Vitamin K reduces vascular stiffness, blood pressure in humans

haidut

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The topic of vitamin K and blood pressure has been coming up for years among followers of Peat. He mentioned several cases, of which he had first-hand knowledge, where people managed to significantly and rapidly reduce their blood pressure by taking large doses of vitamin K. A number of naysayers kept bashing Ray and his claims about vitamin K, saying there is no evidence whatsoever that vitamin K reduces blood pressure, and that in fact there is no known mechanism through which vitamin K can effect blood pressure. Well, as a start, here is a decade-old case study reporting that not only can vitamin K lower blood pressure it can do so to the point of hypotension (depending on the dose).

Hypotension associated with menaquinone - PubMed

And now, the controlled, randomized human study below demonstrated that vitamin K can indeed lower blood pressure consistently and the likely mechanism is the reversal of vascular stiffness, which the supplementation with vitamin K also achieved. Vascular stiffness is a symptom of vascular calcification, and vitamin K has been shown in numerous animal studies (and now human ones) to be able to prevent/reverse said calcification. So, considering vitamin K not only effectively lowers blood pressure but actually treats the underlying cause, it probably won't be long before vitamin K becomes a regulated drug in the West, mimicking its prescription-only status in many Asian countries. That would be the only way to prevent/limit the damage vitamin K can do to the multi-billion dollar CVD drug industry.

Beneficial effects of one-year menaquinone-7 supplementation on vascular stiffness and blood pressure in post-menopausal women
Study results demonstrating vascular benefits of MK-7 in menopausal women presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress

"...In post-hoc analyses, results showed that both pre/peri-menopausal and post-menopausal subjects taking MK-7 saw a significant decrease in dp-ucMGP plasma levels. In post-menopausal women, supplementation with MK-7 significantly attenuated vascular stiffness in post-menopausal women, and those with a high stiffness index saw significant improvements in vascular markers such as decreased blood pressure at brachialis, decreased blood pressure at carotid artery, increased distensibility coefficient and increased compliance coefficient. The study concluded that hormonal changes do in fact negatively impact the vasculature of post-menopausal women, and that MK-7 may attenuate these changes. However, more research is necessary to determine the mechanism by which MK-7 exerts these benefits. “This abstract strengthens the proof that K2 as MenaQ7 supports healthy cardiovascular function in aging women and can serve as an inexpensive tool for protecting heart health,” said Professor Leon Schurgers, lead researcher on the post-hoc analysis and chair of the Gnosis Vitamin K2 Scientific Advisory Committee, in a press release."
 
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The topic of vitamin K and blood pressure has been coming up for years among followers of Peat. He mentioned several cases, of which he had first-hand knowledge, where people managed to significantly and rapidly reduce their blood pressure by taking large doses of vitamin K. A number of naysayers kept bashing Ray and his claims about vitamin K, saying there is no evidence whatsoever that vitamin K reduces blood pressure, and that in fact there is no known mechanism through which vitamin K can effect blood pressure. Well, as a start, here is a decade-old case study reporting that not only can vitamin K lower blood pressure it can do so to the point of hypotension (depending on the dose).

Hypotension associated with menaquinone - PubMed

And now, the controlled, randomized human study below demonstrated that vitamin K can indeed lower blood pressure consistently and the likely mechanism is the reversal of vascular stiffness, which the supplementation with vitamin K also achieved. Vascular stiffness is a symptom of vascular calcification, and vitamin K has been shown in numerous animal studies (and now human ones) to be able to prevent/reverse said calcification. So, considering vitamin K not only effectively lowers blood pressure but actually treats the underlying cause, it probably won't be long before vitamin K becomes a regulated drug in the West, mimicking its prescription-only status in many Asian countries. That would be the only way to prevent/limit the damage vitamin K can do to the multi-billion dollar CVD drug industry.

Beneficial effects of one-year menaquinone-7 supplementation on vascular stiffness and blood pressure in post-menopausal women
Study results demonstrating vascular benefits of MK-7 in menopausal women presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress

"...In post-hoc analyses, results showed that both pre/peri-menopausal and post-menopausal subjects taking MK-7 saw a significant decrease in dp-ucMGP plasma levels. In post-menopausal women, supplementation with MK-7 significantly attenuated vascular stiffness in post-menopausal women, and those with a high stiffness index saw significant improvements in vascular markers such as decreased blood pressure at brachialis, decreased blood pressure at carotid artery, increased distensibility coefficient and increased compliance coefficient. The study concluded that hormonal changes do in fact negatively impact the vasculature of post-menopausal women, and that MK-7 may attenuate these changes. However, more research is necessary to determine the mechanism by which MK-7 exerts these benefits. “This abstract strengthens the proof that K2 as MenaQ7 supports healthy cardiovascular function in aging women and can serve as an inexpensive tool for protecting heart health,” said Professor Leon Schurgers, lead researcher on the post-hoc analysis and chair of the Gnosis Vitamin K2 Scientific Advisory Committee, in a press release."
I don’t understand why K1 would not lower blood pressure, since it is a blood thinner. It seems to me vitamin E would be just as helpful.
 

