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Virtually All Patients With Depression Are Hypothyroid

haidut

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It does not get much better than what this study found. More than 2/3 of mildly depressed patients and basically all moderately and severely depressed ones has low T3 levels. TSH was elevated in almost 55% of the patients. As the study says, this widespread prevalence of sub-clinical hypothyroidism may explain why so few people respond to antidepressants and why they relapse so often. However, because their hypothyroidism would be considered sub-clinical, as the study said, very few of those people will likely get treatment from their doctor. So, until doctors finally start to see depression as an endocrine problem instead of a mood disorder, an actual cure for depression will likely remain elusive.

A STUDY OF THYROID HORMONES (T3, T4 & TSH) IN PATIENTS OF DEPRESSION
"...In this study, 32 unmedicated patients of unipolar depression were included and blood samples were analysed for T3, T4 and TSH. These were compared with age and sex matched controls. Subnormal T3 and T4 levels in 90.6% and 9.3% respectively and an increase of TSH levels in 18.7% of the total patients was observed in this study. The patients were classified into mild, moderate and severe grade of depression as per DSM-IV criteria. Of the mild 66.6%, 93.3% of moderate and all of the severe grade depression patients had low T3 levels. Of the moderately depressed patients 13.3% and 9.0% of severe depression patients had low T4 levels. TSH was increased than normal in 54.5% of the patients and all these patients were of severe grade. ANOVA with multiple comparison testing shows significant decrease in levels of T3 (F2.29 >3.33) and significant increase in TSH levels (F2.29 >3.33) at 5% level of significance amongst mild, moderate and severe grade of depression patients. This study suggests a subclinical hypothyroidism in most of the patients which could lead to nonresponsiveness to the conventional antidepressant therapy. Therefore, evaluation of thyroid status prior to antidepressant therapy and subsequent thyroid hormone substitution in subclinical hypothyroid patients is suggested."
 

Arnold Grape

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It seems like a lot of people here suffer from mood issues. Given a study like this, what is the most logical way of approaching a mood disorder if one has low T3 and doctors are unable to get to the root of the problem? If a patient is able to make specific deductions about their mental state, what would one theoretically do to treat this disorder?
 

Vinero

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It seems like a lot of people here suffer from mood issues. Given a study like this, what is the most logical way of approaching a mood disorder if one has low T3 and doctors are unable to get to the root of the problem? If a patient is able to make specific deductions about their mental state, what would one theoretically do to treat this disorder?
Low dose DHEA (5 mg) seems to be very similar to thyroid in increasing temperature and mood. Vitamin E has similar effects. There are many things you can try to overcome hypothyroid symptoms. Ofcourse you have to fix your diet and eat enough protein, carbs, and avoid irritating foods.
 

vulture

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Low dose DHEA (5 mg) seems to be very similar to thyroid in increasing temperature and mood. Vitamin E has similar effects. There are many things you can try to overcome hypothyroid symptoms. Ofcourse you have to fix your diet and eat enough protein, carbs, and avoid irritating foods.
Has anyone you know reversed hypothyroidism without using thyroid hormones? And I'm talking also about stopping DHEA or anything else beside good food and lifestyle and having a good thyroid function
 

haidut

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Has anyone you know reversed hypothyroidism without using thyroid hormones? And I'm talking also about stopping DHEA or anything else beside good food and lifestyle and having a good thyroid function

I know of hypothyroid people who do quite well on a progesterone/DHEA combo (CortiNon) without taking any thyroid and their TSH still stays below 1. Don't know how long they can last without anything though. Some people are very hypo and if their thyroid is damaged they probably need to take something chronically.
 

Arnold Grape

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I do the aforementioned Progesterone/ DHEA combination (morning) in conjunction with Pregnenolone/ DHEA (two drops, most nights), and I can report that ameliorates virtually all mood problems.
 

vulture

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I do the aforementioned Progesterone/ DHEA combination (morning) in conjunction with Pregnenolone/ DHEA (two drops, most nights), and I can report that ameliorates virtually all mood problems.
How long have you being doing this? what happens when you stop it?
 

Fractality

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Some people are very hypo and if their thyroid is damaged they probably need to take something chronically.

What would be the most common causes of thyroid damage? Malnutrition? Stress? Drug use? And by damage, do you mean autoimmune type thyroid disorders? I've never read anything of Peat's about permanent physical thyroid damage.
 

haidut

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What would be the most common causes of thyroid damage? Malnutrition? Stress? Drug use? And by damage, do you mean autoimmune type thyroid disorders? I've never read anything of Peat's about permanent physical thyroid damage.

Usually stress, but diet high in PUFA, alcohol/drug abuse, etc would all contribute. He has mentioned many times "thyroid failure" and Broda Barnes has also written a lot on that topic and said that for some people thyroid supplementation may need to be long term for this reason.
 

