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Protocol For Curing Type 2 Diabetes, Anyone?

Discussion in 'Blood Sugar' started by yerrag, Aug 26, 2018.

  1. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Has anyone here ever attempted to cure type 2 diabetes successfully?

    A friend just started diabetes medication, and in a party we were in, he passed out because the medication made his blood sugar go way low. I told him I'll see if I can provide a method where he can get his condition cured. I've been thinking about it for a week, and I can write down what I think will work. But I'd like to hear from our collective what you have that has already worked.

    Thanks.
     
  2. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    I would think B vitamins, gelatin, magnesium, and taurine would be a great combo.
     
  3. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Thanks. I had not thought of these except for vitamin B3. How does each of these help?
     
  4. marcar72

    marcar72 Member

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    Google each one individually with "diabetes" as the second search term. You'll see favorable results!
     
  5. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Thanks, but it gets too broad and muddied when Google also gives me many good leads as well as bad.

    I'll look them up and thanks for the ideas!
     
  6. Suikerbuik

    Suikerbuik Member

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    Depends, is he overweight? If so reduce fat intake and get him of the couch. Hour long walks, gardening, and all other forms of gentle exercise improve insulin sensitivty. If he is not overweight, get him to rest as much as possible, to lower serotonin, cortisol, prolactin, and else and focus on an inflammatory lowering diet.
     
  7. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Thanks very much for your insights. I had not though about these approaches, and I was focused on the free fatty acid and PUFA aspects of diabetes, and I'll have to add your insights to what I picked up from here: Elevated PUFA In Blood Drive Metabolic Syndrome And Diabetes

    Your thoughts on exercise will counts a lot as well.
     
  8. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I also would like to find a good source for fructose, as the fructose commonly found is made from corn, and Ray has talked about it being allergenic. I understand there are fructose that's derived from cane sugar and from beets. But I can't source them out. And when I do, I still have to make sure they are free from allergens.

    Glucose and sucrose for diabetes. :

    In 1874, E. Kulz in Germany reported that diabetics could assimilate fructose better than glucose. In the next decades there were several more reports on the benefits of feeding fructose, including the reduction of glucose in the urine. With the discovery of insulin in 1922, fructose therapy was practically forgotten, until the 1950s when new manufacturing techniques began to make it economical to use.
    Its use in diabetic diets became so popular that it became available in health food stores, and was also used in hospitals for intravenous feeding.
    However, while fructose was becoming popular, the cholesterol theory of heart disease was being promoted...

    ...In the 1950s, an English professor, John Yudkin, didn't accept the idea that eating saturated fat was the cause of high blood levels of triglycerides and cholesterol, but he didn’t question the theory that lipids in the blood caused the circulatory disease. He argued that it was sugar, especially the fructose component of sucrose, rather than dietary fat, that caused the high blood lipids seen in the affluent countries, and consequently the diseases...

    ...Following the publication of Yudkin's books, and coinciding with increasing promotion of the health benefits of unsaturated vegetable oils, many people were converted to Yudkin's version of the lipid theory of heart disease, i.e., that the "bad lipids" in the blood are the result of eating sugar. This has grown into essentially a cult, in which sugar is believed to act like an intoxicant, forcing people to eat until they become obese, and develop the "metabolic syndrome," and "diabetes," and the many problems that derive from that.

    Such a shame that we can't find the fructose that used to be available in health food stores in the 1950's. Touche.
     
  9. LCohen

    LCohen Member

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    Ray once quoted high dose brewer's yeast and DHEA for curing diabetes.

    "...brewer’s yeast has been used successfully to treat diabetes. In the 1930s, my father had severe diabetes, but after a few weeks of living on brewer’s yeast, he recovered and never had any further evidence of diabetes..."

    "...many people with diabetes have used brewer’s yeast and DHEA to improve their sugar metabolism. In diabetes, very little sugar enters the cells, so fatigue is a problem..."

    Magnesium and Taurine are also great for diabetes.
     
  10. benaoao

    benaoao Member

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    Look up Kempner’s protocols online, or Denise Mingers post about those doctors who reversed diabetes in 2 weeks “in defense of low fat”

    I doubt that it’s needed to do the extreme first phase (less than 5% protein and fat) however the principles of rice, sugar, vegetables and extra lean meat/skim milk are very versatile.

