haidut

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A really cool study, and I think the reported effects would have been even more impressive if instead of diathermy the scientists used a simple incandescent red bulb to both heat the muscle and expose it to red light. Maybe somebody can email them and suggest this as a follow up study...

Heat therapy to promote mitochondrial function in muscles - Top Health Journal
https://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/japplphysiol.00383.2018

"...Some studies also link exercise to augment the generation of new mitochondria, as well as enhance the function of existing ones. Studies suggest two hours of exercise daily for a healthy mitochondrial count. However, people with chronic diseases are not able to exercise daily and thus cannot reap this benefit. A research at Brigham Young University confirms that heat therapy equally works on humans like that on rodents. The researchers employed 20 individuals for the study. The participants had not exercised for three months. During the study, the participants were given shortwave diathermy to the thigh muscles of one leg. Shortwave diathermy is a therapy that uses heat generated by electrical impulses. This therapy was given for two hours daily and continued for six days. The therapy heated the treated thigh muscles by approximately seven degrees Fahrenheit. This imitated the increase in temperature that exercises cause on the muscles. In order to test the effects of the therapy, the mitochondrial content of the participants’ leg muscles was checked after the first day and 24 hours after the last day of treatment. The researchers found that the therapy increased the mitochondrial function by an average of 28 percent. Moreover, the heated legs exhibited enhanced levels of certain mitochondrial proteins. Thus, the researchers concluded that heat treatments benefit people by improving the number and function of their mitochondria. This therapy works for individuals who cannot engage in long-term exercises."
 

michael94

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I was using this just last night with the fire place and a heat lamp
 

Velve921

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Haidut,

Does the plausibility of this study make it more relatable that ice is not a good way to treat inflammation?

When I sprained my calf 2 years ago, could barely walk, I only used red Light therapy and Epsom salt to heal the injury and it worked great.
 

yerrag

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A really cool study, and I think the reported effects would have been even more impressive if instead of diathermy the scientists used a simple incandescent red bulb to both heat the muscle and expose it to red light. Maybe somebody can email them and suggest this as a follow up study...

Heat therapy to promote mitochondrial function in muscles - Top Health Journal
https://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/japplphysiol.00383.2018

"...Some studies also link exercise to augment the generation of new mitochondria, as well as enhance the function of existing ones. Studies suggest two hours of exercise daily for a healthy mitochondrial count. However, people with chronic diseases are not able to exercise daily and thus cannot reap this benefit. A research at Brigham Young University confirms that heat therapy equally works on humans like that on rodents. The researchers employed 20 individuals for the study. The participants had not exercised for three months. During the study, the participants were given shortwave diathermy to the thigh muscles of one leg. Shortwave diathermy is a therapy that uses heat generated by electrical impulses. This therapy was given for two hours daily and continued for six days. The therapy heated the treated thigh muscles by approximately seven degrees Fahrenheit. This imitated the increase in temperature that exercises cause on the muscles. In order to test the effects of the therapy, the mitochondrial content of the participants’ leg muscles was checked after the first day and 24 hours after the last day of treatment. The researchers found that the therapy increased the mitochondrial function by an average of 28 percent. Moreover, the heated legs exhibited enhanced levels of certain mitochondrial proteins. Thus, the researchers concluded that heat treatments benefit people by improving the number and function of their mitochondria. This therapy works for individuals who cannot engage in long-term exercises."

Thanks for this.

I notice that when I lie down on an infrared heat mat, turned to the max, for a while, my nose starts to get plugged up. Then I would catch myself breathing through the mouth, and I would consciously close my mouth. This makes me rely on the nose for breathing, which is slightly uncomfortable.

But why it the body doing this? Is it because the body needs more oxygen so it's making me breath through the mouth? Or is it because it needs to retain more CO2 that's why it's blocking my breathing?
 

Makrosky

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Haidut,

Does the plausibility of this study make it more relatable that ice is not a good way to treat inflammation?

When I sprained my calf 2 years ago, could barely walk, I only used red Light therapy and Epsom salt to heal the injury and it worked great.
Which red light regime did you use?
I have a sprained finger that doesn't want to fully heal.
 

