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Heat Therapy Restores Mitochondrial Function In Human Muscles

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Jan 3, 2019.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    A really cool study, and I think the reported effects would have been even more impressive if instead of diathermy the scientists used a simple incandescent red bulb to both heat the muscle and expose it to red light. Maybe somebody can email them and suggest this as a follow up study...

    Heat therapy to promote mitochondrial function in muscles - Top Health Journal
    https://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/japplphysiol.00383.2018

    "...Some studies also link exercise to augment the generation of new mitochondria, as well as enhance the function of existing ones. Studies suggest two hours of exercise daily for a healthy mitochondrial count. However, people with chronic diseases are not able to exercise daily and thus cannot reap this benefit. A research at Brigham Young University confirms that heat therapy equally works on humans like that on rodents. The researchers employed 20 individuals for the study. The participants had not exercised for three months. During the study, the participants were given shortwave diathermy to the thigh muscles of one leg. Shortwave diathermy is a therapy that uses heat generated by electrical impulses. This therapy was given for two hours daily and continued for six days. The therapy heated the treated thigh muscles by approximately seven degrees Fahrenheit. This imitated the increase in temperature that exercises cause on the muscles. In order to test the effects of the therapy, the mitochondrial content of the participants’ leg muscles was checked after the first day and 24 hours after the last day of treatment. The researchers found that the therapy increased the mitochondrial function by an average of 28 percent. Moreover, the heated legs exhibited enhanced levels of certain mitochondrial proteins. Thus, the researchers concluded that heat treatments benefit people by improving the number and function of their mitochondria. This therapy works for individuals who cannot engage in long-term exercises."
     
  2. Momado965

    Momado965 Member

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    Funny. I always feel a lot better after a warm shower.
     
  3. michael94

    michael94 Member

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    I was using this just last night with the fire place and a heat lamp
     
  4. michael94

    michael94 Member

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    which country do you live in
    it might also be the chloramines effect on minerals ( both good and bad effects )
     
  5. Velve921

    Velve921 Member

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    Haidut,

    Does the plausibility of this study make it more relatable that ice is not a good way to treat inflammation?

    When I sprained my calf 2 years ago, could barely walk, I only used red Light therapy and Epsom salt to heal the injury and it worked great.
     
  6. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Thanks for this.

    I notice that when I lie down on an infrared heat mat, turned to the max, for a while, my nose starts to get plugged up. Then I would catch myself breathing through the mouth, and I would consciously close my mouth. This makes me rely on the nose for breathing, which is slightly uncomfortable.

    But why it the body doing this? Is it because the body needs more oxygen so it's making me breath through the mouth? Or is it because it needs to retain more CO2 that's why it's blocking my breathing?
     
  7. Makrosky

    Makrosky Member

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    Which red light regime did you use?
    I have a sprained finger that doesn't want to fully heal.
     
  8. Momado965

    Momado965 Member

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    Kuwait. As far as chlorine is concerned, we do use chlorine in our water supply. I am not sure if it is a minute amount or a fair amount. Either way I used three carbon filters. It works great for that purpose but I plan on using another filter. As for as other halides are concenred, I dont know if fluoride is used. I bathe with the water and do not drink it.
     
  9. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think low temps favor adrenaline release and thus fat oxidation. Higher temps, and especially red light, tend to keep stress hormones down, increase glucose oxidation, CO2 levels and thus mitochondrial biogenesis.
     
  10. Luckytype

    Luckytype Member

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    There are enzymatic things that are required for ATP use in contraction and relaxation of a motor unit. Its well known, that adding heat to a reaction, to a given point leads to an increase in the rate of reaction pending enought substrate and catalyst.

    Adding ice as a modality is much along the lines of an analgesic as the data doesnt show too much about the antiinflammatory response. That said, inflammation in a joint or muscular injury at least the first day is needed for remodeling and removal of waste and damaged tissue, dont blunt this.

    As far as adding heat this makes total sense, SWD allows for penetration versus radiation from outside inward. Avoiding local ischemia from cold induced vasoconstriction allows for actual temperature maintainance and thus better actual enzymatic activity and mito function. This is the "reason" for warming up, figuratively and literally. Getting up to operating temp for performance.
     
  11. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    In first minutes of injury applying ice helps to prevent bruises(maybe also inflammation as it lessens the pain) , but later warmer is better i believe.
     
  12. paymanz

    paymanz Member

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    If you keep increase the temp at some point some chemical reactions in muscle cant take place anymore. so too hot is not good at least if you want physical performance.
     
  13. Velve921

    Velve921 Member

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    Used the basic 250W bulb and fixture from Amazon.
     
  14. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Thanks. I should try to breath with my mouth when my nose feels plugged up then. Just to find out my bodily response in terms of heart rate and blood pressure.
     
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