Arnold Grape

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How long have you being doing this? what happens when you stop it?
For many months, I had used topical, low dose Pregnenolone/ DHEA until I developed not desirable symptoms. This combination must have anti-inflammatory qualities, however, because almost completely it reduces my asthma symptoms when put on my chest. I tend to still take two drops of this combination, but mostly before bed or when symptoms occur. This also seems to promote deep, quality sleep. Progesterone/ DHEA I have experimented with for a few months and two drops in the morning seems to evoke a mood shift. When appropriate, I will stagger or discontinue these doses and do not experience any type of withdrawal symptoms. The idea is to use these things in relation to stress. I'm not sure if asthma symptoms might be considered as such.
 

EIRE24

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Usually stress, but diet high in PUFA, alcohol/drug abuse, etc would all contribute. He has mentioned many times "thyroid failure" and Broda Barnes has also written a lot on that topic and said that for some people thyroid supplementation may need to be long term for this reason.
Would alcohol use really damage thyroid?
 

Vinero

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For many months, I had used topical, low dose Pregnenolone/ DHEA until I developed not desirable symptoms. This combination must have anti-inflammatory qualities, however, because almost completely it reduces my asthma symptoms when put on my chest. I tend to still take two drops of this combination, but mostly before bed or when symptoms occur. This also seems to promote deep, quality sleep. Progesterone/ DHEA I have experimented with for a few months and two drops in the morning seems to evoke a mood shift. When appropriate, I will stagger or discontinue these doses and do not experience any type of withdrawal symptoms. The idea is to use these things in relation to stress. I'm not sure if asthma symptoms might be considered as such.
Endotoxin or bacterial overgrowth can also cause hypothyroidism and asthma. It has also been shown that excessive nitrates can contribute to bad gut bacteria. Also cocoa seems to boost good bacteria.
 

haidut

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Would alcohol use really damage thyroid?

Not directly, but through hypoglycemia and elevated FFA, as well as endotoxin and liver damage it can do so over time.
 

vulture

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Usually stress, but diet high in PUFA, alcohol/drug abuse, etc would all contribute. He has mentioned many times "thyroid failure" and Broda Barnes has also written a lot on that topic and said that for some people thyroid supplementation may need to be long term for this reason.
Have you read "Hypothyroidism: the unsuspected illness"? Do you think it's a good thing to read or is it outdated? I'm considering buying it.
 

Vinero

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Has anyone you know reversed hypothyroidism without using thyroid hormones? And I'm talking also about stopping DHEA or anything else beside good food and lifestyle and having a good thyroid function
I was hypothyroid in my teens because of crappy food. Since depleting my PUFA my health has drastically improved. Not claiming my health is perfect, but simply Peating has greatly improved my metabolism compared to when I was in my teens. And I have never taken thyroid.
 

haidut

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Have you read "Hypothyroidism: the unsuspected illness"? Do you think it's a good thing to read or is it outdated? I'm considering buying it.

I think I read it a few years back. From what I remember it does not have much that Peat has not already covered in his articles.
 

Fractality

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Usually stress, but diet high in PUFA, alcohol/drug abuse, etc would all contribute. He has mentioned many times "thyroid failure" and Broda Barnes has also written a lot on that topic and said that for some people thyroid supplementation may need to be long term for this reason.

I see, I'm guessing the thyroid can be restarted/regenerated though if all those insults are minimized or eliminated since the thymus atrophies under certain conditions and regenerates under others.
 

raypeatclips

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For many months, I had used topical, low dose Pregnenolone/ DHEA until I developed not desirable symptoms. This combination must have anti-inflammatory qualities, however, because almost completely it reduces my asthma symptoms when put on my chest. I tend to still take two drops of this combination, but mostly before bed or when symptoms occur. This also seems to promote deep, quality sleep. Progesterone/ DHEA I have experimented with for a few months and two drops in the morning seems to evoke a mood shift. When appropriate, I will stagger or discontinue these doses and do not experience any type of withdrawal symptoms. The idea is to use these things in relation to stress. I'm not sure if asthma symptoms might be considered as such.

What were the not desirable symptoms you developed?
 

Arnold Grape

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What were the not desirable symptoms you developed?
It’s important to phrase this in a way that won’t make it sound like my symptoms will be universal. When I first started PanSterone, I used four drops topically, morning and night, to great effect. Over time, however, and without much interruption of this dosing pattern, I began to experience feelings of paranoia and loss of weight. This was probably somewhat haphazard. IME, all neurosteroids have a cumulative effect and this was probably more than I needed at that time. Now, generally, I do not use more than two drops daily, and within that schedule, I try and stagger those doses, if that is possible.
 

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