Older Adults Less Fatigued Than Younger Generation

Discussion in 'Health' started by j., Dec 15, 2013.

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  1. j.

    j. Guest

    Read the rest.
     
  2. OP
    j.

    j. Guest

    More generations exposed to PUFA?
     
  3. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    That's my first thought. As each generation goes by the metabolism gets lower and lower. Before, the heart attacks and things like that would start happening in the 50 and 60 year olds. Then it started slowly dropping. Now you got 20 year olds having heart attacks, and kids with diabetes and other metabolic diseases. And I believe its going to get worse and worse.
     
  4. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    And with lower metabolism comes less energy, less motivation, etc etc.
     
  5. freal

    freal Member

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    Yes, its really sad what has happened to the young generation. Also its getting worse and worse.

    I am not sure its just the pufas, 1990s were a time when the food supply really changed. China entered the market and started exporting their sawage food. They manipulated the markets by price dumping and practically wiped out a lot of western farmes. Try getting a non-chinese garlic. By 1999 practically every cheap consumer product was made in China.

    Also in the 1990s at least in Europe all the countries in EU practically trowed their food industry regulation (not just food, but also financial) out the window and everything was replaced by this common EU law. I mean what a fraud, until this all countries tested slaugterhouse animals for biological and chemical contamination, now its just "visual" examination.
    Every regulation went down the toilet, not only that, but the EU regulation was written by the corporations themselvs, just for example EU paid sugar factories and producers to shut down, like a few million euros to stop producing and buldoze the sugar factory (it was EU taxpayer money). By 2008-2011 when only a few big sugar producers remained they jacked up the price (by market manipulating), also thanks to EU that shredded all the anti-monopoly laws the european countries had in place before. Price manipulating used to be illegal prior to 2001.
     
  6. Dutchie

    Dutchie Member

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    Throughout the years,starting from the 80s/90s food has become less quality actual ingredient food,being replaced by fabricated placebos acting as food.
    When you used to buy bread it was only 3to4ingredients...nowadays you need a sciencedegree to decipher ingredientlabels!
     
  7. pboy

    pboy Member

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    its probably a combo of the poor food, the new hormones and GMO's, the lack of iodine since the late 80's...and all the technology leading to more stress and less
    activity...more sitting in one place for a long time. I remember growing up in the 90's kids still played outside more than inside...it was probably around the advent of high speed internet...maybe 2002 or so where there was a dramatic shift
     
  8. jyb

    jyb Member

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    I wasn't aware that was an issue. Aren't most table salt brands with added iodine?
     
  9. OP
    j.

    j. Guest

    Peat thinks excess iodine is a bigger problem.
     
  10. pboy

    pboy Member

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    I mean...yea, its one thing I don't necessarily agree with in the totality of this diet. A peat based diet with plenty of milk and eggs would put you right at the daily requirement...or minimum requirement, which is just that...a necessary bare minimum (150mcg). Maybe its just my metabolism and the fact that I could stand to grow a little (even though Im 'fully grown'). It was estimated from baked good alone people used to get an average of 500mcg iodine daily in America up until the late 80's. Ive read studies comparing breaskmilk values of iodine and it varies highly with the diet, but had even amounts of 70mcg per 1 cup (~170 calories). Salt does have iodine in it, some salt, but most places don't use it anymore, not even packaged food...and you'd have to eat almost 2g of sodium from it just to get the bare minimum. Radioactive, added, synthetically created iodine is bad for everyone. But from seafood, seaweed? I don't think its a problem and might actually be a huge bonus. Ive consumed 2-3mg worth of iodine in a day before and didn't notice any negative effects. A lot of seaweed contains metals, chelation agents, and irritants. Many people are allergic to seafood proteins...I think those are the culprits moreso than the iodine itself. All my opinion. I think Peat realizes the importance of iodine, but also the negative affects of certain foods containing it or synthetic versions, so he lays out a situation where people naturally get a good amount of gentle iodine from milk and eggs. I wouldn't be surprised if many americans these days were actually deficient, but who knows

    *just wanted to add, I think most people following Peat's food recommendations are getting enough iodine...not something we probably have to worry about. But for many americans, who fear dairy and eggs...and just eat lean chicken and stuff, and a combo of the bromine in the flours, fluoride in water (which both reduce bodily iodine), and most kids pretty much never eat seafood unless theyre Asian or maybe some sushi on occasion, are very likely iodine deficient. It affects growth and development as well as metabolism
     
  11. jyb

    jyb Member

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    @pboy: But what makes you think 150mcg is on the low side? Government recommended daily intakes are not reliable guides as we know (eg, protein recommendations off by almost 100%). It would be interesting to know what 24 hours of normal production of T3 requires in terms of iodine (T3 and rT3 need iodine), shouldn't be hard to compute but then need to take into account loads of other variables like how much the body stores and in what conditions - so I trust RP when he says that milk and stuff provides enough. It seems that only in some special cases did he recommend iodine or selenium as supplements, I think unresponsiveness to thyroid being one.
     
  12. pboy

    pboy Member

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    yea I agree its really hard to tell because theres no telling exactly how well the body stores or retains iodine...but being that's its a water soluble and can even be gaseous...its likely that its doesn't stick around long. Apparently from what I've read, certain plastic chemicals and bromine (some flours, lots of over the counter and pharmaceutical medication) and fluoride (added to some tap water) displace iodine out of the body, and that large amounts can be urinated out from food sources. Many Asians eat more than the upper limit recommendation every day ...consistenly, and don't seem to exhibit any thyroid problems. A 2000 calorie translation from healthy breastmilk would be about 260 - 900 mcg iodine...obviously babies need more because they are growing and brain is developing...but I really still think 150mcg is definatly a bare minimum given all the other factors that play in, and probably 1100 mcg is not the upper limit...more like probably 3000 mcg (3 g). So don't supplement iodine, but don't fear it from food sources at all. Even iodized salt which isn't an ideal form of iodine only has 40mcg on average per 1/4 tsp...so you could potentially get enough from iodized salt alone, but it would be extremely hard to reach any sort of toxic limit from salt alone...basically you have to take a supplement or eat like 3lbs of seafood every day to each a toxic limit (or chemo, radioactive iodine treatment....LOL, how dumb are people to let someone do that to them)
     
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