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Borderline Personality Disorder and Thyroid

J

j.

Guest
I was reading in another forum people wondering whether Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and hypothyroidism are related. Link

There is one person who claims that progesterone made her BPD symptoms disappear:

I have been diagnosed with BPD sometime back in 1996. Of course I have been through the gamut of doctors and meds. I just wanted to say that I am not sure if BPD has any link to thyroid but I do know that it has a link to Female menstrual problems. This has been the first time I have had any type of relief from my symptoms of BPD. I found a compounder that made me up some ALL NATURAL PROGESTERONE for some female problems, and I have come to find out that my BPD symptoms are not only controllable but also non existent since I have been taking the Progesterone.
So it might not be for everyone but for me I had a bad lack of Progesterone, not saying I am cured but I am saying that after having BPD symptoms with no relief and now I am great I highly recommend that women should talk to their doctors about this, its worth a shot.


I hope this helps someone...

Good luck.

Liz Jake.
 

pboy

Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2013
Messages
1,681
Peat said in an interview that progesterone and thyroid restore cellular energy, thereby increasing its functioning and taking it out of an inflamed state...so I guess if you're inflamed you would likely have a less stable personality, but Personality Disorder is a really general term, and who gets to define who has a proper or disordered personality? I get the gist of it though, and it makes sense that increasing thyroid and progesterone would probably lead to a more cooperative calm personality
 

Edward

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Joined
Apr 20, 2013
Messages
134
Age
39
The TRH test in patients with borderline personality disorder
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 818390032X

Fifteen patients with a primary diagnosis of borderline personality disorder were studied with the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) test. Twelve carried the additional diagnosis of depression, substance abuse, or both. A blunted thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to TRH was found in seven patients, two of whom were neither depressed nor had the additional diagnosis of depression and/or substance abuse. TSH blunting was unrelated to such factors as thyroid status, serum cortisol, weight, height, or body surface. Since TSH blunting occurs in about 25% of patients with major depression but not in schizophrenia, the findings suggest that some patients with borderline personality disorder share a neuroendocrine abnormality with some affective disorder patients.
 

Edward

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2013
Messages
134
Age
39
Thyroid hormones and personality traits in attempted suicide
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 3009001619

The research on thyroid hormones and personality traits is quite sparse and mainly focused on male forensic psychiatric populations in which the relationship between thyroid hormones and psychopathy and aggression-related personality traits has been reported. The suicidal temperament hypothesis suggests that certain personality traits such as aggression, anxiety proneness, impulsivity, and low socialization may render an individual vulnerable to the risk of suicide. The aim of this study was to investigate personality traits assessed by the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP) in relation to hormones in the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid (HPT) axis in 100 euthyroid suicide attempters. Standard multiple regression analyses were performed with TSH, T3, T4, and the T3/T4 ratio, respectively, as the dependent variable and KSP factors (Anxiety Proneness, Aggressiveness, and Impulsivity) and subscales (Detachment, Social Desirability, and Socialization) as independent variables. In men, but not in women, the regression model of the T3/T4 ratio was significant and the results suggested that high scores on Aggressiveness and low ones on Detachment were associated with a low T3/T4 ratio. These results indicate that HPT function may be related to Aggressiveness and Detachment in male suicide attempters.
 

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