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Post-Exercise Muscle Glycogen Synthesis

Discussion in 'Exercise' started by Giraffe, Oct 18, 2015.

  1. Giraffe

    Giraffe Member

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    Postexercise muscle glycogen synthesis with combined glucose and fructose ingestion.

    "Glucose and glucose/fructose (2:1 ratio) solutions, ingested at a rate of 90 g x h(-1), are equally effective at restoring muscle glycogen in exercised muscles during the recovery from exhaustive exercise."

    +++++

    A review with links to many studies:

    The Role of Post-Exercise Nutrient Administration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Glycogen Synthesis

    Abstract

    "Nutrient administration following an exercise bout vastly affects anabolic processes within the human body, irrespective of exercise mode. Of particular importance are protein and carbohydrates whereby these two macronutrients portray distinct functions as anabolic agents. It has been confirmed that protein and/or amino acid ingestion following resistance training is required to reach a positive protein/nitrogen balance, and carbohydrate intake during recovery is the most important consideration to replenish glycogen stores from an exhaustive exercise bout. Several factors play significant roles in determining the effectiveness of protein and carbohydrate supplementation on post-exercise protein and glycogen synthesis. Improper application of these factors can limit the body’s ability to reach an anabolic status. The provided evidence clearly denotes the importance these two macronutrients have in regards to post-exercise nutrition and anabolism. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of dietary protein and carbohydrate intake during the recovery state on muscle protein synthesis and glycogen synthesis."
     
  2. NathanK

    NathanK Member

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    Honey has the perfect glucose/fructose ratio. I also drink milk during workouts and have my own AA cocktail afterward. Thanks for posting. Nice to see im on the right track
     
  3. OP
    Giraffe

    Giraffe Member

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    Addition of protein and amino acids to carbohydrates does not enhance postexercise muscle glycogen synthesis.

    Abstract

    "Ingestion of a protein-amino acid mixture (Pro; wheat protein hydrolysate, leucine, and phenylalanine) in combination with carbohydrate (CHO; 0.8 g x kg(-1) x h(-1)) has been shown to increase muscle glycogen synthesis after exercise compared with the same amount of CHO without Pro. The aim of this study was to investigate whether coingestion of Pro also increases muscle glycogen synthesis when 1.2 g CHO. kg(-1). h(-1) is ingested. Eight male cyclists performed two experimental trials separated by 1 wk. After glycogen-depleting exercise, subjects received either CHO (1.2 g x kg(-1) x h(-1)) or CHO+Pro (1.2 g CHO x kg(-1) x h(-1) + 0.4 g Pro x kg(-1) x h(-1)) during a 3-h recovery period. Muscle biopsies were obtained immediately, 1 h, and 3 h after exercise. Blood samples were collected immediately after the exercise bout and every 30 min thereafter. Plasma insulin was significantly higher in the CHO+Pro trial compared with the CHO trial (P < 0.05). No difference was found in plasma glucose or in rate of muscle glycogen synthesis between the CHO and the CHO+Pro trials. Although coingestion of a protein amino acid mixture in combination with a large CHO intake (1.2 g x kg(-1) x h(-1)) increases insulin levels, this does not result in increased muscle glycogen synthesis."
     
  4. jayegray

    jayegray Member

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    What is the best of source peaty approved glucose? Because I have heard him talk about almost all of them negatively is some aspect or another because of the starch involved.
     
  5. superhuman

    superhuman Member

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  6. OP
    Giraffe

    Giraffe Member

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    Effect of different post-exercise sugar diets on the rate of muscle glycogen synthesis.


    "The effect of repeated ingestion of fructose, sucrose, and various amounts of glucose on muscle glycogen synthesis during the first 6 h after exhaustive bicycle exercise was studied."

    Comparing the effect of glucose, sucrose and fructose

    The mean glycogen synthesis after ingestion of glucose, sucrose or fructose (0.70 g/kg bodyweight) at 0, 2 and 4 h after exercise was:

    glucose = 5.8 mmol/(kg*h)
    succrose = 6.2 mmol/(kg*h)
    fructose = 3.2 mmol/(kg*h)


    Comparing different amounts of glucose

    When comparing low, medium and high glucose intake (0.35, 0.7 and 1.4 g/kg bodyweight) the average plasma glucose level did not differ much (5.76, 6.31 and 6.52 mM), while average plasma insulin levels were higher with higher glucose intake (16, 21 and 38). "The rate of post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis increases with increasing oral glucose intake up to a maximum rate of approximately 6 mmol/(kg*h)."

    When the glucose loads were doubled (from 0.35 to 0.7) the rate of glycogen synthesis increased more than twice (2.1 vs. 5.8 mmol/(kg*h)). However when the glucose loads were doubled again (from 0.7 to 1.4) there was no further increase in muscle glycogen synthesis. This may be due to the fact that "plasma glucose was effectively regulated towards the normal resting level, even with a substantial oral glucose intake."

    Discussion/Conclusion


    "The plasma insulin level does not correlate with the rate of post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis." "These results are in accordance with the theory that insulin has a "permissive," but not a direct regulatory effect on post-exercise glucose uptake in muscle cells."

    "In conclusion, the present results indicate that glucose and sucrose are the carbohydrates of choice to restore muscle glycogen deposits after exhaustive exercise. The maximal stimulatory effect of oral glucose intake on post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis was reached at a dose of 0.70 g/kg body weight taken every second hour following exercise in which the muscle glycogen concentration was reduced by an average of 80%."
     
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