Burning fat, maintaining glucose supply...

Discussion in 'Weight' started by Primal2Peat, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. Primal2Peat

    Primal2Peat Member

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    Isn't it possible to burn fat and maintain glucose levels so that the body isn't releasing free fatty acids into the blood causing damage?

    I get the idea from people here that you need to maintain your weight and body fat percentage until you convert your body fat from poly-unsaturated to saturated.

    I guess I'm asking if I can burn fat if I maintain a constant flow of sugar.

    I'm not quite clear on how the body or liver uses stored fat.

    Maybe I'm being a little impatient, because I want to lower the body fat percentage thinking that the turnover to a more saturated supply will occur more quickly.

    On a side note, the more fat I burn, the better my skin looks. Why would that be?
     
  2. gretchen

    gretchen Member

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    Don't eat between meals.
     
  3. OP
    Primal2Peat

    Primal2Peat Member

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    Could you expand on that?

    I don't see what that has to do with anything I said.
     
  4. cliff

    cliff Member

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    eating smaller more frequent meals and minimizing fat intake to decrease cals will help burn more fat while avoiding the stressful effects of calorie restricting. Weight lifting to increase lean mass will help you to burn more fat.
     
  5. KT-John

    KT-John Member

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    I'll have to second Cliff's recommendation. High sugar and protein combined with a low fat intake has had a pretty profound effect on my body comp.
     
  6. OP
    Primal2Peat

    Primal2Peat Member

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    That's what I'm doing right now, and it's awesome.

    I just get the idea from some people on here that burning fat fast is bad, and that it should take a long time to replace stored PUFA with saturated fat.

    Where as I feel you can do it quickly by lifting weights and keeping a constant flow of sugar/protein.
     
  7. cliff

    cliff Member

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    burning a lot of fat on a starvation diet is bad
     
  8. j.

    j. Guest

    is PUFA release the worst thing about it? also, if you happen to know, does PUFA release to the bloodstream produce long term damage?
     
  9. cliff

    cliff Member

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    the stress hormones+pufa release(which amplifies the stress hormones) is the main concern. I think the damage is reversible caused by excessive pufa release for the most part.
     
  10. gretchen

    gretchen Member

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    Not eating between meals allows insulin to drop so you can burn fat. At least some anyway... I can go 3 hours between meals at least if I eat the right ratios/amounts of protein & carbs.
     
  11. j.

    j. Guest

    RP thinks eating frequently also has benefits, but I don't know how these relate to weight loss.

    Milk in context: allergies, ecology, and some myths
     
  12. cliff

    cliff Member

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    You can burn fat when insulin is high. Waiting too long to eat increases stress hormones.
     
  13. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    There was a statement made somewhere, that we are always burning fat to some degree or another. Especially when we sleep. That true?
     
  14. cliff

    cliff Member

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    Yes, higher muscle mass allows more to be burned without ffa becoming high in the blood.
     
  15. KT-John

    KT-John Member

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    That's always been my thinking too. In fact, I got the idea from an old Burr's study from the 1930s, where they were trying to prove the "essentiallity" (not a word, I know) of the essential fatty acids. One of the members of the research team volunteered to go on a fat-free diet for 6 months. His food intake consisted of a gallon of skim milk, biscuit made out of potato starch, juice from half an orange with the remainder of the calories coming from sucrose (sounds kinda of like a Peat diet actually).

    During the 6 month experiment many great things happened:

    1) He lost weight despite being on a calorie/weight-maintenance diet (although he was already lean to begin with so this may or may not be good depending on one's interpretation).

    2) Increased his resting metabolic rate from below normal to near normal (indicative of improved thyroid function?).

    3) Improved his blood pressure (which was high in the beginning).

    4) Completely eliminated his migraines (which had previously plagued him for years as I recall).

    5) Improved energy levels (going on memory, I think it said something like "no longer experienced the normal fatigue at the end of the work day").

    6) And last but not least, significantly decreased the PUFA content in his (fat?) tissues.

    Of course, the Burrs considered the decrease in PUFAs as a negative and proof that humans need to consume the EFAs.

    I believe Ray Peat even discussed the above experiment in one of the more recent articles on sugar. However, he did not comment on the fat-free part of the study and the effect it had on tissue PUFA levels. So perhaps Peat does not consider it good to decrease PUFA levels at such a fast rate (as opposed to a slower method via glucoronidation(sp)) as recently discussed in another post. I don't know.

    Who knows. Personally, I'd rather do something fast (even if it caused problems in the short term) than slow. I guess it depends on how you look at it.
     
  16. superhuman

    superhuman Member

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    This is an awesome topic.

    The only thing i find hard is i have a BIG appetite so when i eat i EAT maybe its also because im used to intermittent fasting and stuff but still. I like to just eat when hungry wich is usually after 12+ hours and i also feel its a little hassle to eat all the time. Kind of frustrating.

    In terms of fat/weight loss it has been proven that calories are the most important factor not the meal frequency ? ofc frequency can have some effects on hormone stuff that got mentioned here but i have never seen any benefits from the studies in terms of more meals vs less meals its actually quite the opposite. People tend to loose more fat and get better results with eating fewer meals.
     
  17. aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    "proven" eh??!

    by whom? When?

    Frankly your statement above is nonsense (at least in my humble opinion!).
     
  18. superhuman

    superhuman Member

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  19. juanitacarlos

    juanitacarlos Member

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    The problem with these shitty experiments is that they are all short-term. Good luck maintaining your health and fat loss eating like that for years on end.
     
  20. aquaman

    aquaman Member

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