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Facial Deformity May Be An Indication Of Early Life Stress

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    A few people have asked Peat about bodily facial and torso deformities and he has said it is likely due to high estrogen, especially in early childhood. This recent study seems to add evidence to that hypothesis by showing that crooked bite (a type of facial deformity) is an indication of stress exposure in early life. I find the study interesting because it also mentioned another metric that Peat often talks about but is virtually unknown in the medical world - i.e. the environmental quality during the first 1,000 days since conception have profound impact on both the lifespan and healthspan of the person. So, lower face symmetry can be used as a quick and reliable way to judge systemic health status. I know of a few studies, which showed that survivors of traumatic events who developed PTSD experienced changes in facial structure, and recovery from PTSD coincided with restoration of previous facial structure.
    The bad news is that apparently such facial deformity records are no longer being collected in the US since the 1970s, which means that there is no current data for the US population. That is unfortunate, as it is a very reliable and non-invasive way of determining if the population is getting healthier or sicker (on average). Anecdotally, there have been quite a few discussions on this forum, and especially on Reddit about how modern celebrities have weird, gaunt and "fake" faces compared to famous people in the 1960s and earlier. I doubt that this is a coincidence, considering this study and other factoids mentioned by Peat.

    Lower face asymmetry as a marker for developmental instability
    "...The findings suggest that lower face asymmetries are a marker for environmental stress and cerebral lateralization during early development."

    Crooked bite may indicate early life stress, UW study suggests | UW HSNewsBeat

    "...Research has repeatedly confirmed that the first 1,000 days after conception strongly influence a person’s life expectancy and susceptibility to chronic diseases. The primary marker used to identify early life stress is low birth weight, which can, for instance, indicate poor nutrition of the mother during pregnancy. But low birth weight is a marker only until birth, about 280 days – far short of a measurement useful for the first thousand days. New research from University of Washington investigators suggests that an asymmetric lower face is a novel marker that also captures early life stresses that occur after birth."

    "...“Asymmetries in the skull and teeth have been used for decades by anthropologists to mark environmental stress, but they have only rarely been used in living populations,” said Philippe Hujoel, the corresponding author. “Such lower-face asymmetries can be assessed by looking at the dental bite in the permanent teeth – an exam that can be completed in seconds and with more certainty than a mother’s recall of birth weight and more ease than a search for a birth certificate.”

    "...The team had to look back four decades for data because in the 1970’s, he said, dental researchers in charge of designing U.S. surveys began to disregard the value of diagnosing facial asymmetry, and stopped taking those measurements. “From a biological perspective, this decision resulted in an inability to reliably track trends in the U.S.,” Hujoel said. "We don’t have current information on the prevalence of lower-face asymmetries in the U.S. population.”
     
  2. acrylic

    acrylic Member

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    I'm getting surgery for a maxillary deformity (crooked and too high) in about 9 months.
     
  3. Lecarpetron

    Lecarpetron Member

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    I'm 6 months into wearing palate expanders to aid my crooked/underdeveloped jaw. Since I've had them, I notice jaw development when I am out in public on each person I see. Among native-born US adults, I would guess that fewer than 10% have truly good jaw development.

    It's not just asymmetry, also generally how forward the maxilla grows. When you position your head with eyes pointing straight forward, do your teeth point straight forward, or do they point down? An example of poor jaw development on left, good jaw on right in attachment.

    upload_2017-4-17_16-45-13.png
     
  4. LukeL

    LukeL Member

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    @haidut this is slightly off topic but do you have any ideas from a Peat perspective why Bell's Palsy occurs?
     
  5. acrylic

    acrylic Member

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    Yeah I'd agree.

    I'm going to be going under the knife for maxillomandibular advancement in 6-9 months. Getting advanced ~10mm.
     
  6. encerent

    encerent Member

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    Wow that's going to be a major surgery with a massive change.
     
  7. acrylic

    acrylic Member

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    I get massive jaw pain from my uneven bite (one side of my jaw is smaller due to uneven and too-high maxilla), and have trouble speaking at times. Also have apnea from small airway. Should fix both of those things.
     
  8. encerent

    encerent Member

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    I've had a few foreigners remark to me how remarkably ugly americans (in big urban centers) are.

    I've noticed a lot of Indians around here who were born in Inida have excellent facial structure: broad features and maxilla grown forwards. Though a lot of them appear to be ailing from various things since coming to America.
     
  9. encerent

    encerent Member

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    Yeah good luck, moving the maxilla forwards that much should fix a lot of problems and give you a much better looking face. Mike Mew advocates good tongue posture for good facial development. Of course as adults it might be too late for that and surgery may be the only recourse.
     
  10. Diokine

    Diokine Member

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    I have noticed tremendous changes in my facial structure since looking after metabolism. I think my jaw has shifted down and forward probably close to 5mm and my teeth fit together entirely differently than they did one year ago.
     