Momado965

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which country do you live in
it might also be the chloramines effect on minerals ( both good and bad effects )

Kuwait. As far as chlorine is concerned, we do use chlorine in our water supply. I am not sure if it is a minute amount or a fair amount. Either way I used three carbon filters. It works great for that purpose but I plan on using another filter. As for as other halides are concenred, I dont know if fluoride is used. I bathe with the water and do not drink it.
 

haidut

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Thanks for this.

I notice that when I lie down on an infrared heat mat, turned to the max, for a while, my nose starts to get plugged up. Then I would catch myself breathing through the mouth, and I would consciously close my mouth. This makes me rely on the nose for breathing, which is slightly uncomfortable.

But why it the body doing this? Is it because the body needs more oxygen so it's making me breath through the mouth? Or is it because it needs to retain more CO2 that's why it's blocking my breathing?

I think low temps favor adrenaline release and thus fat oxidation. Higher temps, and especially red light, tend to keep stress hormones down, increase glucose oxidation, CO2 levels and thus mitochondrial biogenesis.
 

Luckytype

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There are enzymatic things that are required for ATP use in contraction and relaxation of a motor unit. Its well known, that adding heat to a reaction, to a given point leads to an increase in the rate of reaction pending enought substrate and catalyst.

Haidut,

Does the plausibility of this study make it more relatable that ice is not a good way to treat inflammation?

When I sprained my calf 2 years ago, could barely walk, I only used red Light therapy and Epsom salt to heal the injury and it worked great.

Adding ice as a modality is much along the lines of an analgesic as the data doesnt show too much about the antiinflammatory response. That said, inflammation in a joint or muscular injury at least the first day is needed for remodeling and removal of waste and damaged tissue, dont blunt this.

As far as adding heat this makes total sense, SWD allows for penetration versus radiation from outside inward. Avoiding local ischemia from cold induced vasoconstriction allows for actual temperature maintainance and thus better actual enzymatic activity and mito function. This is the "reason" for warming up, figuratively and literally. Getting up to operating temp for performance.
 

paymanz

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In first minutes of injury applying ice helps to prevent bruises(maybe also inflammation as it lessens the pain) , but later warmer is better i believe.
 

paymanz

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If you keep increase the temp at some point some chemical reactions in muscle cant take place anymore. so too hot is not good at least if you want physical performance.
 

yerrag

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I think low temps favor adrenaline release and thus fat oxidation. Higher temps, and especially red light, tend to keep stress hormones down, increase glucose oxidation, CO2 levels and thus mitochondrial biogenesis.
Thanks. I should try to breath with my mouth when my nose feels plugged up then. Just to find out my bodily response in terms of heart rate and blood pressure.
 

Cirion

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Just to play devil's advocate... what about Jack Kruse's infamous ice therapy supposedly being the end all be all for pain management? Maybe that's all it is, pain management, and not actual healing.
 

Luckytype

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Just to play devil's advocate... what about Jack Kruse's infamous ice therapy supposedly being the end all be all for pain management? Maybe that's all it is, pain management, and not actual healing.
Whats the argument against metabolism?
 

rei

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I think same as after brain injury etc. where cooling the head can be dramatically beneficial. It slows down processes and prevents excitotoxic cell damage.

Then once the situation has stabilized and body has had time to react THEN use infrared heat to help in healing.
 
J

jb116

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Just to play devil's advocate... what about Jack Kruse's infamous ice therapy supposedly being the end all be all for pain management? Maybe that's all it is, pain management, and not actual healing.
adrenanline and cortisol are helluva drug lol
 

Cirion

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adrenanline and cortisol are helluva drug lol

not to mention he is anti-carb which further increases cortisol. In his book he says he goes 0% carb in winter and 30% carb in summer which is still pretty low. he is also a fan of blunting appetite to lose weight. While effective at losing weight, is not effective at gaining health.

I gave his philosophies a fair chance (I read a good amount of his book) but I think the part that made me finally discount him is the part where he basically says your body temperature is going to drop a lot doing cold therapy (I could have told you that LOL), and that it takes years of applying his theories for your body temp to reach "normal" (98.6F) temperatures.

Ummm, yeah. That's when I stopped reading basically. JK is going to cause a lot of people to have suppressed metabolisms...

Also I get the feeling JK has rather high serotonin, given how negatively he responds to people giving him very well thought out critiques, showing that he knows deep down he is wrong but is not willing to admit it.
 
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