FrostedShores

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Huh. I was under the impression the MK-4 form of vitamin K2 was the preferred form, but these studies used MK-7 with good results. Does it matter? Would a mix of the two be best?
 

Vandivier

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From what I have gathered reading through the forum, MK4 is preferred to decrease bleeding associated with high doses of aspirin. The MK7 form is good for keeping veins healthy and plaque free.
 

dukesbobby777

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I think I might give this a shot. Drop all supplements (not that I take many), and just do high dose K2 every day, with some vitamin E (once per week).

It would be great to drop the ramipril altogether (although it works a treat in getting my blood pressure down to perfect values).

So what causes this calcification? Why do I, a person who has eaten a Peat inspired diet (to the best of my ability), end up with elevated blood pressure? Why would I need extremely high dosages of K2 to reverse this problem, and other people my age (who just eat a normal Western diet and dont even try to improve their health), have perfectly fine blood pressure?


I always thought that there are potentially many causes of elevated blood pressure. Mine has definitely been a mystery. I ended up taking the ramipril because I don't want to end up having a stroke or something.
 

geusterman

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The one year study on post-menopausal women noted in Haidut's report above dosed the test group " received daily 180 µg of MK-7 (n=83) or a matching placebo (n=83) for one year." I see Bulk Supplements recommend 90 mcg daily so that would be doubled to match the study. Based on no apparent side affects I am going to likely do 360mcg just to produce as much effect quickly as I can. My calcium score on my heart vessels is zero so not sure why my BP is high. Kidneys ok. I'll let you all know!
 

LA

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@haidut
Thank you for your good posting!

We were using the original Thorne K2 as Menatetetrenone (aka menaquinone-4) produced by a company in Idaho. After it became very popular they sold their company to a business in NY that manufactures the product in South Carolina or someplace in the south. Thorne is *no longer* the same product and it doesnot work for us.
In addition, the squeeze dropper was more practical for our needs. The new owners use a "metered dispenser" and the squeeze dropper was quicker and could be use to drop liquid on injuries etc.
- -- regardless of the application dropper" the ingredients are not the same since the "new Improved" product is not as effective

We researched and sampled different brands. First I found a hard-tablet mk4 I could chew or swallow with water. It worked well enough for me although my husband did not like it so we settled on another capsule form of K2-MK4

Now we also, sometimes, use a liquid K2-MK7 since it 'seems' to remain active longer in the body

also I had terrific improvement after reading the following thread and we added more pork to our diet. My nosebleeds totally stopped simply from adding Pork to my diet:

 

Badger

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The topic of vitamin K and blood pressure has been coming up for years among followers of Peat. He mentioned several cases, of which he had first-hand knowledge, where people managed to significantly and rapidly reduce their blood pressure by taking large doses of vitamin K. A number of naysayers kept bashing Ray and his claims about vitamin K, saying there is no evidence whatsoever that vitamin K reduces blood pressure, and that in fact there is no known mechanism through which vitamin K can effect blood pressure. Well, as a start, here is a decade-old case study reporting that not only can vitamin K lower blood pressure it can do so to the point of hypotension (depending on the dose).

Hypotension associated with menaquinone - PubMed

And now, the controlled, randomized human study below demonstrated that vitamin K can indeed lower blood pressure consistently and the likely mechanism is the reversal of vascular stiffness, which the supplementation with vitamin K also achieved. Vascular stiffness is a symptom of vascular calcification, and vitamin K has been shown in numerous animal studies (and now human ones) to be able to prevent/reverse said calcification. So, considering vitamin K not only effectively lowers blood pressure but actually treats the underlying cause, it probably won't be long before vitamin K becomes a regulated drug in the West, mimicking its prescription-only status in many Asian countries. That would be the only way to prevent/limit the damage vitamin K can do to the multi-billion dollar CVD drug industry.

