Is Sugar Toxic?

Discussion in 'Sugar, Honey' started by messtafarian, Aug 24, 2013.

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  1. messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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  2. jyb

    jyb Member

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    The usual Robert Lustig debate and rehashed common misconceptions.
     
  3. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    No! Once you get past the 12th grade rehash of " The History of Sugar" it says:

    Not only do many worrying fructose studies use unrealistic doses of the sugar unaccompanied by glucose, it also turns out that the rodents researchers have studied metabolize fructose in a very different way than people do—far more different than originally anticipated. Studies that have traced fructose’s fantastic voyage through the human body suggest that the liver converts as much as 50 percent of fructose into glucose, around 30 percent of fructose into lactate and less than one percent into fats. In contrast, mice and rats turn more than 50 percent of fructose into fats, so experiments with these animals would exaggerate the significance of fructose’s proposed detriments for humans, especially clogged arteries, fatty livers and insulin resistance.

    In a series of meta-analyses examining dozens of human studies, John Sievenpiper of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and his colleagues found no harmful effects of typical fructose consumption on body weight, blood pressure or uric acid production. In a 2011 study, Sam Sun—a nutrition scientist at Archer Daniels Midland, a major food processing corporation—and his colleagues analyzed data about sugar consumption collected from more than 25,000 Americans between 1999 and 2006. Their analysis confirmed that people almost never eat fructose by itself and that for more than 97 percent of people fructose contributes less daily energy than other sugars. They did not find any positive associations between fructose consumption and levels of trigylcerides, cholesterol or uric acid, nor any significant link to waist circumference or body mass index (BMI)
     
  4. Peata

    Peata Member

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    Reading some of the comments below the article, and just recalling what I've read in diet and health forums over the years, so many talk about sugar addiction. During my low carbing I also thought the draw toward sugar was because it was addictive - a habit to break. Thanks to the demonizing of sugar, I thought it was bad. When really, my body was just trying to get me to ingest something it really needed. It took some retraining of my thoughts not to feel guilty or like I was damaging my health when I started Peat. Now I don't think twice about giving my body and brain the sugar it needs. It's kind of remarkable.
     
  5. gretchen

    gretchen Member

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    My low-sugar years (which began in the late 90s when I first heard the idea of "sugar addiction") weren't happy. I have known people who have had things like endometriosis likely from refusing to eat any kind of sugar (the resulting estrogen dominance that you get from aging anyway; just makes it worse) At this point we've read this story over and over- we're all eating food with too much added sugar and should cut back, etc. The MSM serves mostly to indoctrinate and little else.
     
  6. OP
    messtafarian

    messtafarian Member

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    Yep. Kinda humbling to see the real reason I've felt like crap for the past twenty years. I drank the sugar-free koolaid.
     
  7. 4peatssake

    4peatssake Member

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    Me too. :cry:
     
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