  11. Lecarpetron

    Lecarpetron Member

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    @acrylic wow, that will be a big surgery. My airway was 3-4 mm in diameter six months ago when I started all of this. The dentist said a normal airway these days is 10 mm, and optimal is closer to 20 mm. It was a tough choice for me between the "slow and steady" of the palate expanders vs. orthognathic surgery. I'm very interested in how it goes for you.

    @Diokine just curious, how old are you?

    About a year ago I moved from a city with many Latin/Caribbean people with great maxilla development to a mostly white town in the north. The difference in craniofacial structure is pretty striking.
     
  12. Constatine

    Constatine Member

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    I have a bad habit of really studying people's faces but because of this I've seen just how often people's faces change (normally for the worse). Almost on a month to month basis someone's face can look radically different.
     
  13. dfspcc20

    dfspcc20 Member

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    Weston A Price right again ;)
    (And Ray Peat too, as always)
     
  14. Diokine

    Diokine Member

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  15. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    Slightly off-topic?
    I think Peat mentioned something about the gut in regards to it. You can try the L.I.G.H.T. search engine to find it.
     
  16. David PS

    David PS Member

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    Two of the early life stresses that may impact facial growth include not being breast feed as an infant and being allowed to such your thumb. A third stress is not chewing enough to strengthen the facial muscles so that the teeth will properly align.

    I recently developed dry mouth and it would wake me at night (maybe estrogen too low?). I stumbled across the you tube videos of Dr. Mike Mew and his father John (both dentists) describing their work on young patients to correct facial deformities in young children (7-9 years preferred although they are working with patients who are older). They make the same type of observations about primitive peoples (no offense intended) having perfect teeth. Their video channel is at Orthotropics and they have 496 videos of various lengths.

    Mike Mew's mantra (if I may be so bold) is:
    1. Teeth together.
    2. Lips together (and sealed)
    3. Tongue resting on the roof of the mouth.

    As a preventive measure, I am chewing a big wad of 7-10 sticks of gum while I am out walking. It is 30-60 minutes of aerobic for may facial muscles and tongue. The result of under use of these muscles are seen in the faces of many older people who wear dentures and avoid chewy foods. If your compare young photos of Steve Hawkins to more recent photos your can see that the disuse of facial muscles has result in has face almost melting into his head rest. It is almost like wax melting. Much like the villain in the end of the first Indiana Jones movie.

    I have also begun taping my mouth shut at night using 3M micro porous tape. I have a full beard and it does not hurt when I pull the tape off my face.
     
  17. Integra

    Integra Member

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    I second the Mike Mew suggestion.

    I would be careful about the second part of the sentence. Being prematurely weaned or not being breast fed at all is bad enough, but preventing children from compensating could do more damage than good, at least in the short term. Sucking is a physiological function that affects everything from facial structure to lung development and psychologically, it creates a sense of safety for the infant or small child.
     
  18. kyle

    kyle Member

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    Be wary of learning about facial degeneration or you will start analyzing every person you meet. :lol:

    I would say day to day changes are quite noticeable.

    Mike Mew's stuff can work on adults, I know that but I've discovered many road blocks and he says as much about adults. It's easier to correct children. Ultimately the entire structure and metabolic function of the body is involved.

    For example Mew talks about jaw and tongue posture. But those systems are connected to the neck, which is connected to the spine, etc. etc. Any imbalance at a point in the chain is going to limit the the ability of the jaw to develop.

    Ultimately, the muscular structure is involved. Which is why Vit D, K and A are necessary parts of the picture not merely at the level of bone health. Muscle weakness = changes in bone. Things supportive to muscle development and bone health will all help reverse stress induced problems - that is from my personal observations.
     
  19. Diokine

    Diokine Member

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    There is so much more I want to say on this topic, but I'll stick with the suckling instinct and lymph flow/throat tissue. I've observed a very close connection between the conscious perception of the tongue and mouth, and how this relates to the tissue in the throat. There seems to be a certain way to hold my tongue that feels "correct," and it is not quite static but pulling along the different parts of my soft palate create suction, and it is almost an unconscious movement initiated by my different moods and reactions to my perceived environment. It feels like a very subtle suckling motion, and it seems to encourage proper form and function of the tissue in the throat as well as proper lymph movement. I'm in agreement that it is the whole metabolic function of the body in general, more precisely the ability of our consciousness to perceive our tissues and to generate the proper biogenic patterns to encourage their optimal function. I've noticed that as my health improves more, the connective tissue in my throat has become much more flexible, and in general feels "younger." I also think that the physical location of the thyroid is important in this respect, as this area of the body is essentially a "tuning fork" providing feedback for many different physiological states that the organism must account for. Call it a chakra or whatever you'd like, but this sort of thing is absolutely a factor to consider.
     
  20. David PS

    David PS Member

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    Thank you. I was thinking about thumb sucking for a prolonged period of time well beyond the infant period of life. I believe that children who are 4 or 5 years old and who are still sucking their thumbs during sleep will be contributing to facial/biting deformities. A transition period could be good. I would think long term transition could create some downstream issues. I apologize for not stating it more precisely and I thank you again for helping me clarify my own thinking (and expression).
     
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