based off one study. I don't have the capacity to explore the topic further.
     
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