Beneficial effects of one-year menaquinone-7 supplementation on vascular stiffness and blood pressure in post-menopausal women
Study results demonstrating vascular benefits of MK-7 in menopausal women presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress

"...In post-hoc analyses, results showed that both pre/peri-menopausal and post-menopausal subjects taking MK-7 saw a significant decrease in dp-ucMGP plasma levels. In post-menopausal women, supplementation with MK-7 significantly attenuated vascular stiffness in post-menopausal women, and those with a high stiffness index saw significant improvements in vascular markers such as decreased blood pressure at brachialis, decreased blood pressure at carotid artery, increased distensibility coefficient and increased compliance coefficient. The study concluded that hormonal changes do in fact negatively impact the vasculature of post-menopausal women, and that MK-7 may attenuate these changes. However, more research is necessary to determine the mechanism by which MK-7 exerts these benefits. “This abstract strengthens the proof that K2 as MenaQ7 supports healthy cardiovascular function in aging women and can serve as an inexpensive tool for protecting heart health,” said Professor Leon Schurgers, lead researcher on the post-hoc analysis and chair of the Gnosis Vitamin K2 Scientific Advisory Committee, in a press release."
If I were giving my rat, who has high blood pressure, vitamin K in the form of Kuinone, based on the study you cite, how much would I give it?
 

ddjd

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What do people think about k factors (vitamin k) in wholefood vitamin c complex??

Would that also have the same effect??
whole-food-supplement.jpg
 

dukesbobby777

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The one year study on post-menopausal women noted in Haidut's report above dosed the test group " received daily 180 µg of MK-7 (n=83) or a matching placebo (n=83) for one year." I see Bulk Supplements recommend 90 mcg daily so that would be doubled to match the study. Based on no apparent side affects I am going to likely do 360mcg just to produce as much effect quickly as I can. My calcium score on my heart vessels is zero so not sure why my BP is high. Kidneys ok. I'll let you all know!

Is that the powder? How do you measure 360mcg out? That's barely a crumb?
 

dukesbobby777

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I haven’t received it yet but I noted on the ingredients that 9 mg of the powder produces 90 µg of MK-7

Ah, OK. That means the remainder is this dicalcium phosphate that they've put in there as bulker/filler. Because 90mcg is basically a spec of dust lol

I'm going to get some to replicate the study, and i will take it for a year. Firstly though, I'm currently taking 20 drops of kuinone per day to kick things off (no other supplements apart from calcium carbonate when needed, some magnesium, and vitamin D3).
 

cremes

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Ah, OK. That means the remainder is this dicalcium phosphate that they've put in there as bulker/filler. Because 90mcg is basically a spec of dust lol

I'm going to get some to replicate the study, and i will take it for a year. Firstly though, I'm currently taking 20 drops of kuinone per day to kick things off (no other supplements apart from calcium carbonate when needed, some magnesium, and vitamin D3).
Are you taking the kuinone topically or orally?
 

Hugh Johnson

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The one year study on post-menopausal women noted in Haidut's report above dosed the test group " received daily 180 µg of MK-7 (n=83) or a matching placebo (n=83) for one year." I see Bulk Supplements recommend 90 mcg daily so that would be doubled to match the study. Based on no apparent side affects I am going to likely do 360mcg just to produce as much effect quickly as I can. My calcium score on my heart vessels is zero so not sure why my BP is high. Kidneys ok. I'll let you all know!
Just get yourself 15 mg pills and take those. It's perfectly safe, and generally beneficial.
 

Whiteheart

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I know a man who has kidney stones about every 10 years. Being as they are made primarily of calcium, I assume supplementing some vit. K would help prevent their formation?
 
P

Peatress

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Vitamin K does lower blood pressure but that’s not the case for everyone. I’ve tried K1, K2 (MK4 and MK7), high dose, low dose. My high blood pressure was unchanged, in fact, there were times when my bp would spike after taking vitamin k. I’ve tried many brands, Relentless improvement, Kuinone, Thorne, Fairvital, and others. With vitamin D, magnesium, and without. The cost has been considerable over the last 6 years and still I rise!
 
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sweetpeat

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Vitamin K does lower blood pressure but that’s not the case for everyone. I’ve tried K1, K2 (MK4 and MK7), high dose, low dose. My high blood pressure was unchanged, in fact, there were times when my bp would spike after taking vitamin k. I’ve tried many brands, Relentless improvement, Kuinone, Thorne, Fairvital, and others. With vitamin D, magnesium, and without. The cost has been considerable over the last 6 years and still I rise!
Have you tried policosanols or olive leaf extract? These are a couple of ideas I have listed in my notes.
 
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