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Using Body Temp

Discussion in 'Monitoring Vitals' started by slayers, Mar 19, 2013.

  1. Asimov

    Asimov Member

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    Excess any-macronutrient consumed will be turned into fat. Not a chance-it's 100% certainty. There's no non-metabolic pathway for eliminating excess calories from inside the "system". It's a closed loop. Once the calories go in, they stay in (barring a physical break in the loop).

    I'm not even saying it's a bad thing; fat does serve a biological purpose. However anyone trying to overlook the absolutely certainty of excess carbohydrate consumption turning into fat are just deluding themselves.
     
  2. jyb

    jyb Member

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    What's your take on how some people just don't gain weight no matter what they eat (or so it seems)? I've always had signs of hypothyroidism (lethargy, acne, insomnia etc) yet it's almost impossible for me to gain weight (except some muscle gain since Peating which has remained despite very little physical effort). As a kid I would occasionally binge eat, especially deserts and buffets where I would eat to the point of stomach pain, and more generally I've never counted calories nor exercised much - I was too tired to do much exercise. If the food is actually absorbed I don't know where the energy went, unless my issue has purely to do with the brain.

    Obviously "excess" is a function of the food itself, thyroid health, maybe genes...
     
  3. Asimov

    Asimov Member

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    I can't say for sure about your issue, but in MY experience with skinny people (myself being one of them) is that they're just not big eaters. They might eat a lot in one sitting if they're hungry, but then they tend to go the rest of the day without eating anything, bringing the daily calories back down to a normal level.

    Your body burns a LOT of calories every day just to stay alive. The occasional binge will get burned away in no time during a subsequent 12-16 hour fast. There's some evidence that eating in that way occasionally can actually improve body composition for whatever reason. So you may legitimately be hypothyroid, but because of your eating habits (timing, macronutrient, whatever) your mitochondria are still burning plenty of fuel and keeping you skinny.

    That's the best I've got :)
     
  4. jyb

    jyb Member

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    Ok thanks, that seems indeed plausible. It doesn't explain everything of course, I think some people put on weight more easily than others even while eating foods not too different.
     
  5. Asimov

    Asimov Member

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    I agree, everyone's basal metabolic rate is different. Even assuming exact identical diet, macronutrients, k-cals, and thyroid function, 2 people will likely gain/lose weight independent of one another. I think on some level people's basal metabolic rate is coded into their genome.

    As a pack animal, it's likely a genetic survival strategy to have widely differing responses to food intake. If everyone was lean year round, one famine wipes out the whole pack, and all the genes.
     
  6. pboy

    pboy Member

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    With healthy clean kidneys you will pee out excess sugar in the blood and with healthy bowels you wont absorb more lipids than necessary and/or they will circulate back and forth through the liver with it having a high capability to store and move fats (also with healthy choline / lecithin / lipoprotein levels). Excess body fat is due to the inability to remove acids adequately and the body using fat (water and/or cholesterol) to buffer, or wrap the acids. The main culprits being lactic acid, uric acid, calcium oxalate crystals, oxidized fats, chemical acids....basically excess fat is just a sign of acid buildup and the inability to sufficiently drain it. If your modes of elimination are healthy you'll feel really full and or get a really sweet feeling when you're nearing an excess of food and it would clearly be unpleasant to continue eating at that point
     
  7. Asimov

    Asimov Member

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    Your body will only piss out dangerously high blood sugar levels. Your body will only defecate out dangerously high lipid intake.

    Preferentially, your body will absorb all possible calories and store any extra as fat. If this were not true, then healthy people would not be able to gain weight through increased consumption of calories. And....they can.....
     
  8. pboy

    pboy Member

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    I think theres a healthy level of fat , a little more with woman...you know like the healthy full rounded figure that most cultures have always preferred, and with men a robust figure with full calves/thighs/ect. Sometimes people aren't that fat but you can tell the fat they have is more acid protective than healthy storage fat based on just the way it looks, where its stored, and the overall vibrancy of the person. Some woman who might be considered slightly overweight or a bit 'round' by American standards actually have the most vibrancy, stable mood, bright eyes...ect. I dunno though its really hard to tell for sure and theres definatly a fine line between healthy and unhealthy fat. I think though with a very good clean diet, it would be very hard to overeat or just unpleasant to do so, and even if you did you'd have a much better gray area and control mechanism as to how your body dealt with the extra calories
     
  9. montmorency

    montmorency Member

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    My grandfather (who was an amateur athlete in his young day) remained whippet-thin and wiry all his (relatively long) life. He may have appeared to eat all he wanted, but I think in reality, he just knew exactly how much to eat and then stopped. Various stories my Mother has told me confirm this.

    One of his sons (one of my uncles) is just like him in this respect, and his son is the same. However, other sons and daughters were different and all gradually put on weight with age.


    In my various readings over the years, I've seen suggestions that people like my Grandfather, if they ever did happen to over-eat, would spontaneously and unconsciously increase their activity and just naturally burn away the excess. I think there is a technical term for this, but I've forgotten it for the moment.

    Other people like him that I've encountered over the years usually tended to be active, sometimes fidgety people, always on the go.
     
  10. Etost

    Etost New Member

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    I just had to register and bump this thread in order to say that im skinny (65kg/180cm), hypothyroid and have been eating around 3200kcal a day for the last 4 years, sometimes up to 4500kcal. My weight has remained stable and even dropped in periods of stress, while never going below 3000 kcal. I can put on 1-2kg in periods of weightlifting, but lose them in longer periods of no exercise (a month or so). Eating the same amounts of calories.

    If it was as simple as your closed loop theory of calories and fat, Asimov, i would have put on weight, no?
     
  11. tara

    tara Member

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    I don't think 3200 is excess for a normal tall young man.
     
  12. Ulla

    Ulla Member

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    Isnt't that a little to low to be normal? 34.7?
     
  13. answersfound

    answersfound Member

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    I haven't read through the entire post here, but I am seeing a lot of posts about calorie counts. There are SO many variables it is extremely difficult to tell someone how many calories they need. Everything from exercise to just thinking requires calories, for example. When you focus on eating a particular caloric goal or macronutrients ratio, you deactivate your intuition. People make this so complicated. Just eat what you want, within reason. Eat the "peat" foods, and forget about everything else.A dog doesn't think. He eats foods that are good for him and doesn't eat the ones that are bad.
     
  14. Ulla

    Ulla Member

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    Hm I am not sure if I can put your answer to my question into the context but still thanks for sharing. I agree with you. :)

    I just think that the lower range for normal body temperature measured under the armpit is too low...
     
  15. tara

    tara Member

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    I use a digital and keep taking readings till I get two tin a row the same. It often goes up by 1-2 deg C between first and last reading.
    I figure it just takes a while for the tissues and thermometer to reach equilibrium temperature.
     
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