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Tetracyclines (and A Few Other Antibiotics) As A Cure For Cancer

Discussion in 'Cancer' started by haidut, Jan 29, 2015.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    It is a bit early to say that this will change the current perceptions on cancer, but the article does read like it came from Peat himself. Ironically, the suggestion to try antibiotics came from a 6-year old child which further strengthens the hypothesis that children are much much smarter than adults and should be taken more seriously than your average 50-year old medical doctor. The antibiotic that did best was doxycycline.

    http://metro.co.uk/2015/01/29/girl-8-fi ... 2/?ito=v-a

    "...Incredibly, some of the most dangerous cancer cells were killed by several, widely used antibiotics. As a result, Camilla has been named in the journal Oncotarget as one of the report’s authors. Doxycycline, a drug that is used to treat acne and can cost 6p a day, was particularly promising while some fought breast, prostate, lung and brain tumours."

    The actual study further supports Peat's view of cancer as a problem of organization, and mentions the other drugs that were successful. Unsurprisingly, tetracycline is also among the list.
    Finally, based on the study it looks like these antibiotics can be used for cancer prevention, again as matching Peat's recommendations. In the absense of access to those antibiotics, the similar molecules of vitamin K, emodin, lapachon, etc will probably be just as useful for prevention.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25625193

    "...This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of "stemness", independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point - a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for the clonal expansion and survival of cancer stem cells. Interestingly, several classes of FDA-approved antibiotics inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis as a known "side-effect", which could be harnessed instead as a "therapeutic effect". Based on this analysis, we now show that 4-to-5 different classes of FDA-approved drugs can be used to eradicate cancer stem cells, in 12 different cancer cell lines, across 8 different tumor types (breast, DCIS, ovarian, prostate, lung, pancreatic, melanoma, and glioblastoma (brain)). These five classes of mitochondrially-targeted antibiotics include: the erythromycins, the tetracyclines, the glycylcyclines, an anti-parasitic drug, and chloramphenicol. Functional data are presented for one antibiotic in each drug class: azithromycin, doxycycline, tigecycline, pyrvinium pamoate, as well as chloramphenicol, as proof-of-concept. Importantly, many of these drugs are non-toxic for normal cells, likely reducing the side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Thus, we now propose to treat cancer like an infectious disease, by repurposing FDA-approved antibiotics for anti-cancer therapy, across multiple tumor types. These drug classes should also be considered for prevention studies, specifically focused on the prevention of tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Finally, recent clinical trials with doxycycline and azithromycin (intended to target cancer-associated infections, but not cancer cells) have already shown positive therapeutic effects in cancer patients, although their ability to eradicate cancer stem cells was not yet appreciated."

    The study above references a few other in vivo studies using doxycycline for treating animal models of bone, pancreatic, breast, and brain cancers. The success rate of doxycycline was in the range of eliminating tumors in 70%-80% of the animals. The oral dosage used was 15mg/kg for a mouse, equivalent to a human dose of <100mg. The 100mg dose was effective for all types of cancer except pancreatic, which required higher dosage of 800mg (according to the authors' estimates). Most doxycycline products come in 100mg pills, so it looks like a typical dose of 100mg daily should be effective against 9 out of the 10 cancer types tested, with virtually no side effects give the low dose.
     
  2. Such_Saturation

    Such_Saturation Member

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    To be technical, many chemotherapy molecules are called antibiotics. Well, off to stockpile some tetracycline.
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    One of the authors rubbed some tetracycline on a mole and it disappeared. Several stores online sell tetracycline ointments without prescription so maybe not a bad idea to buy some and try on some moles for people prone to getting moles/spots.
     
  4. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    Thanks for the idea!
     
  5. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Of course, this implies that vitamin K should also work and that's definitely easier to find:):
     
  6. Peata

    Peata Member

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    Elaborate, please.
     
  7. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    I'm going to try this for mole removal.
     
  8. Peata

    Peata Member

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    looking forward to your results.
     
  9. dd99

    dd99 Member

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    I'm going to try this for cherry angiomas...
     
  10. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    Thanks Peata! I will report back on my results. Please tell us how it goes with your cherry angiomas dd99!
     
  11. Peata

    Peata Member

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    just to be clear, Blossom, are you using tetracylcine or vitamin k for moles?
     
  12. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    As per Peat's writings and readily verifiable online, vitamin K, emodin, lapachon, and the tetracycline antibiotics class are really the same substance, with varying potency. I think he said that they are in increasing potency in the order I listed them. So, depending on the potency ratio you should be able to achieve what tetracycline does by taking say a higher dose vitamin K. However, the studies with vitamin K show potent anti-cancer effects both for prevention and treatment in human doses 100mg-150mg daily, which is suspiciously close to the therapeutic doses of doxycycline (100mg+ daily). That makes me think that for cancer prevention and treatment vitamin K may not be that much "weaker" than the tetracyclines.
     
  13. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    Well since I have some vitamin k on hand I will probably try that first. I ordered some minocycline from farmacia that should arrive in a couple weeks but I'm wondering if it would work the same as tetracycline? I would think it so but maybe haidut will chime in with his thoughts?
     
  14. Ben

    Ben Member

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    How does vitamin K work as an antibiotic?
     
  15. Peata

    Peata Member

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    OK, when you come up with a way to use the vitamin K topically (I assume you mean you'll open a capsule and use the powder or dissolve a pill of it), let us know.
     
  16. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    I was just going to puncture a life extension vitamin k and use the contents of that tonight. I'll probably cover it with a bandage.
     
  17. narouz

    narouz Member

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    Sounds good, Blossom!
    One thing you might consider:
    I can't remember which interview it was in.
    I listened to it recently,
    so I think it was a recent Peat interview.
    I remember him specifying that when treating moles/spots topically with...I believe it was progesterone...
    that one should place the progesterone adjacent to the spot/mole.
    Not right on it.

    I can't remember how he explained this.
     
  18. Blossom

    Blossom Moderator

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    Thanks narouz! I'm going to experiment with the vitamin k for a couple weeks and see if I notice a difference and if not I will definitely try the Progest-e! Maybe I'll measure the mole for comparison.
     
  19. charlie

    charlie The Law & Order Admin

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    narouz, thats good to know. :hattip
     
  20. narouz

    narouz Member

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    I'm not entirely sure it was progesterone,
    but I think so.
    He was talking about topically treating...what?...
    it was either suspicious moles/spots
    or maybe just age spots...I think it was the former.

    I think I may have it in some notes I made.
    But it stuck in my head because it seemed kinda weird.
    Probably that nutty Roseanne Barr-like woman interrupted him
    as he was trying to explain why one should do it like that... :cry:
     
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