Blocking Adrenaline Activity May Reduce Autism Symptoms

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Feb 12, 2016.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    As discussed many times on the forum, autism is likely a condition triggered by maternal stress during pregnancy so in theory it can be prevented. However, once established in the child there are no official therapies approved for it. I posted some studies on blocking serotonin curing autism in animal models. This human study shows that blocking adrenaline signalling can also improve symptoms. So, I guess the stress reaction from pregnancy continues in the child and opposing the stress mechanism can be beneficial.
    The interesting thing is that the positive effects of blocking the stress signalling by using beta-blockers were known even back in 1987 but there was not much interest in replicating the results. I guess the fact that propranolol is generic and dirt cheap contributes to this lack of interest.

    Blood pressure medicine may improve conversational skills of individuals with autism

    "...Led by Rachel Zamzow, graduate student with the MU Center for Translational Neuroscience, 20 individuals with autism were recruited from the MU Thompson Center and given either a 40-milligram dose of propranolol or a placebo pill. An hour after administration, the researchers had a structured conversation with the participants, scoring their performance on six social skills necessary to maintain a conversation: staying on topic, sharing information, reciprocity or shared conversation, transitions or interruptions, nonverbal communication and maintaining eye contact. The researchers found the total communication scores were significantly greater when the individual took propranolol compared to the placebo."
     
  2. m_arch

    m_arch Member

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    Hi haidut, my gf finds it hard to function with out betablockers. Her rhr is around 100 and on betablockers, it's around 70. do you think long term betablocker use is healthy? Are there more 'natural' alternatives to oppose the adrenalin?
     
  3. m_arch

    m_arch Member

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    My understanding is also that beta-blockers stop adrenaline at the receptor - from being 'accepted', however it doesn't stop people from creating the adrenalin, so the adrenalin is still floating around in the body (and hence why people who come off beta-blockers get heart attacks)
    Please correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  4. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    I think clonidine is a safer and more beneficial drug. Also, I think it lowers the production of adrenaline and not just blocking its "receptor".
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Correct. That is why a drug like clonidine is usually better as it lowers the actual production of adrenaline, so it has a much more systemic effect.
     
  6. m_arch

    m_arch Member

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    Thanks haidut! We'll try clonidine out and report back.
     
  7. blob69

    blob69 Member

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    @m_arch May I suggest pregnenolone as well? It can work incredibly well for adrenaline/anxiety. If I'm stressed, it lowers my resting heart rate for about 10-15 points if I take high amounts (up to a gram). I suppose it's fixing some hormonal imbalance as opposed to beta blockers that just suppress symptoms.
     
  8. blob69

    blob69 Member

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    Oh and clonidine strangely doesn't do much for me...
     
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