    If he doesn’t cheat and responds like Kempner’s patients he has a 60% chance of never needing drugs again assuming he sticks to low fat dieting
     
  11. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Yes, I recall Ray mentioning brewer's yeast. I wonder if he was able to elaborate more on that. What kind of brewer's yeast is it, and what is the dosage? It worked on his father, on his father's own research efforts, and that made quite an impression on the young Ray Peat then. Ray Peat didn't get to share the source of his father's successful cure from diabetes.

    Do you have reference to Ray mentioning DHEA for curing diabetes? Would also appreciate references on magnesium and taurine as far as diabetes is concerned.

    I read that Denise' long blog over the weekend, which you posted. Thank you. To be honest, I wouldn't dare recommend rice to a diabetic. I would much rather go with finding pure fructose than pure glucose from rice. If I were the diabetic, I would be willing to try it, but when it's for somebody else, there's Murphy's Law :(
     
  12. LCohen

    LCohen Member

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    Ray's Quote:
    Diabetes, scleroderma, oils and hormones

    Brewer's Yeast:
    Brewer's Yeast Improves Glycemic Indices in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
    Effects of chromium and yeast supplements on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in diabetic men. - PubMed - NCBI (Chromium can be helpful too)

    Magnesium and taurine don't need an introduction. They are well known and must be used whatsoever.
     
  13. Hans

    Hans Member

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    How severe is his condition? I don't know if you saw the post that Haidut made about people actually getting diabatic medicine prescribed to them, while they aren't even really diabetic. Their insulin response post glucose test might differ from someone else's, but then returns to baseline and is normal after a while. So it's a miss diagnose.

    But anyways, elevated free fatty acids in the blood with elevated glucose causes insulin resistance; inhibiting his lipolysis would be a great first step.
    Niacinamide, aspirin and vitamin E are of course good. 3g niacinamide has effectively been used in many studies (over the years) against insulin resistance.
    6-9g aspirin daily replaced insulin requirements in type 1 diabetics in less than a month, although they had to restart taking insulin after a few days of quitting the aspirin; so short term high dose aspirin didn't cure them. 100IU vitamin E daily will help prevent lipid peroxidation and protect against PUFAs. So a good short term treatment could be 3g niacinamide, 3g aspirin and 100IU vitamin E for a month or two, and then the dosages can be reduced from then on.

    After inhibiting lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation it would be good to restart his glucose oxidation. Vitamin B1 and biotin will help do this. 300mg vitamin B1 and 5mg biotin three times a day, preferably with a big meal. Studies show that 15mg biotin daily is very effective for diabetics. Then the other B vitamins are also very important, such as B2 (<20mg) and B6 (<10mg).

    15g glycine has also been shown to be very effective (5g 3 times daily).
    An optimal intake of salt and calcium is also very important. Aldosterone will waste potassium and magnesium at the expense of sodium, and will also activate parathyroid hormone. A salt deficiency will first increase renin and then angiotensin and then aldosterone; angiotensin then activates NADPH oxidase which increases reactive oxygen species, which will contribute to an increase in oxidative stress, inflammation, insulin resistance etc.
    Low calcium intake will increase parathyroid hormone, which will suppress thyroid function and also increase aldosterone. So vitamin D must also be optimal to increase the absorption of calcium.

    Diabetics have an increase in endotoxins, so avoiding any gut irritating/endotoxin producing foods is very important. Activated charcoal, coconut oil/MCT oil, ginger (5-HT3 antagonist) and lysine (5-HT4 and NO antagonist) is excellent for lowering endotoxins, serotonin and nitric oxide produced in the gut. An elimination diet would work best to identify problematic foods. Improving digestion would be fundamental, so using vinegar with a meal can aid in digestion.

    GABA is used to regenerate the beta-cells of the pancreas. But because he is not type I, it might not be necessary to supplement with GABA directly.
    Taurine, glycine, theanine, proline, niacinamide, valerian root, magnesium, B1, etc, increase GABA. GABA will help to lower cortisol, prolactin and serotonin.

