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10 Songs That Will Get You High(Dopaminergic), According To Science

paymanz

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10 Songs That Will Get You High, According to Science



Anatomically distinct dopamine release during anticipation and experience of peak emotion to music

Music
, an abstract stimulus, can arouse feelings of euphoria and craving, similar to tangible rewards that involve the striatal dopaminergic system. Using the neurochemical specificity of [11C]raclopride positron emission tomography scanning, combined with psychophysiological measures of autonomic nervous system activity, we found endogenous dopamine release in the striatum at peak emotional arousal during music listening. To examine the time course of dopamine release, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging with the same stimuli and listeners, and found a functional dissociation: the caudate was more involved during the anticipation and the nucleus accumbens was more involved during the experience of peak emotional responses to music. These results indicate that intense pleasure in response to music can lead to dopamine release in the striatal system. Notably, the anticipation of an abstract reward can result in dopamine release in an anatomical pathway distinct from that associated with the peak pleasure itself. Our results help to explain why music is of such high value across all human societies.
 
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paymanz

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Music improves dopaminergic neurotransmission: demonstration based on the effect of music on blood pressure regulation. - PubMed - NCBI
Abstract
The mechanism by which music modifies brain function is not clear. Clinical findings indicate that music reduces blood pressure in various patients. We investigated the effect of music on blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Previous studies indicated that calcium increases brain dopamine (DA) synthesis through a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent system. Increased DA levels reduce blood pressure in SHR. In this study, we examined the effects of music on this pathway. Systolic blood pressure in SHR was reduced by exposure to Mozart's music (K.205), and the effect vanished when this pathway was inhibited. Exposure to music also significantly increased serum calcium levels and neostriatal DA levels. These results suggest that music leads to increased calcium/CaM-dependent DA synthesis in the brain, thus causing a reduction in blood pressure. Music might regulate and/or affect various brain functions through dopaminergic neurotransmission, and might therefore be effective for rectification of symptoms in various diseases that involve DA dysfunction.
 

whodathunkit

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Interesting. I always figured it was the massive quantities of dope we were smoking that got me high when we put on LZII. Turns out it was just "Moby D ick"! :D
 

Drareg

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Some have said that churches many moons ago had organs that resonated so loudly that the body vibrated with them, music was for resonating with you creating a coherency with the potential to heal,probably influenced the electric current.

Ode to Joy by Beethoven is the higher forms in play, modern music struggles to get near the vibes this evokes.
He was deaf at this point.

 

Drareg

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A fugue is also potent, put head phones on and listen to this. It runs through you.
 
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marikay

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While at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City a few years ago, I experienced this vibrating. It was during the fourth opera in Wagner's "The Ring Cycle" (aka Götterdammerung) and a chorus of fifty men were singing to welcome Brünnhilde (the heroine) back home. At the height of the chorus, even my toenails were vibrating. There are no microphones there (of course) and no other amplification of the voices. Just pure live music and singing. (Highest paid orchestra in the world and probably highest paid opera singers as well so maybe it shouldn't have surprised me, but it did.) I had heard of this sort of thing but never experienced it till then. That was really something.

And the opera was nearly six hours long….
 

Pointless

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Listening to types to music you've never heard before can be very stimulating and rewarding, too. Modern music is very helpful here.

Novelty seeking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I think modern composers had listened to so much Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms, that they stopped responding to it in the same way, so they started creating stuff like this:



And it just got crazier from there.
 
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Makrosky

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Hahahah marvelous @Hugh Johnson that ******* Zizek ... he's funny and smart. And crazy.

But anyway... he's always rationalizing too much, overanalyzing things and talking about "ideologies" ... poor sod ... I think no matter what, humans can recognise beautiness and let themselves elevated from day to day politics, misery, narrowness of ego, etc. by music like Beethovens one.

 
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