Coffee Linked To 66% Lower Chance Of Cirrhosis Death

Discussion in 'Health' started by haidut, Apr 5, 2014.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    The beneficial consumption was 2+ cups a day, which translates to 200mg+ of caffeine a day, assuming caffeine is the substance with responsible for most of the beneficial effects of coffee on liver.

    http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/PressRele ... 10553.html

    "...Findings indicate that those who drank at least 20 g of ethanol daily had a greater risk of cirrhosis mortality compared to non-drinker. In contrast, coffee intake was associated with a lower risk of death from cirrhosis, specifically for non-viral hepatitis related cirrhosis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a chronic liver disease related to the metabolic syndrome and more sedentary affluent lifestyle, likely predominates among the non-viral hepatitis related cirrhosis group. In fact, subjects who drank two or more cups per day had a 66% reduction in mortality risk, compared to non-daily coffee drinkers."
     
  2. paper_clips43

    paper_clips43 Member

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    Why would it only be specific to non-viral hepatitis?
    It basically says it had no effect, either good or bad. on hepatitis-b related cirrhosis?
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Keep in mind that it was an epidemiological study, so it won't necessarily capture all relationships. I have seen rodent studies with caffeine showing benefit for viral hepatitis - both C and B types. I am pretty convinced that caffeine/coffee is by far the best substance you can give your liver for both pathogen disease and fattiness.
     
  4. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    Maybe it deals with the fat accumulation aspect, while "viruses" might cause damage by some other means.
     
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