    MCT is like the fructose of fats. It doesn't require transporters to enter cells and the mitochondria to be oxidized, and doesn't interfere with glucose oxidation. It increases energy expenditure, aids in fat loss, uncouples, provides ketones (even when eaten together with carbs), and helps a damaged liver. 75g of MCT oil is shown to completely reverse liver cirrhosis.

    Fixing circadian rhythm will also improve glucose tolerance, but that can be hard, if not impossible, if there are still some underlying nutritional deficiencies such as vitamin D, magnesium, etc. It would also help to wake up just before the sun starts rising and then look at/in the direction of the sun for about 10 minutes (minimum) as it rises. This will provide healing red light, help to suppress melatonin and serotonin, and will also help with the circadian rhythm. Getting enough sunlight on the skin during the day (at least 30min - 1hr daily) would be optimal.

    And last but not least, exercise and sweating will be great to help increase circulation and remove toxins from the body. Exercise doesn't have to be intense, and sweating can also be accomplished by sauna or just being in the sun.
     
  14. aquaman

    aquaman Member

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    Use the search function!

    Start with diabetes and specify user Haidut (all forum search), he has posted tons of stuff on this.
     
  15. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    the key is to go on a high sugar/high starch very low fat diet. That's basically it. The reversals of type 2 have taken place on vegetarian diets but there is no need for that. Very low fat. PUFAs will diminish.

    Aspirin can help. But very low fat is the key so the body burns of PUFAs and begins to burn sugar again. Thyroid T3/T4 may be helpful and some vitamins along the way.
     
  16. yurt

    yurt Member

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    Absent chronic malnutrition or poisoning, diabetes type 2 in humans has been demonstrated to be driven by fatty infiltration of the liver and pancreas, causing:

    1. Hyperglycemia, because the pancreas cannot secrete insulin in sufficient quantities, and

    2. Lack of suppression of endogenous glucose production when exogenous glucose is added (the liver is "deaf" to insulin signalling).

    (For a more detailed explanation, see Carb-Sane Asylum - The Cause of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes)

    Highly recommended read: Insulin: understanding its action in health and disease

    So the cure is to get the liver and pancreas lean again. There are many posts on this forum discussing how to improve liver health. The quickest and possibly most painful way is a short-term calorie-restricted diet, as was demonstrated by Newcastle University's Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT).
     
  17. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    That is also possible.

    But I believe it's really hard to know without a glucose tolerance test being done, and that isn't done often. If they were done, plenty of hypoglycemic cases would be discovered, and diabetes would be nipped at the bud, as the warning signs of diabetes lie in detecting hypoglycemia early. That is how I avoided diabetes. Diabetes and hypoglycemia are both blood sugar regulation problems, and they start from the same cause. One is early stage, the other is a later stage.

    So much for early detection though. The medical establishment likes to push mammography as early detection for breast cancer, causing more breast cancer, and then practices a double standard by not using glucose tolerance tests, maybe because it really gives warning signs of diabetes. And it's good business to treat rather than prevent diabetes.
     
  18. KennethKaniff

    KennethKaniff Member

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    Very low fat is the key. Look up Kempner's "rice diet," which contained a lot of fruit and sugar (along with the rice) despite the name.
     
  19. ecstatichamster

    ecstatichamster Member

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    Exactly. Very simple.
     
  20. OP
    yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    I don't think I can tell that to the person who is diabetic. I'll tell them it is very complicated. And he would have to be lucky to be part of the 63% of the people whose FBS dropped, and not be one of the 15% whose FBS rose significantly.

    In Defense of Low Fat: A Call for Some Evolution of Thought (Part 1) :

    In this report, Kempner analyzed 100 diabetics who’d entered the rice diet program between 1944 and 1955. All of them strictly followed the diet for at least three months (often much longer), and they were observed an average of nearly two years—with some folks monitored for up to eleven years after they’d first embarked on the carby cuisine.

    The findings? Ladies and gents, place your bets…

    More than half of those 100 diabetic ricers—63%—actually saw their fasting blood sugar drop by at least 20 mg/dL during the diet. Only 15% had their blood sugar go up significantly. The remaining 22 saw little to no change.


    The study did show this is a step in the right direction, but there are holes to be plugged still. This study is decades ago, and since that time we have added to our store of knowledge, and applying what we learned since then would increase the odds for success.

     
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