PUFA, From Formula Feeding Or Maternal Obesity, May Cause Leukemia

Discussion in 'Scientific Studies' started by haidut, Aug 28, 2019.

  1. haidut

    haidut Member

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    Another great study, and one of the few that dares point the finger at medicine's Holy Grail - the "essential fatty acids". As the study aptly says, high levels of PUFA in the blood and especially higher levels of linoleic acid predict subsequent development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. While the study is observational, the authors state quite clearly they think the link is causative and they mention evidence that elevated PUFA levels may predict other cancers types in BOTH children and adults. Just as importantly, they also found that PUFA levels are higher in the blood of children fed formula than the breast fed-ones. If the children were breast-fed, the ones with obese mothers had higher levels of PUFA in the blood, which suggests maternal obesity is also driven by PUFA (or at least strongly associated with it). So, in just one study we have evidence that the so-called "essential" fatty acids may cause both maternal obesity and deadly childhood leukemia, and possibly other cancers, and in adults as well. I cringe at the very thought of just how aggressively baby formula is being promoted in maternal wards around the Western world...

    Metabolomics of neonatal blood spots reveal distinct phenotypes of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and potential effects of early-life nutri... - PubMed - NCBI

    "...Because ALL risks had previously been shown to be affected by age at diagnosis[10–13], we stratified cases by early (1-5 years) and late diagnosis (6-14 years) and, indeed, discovered mutually exclusive sets of predictive metabolomic features (Table 1). These 28 metabolites were mainly putative lipids (Table 1), some of which have been found to be perturbed in diagnostic blood for a number of malignancies [31,32] including childhood and adult acute leukemias [33,34]. Our study is unique in that the findings are based on pre-diagnostic blood collected at birth."

    https://factor.niehs.nih.gov/2019/8/papers/dert/

    "...NIEHS grantees revealed associations between the presence of certain metabolites shortly after birth and childhood diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Notably, late-onset ALL patients exhibited more abundant metabolites linked to formula feeding rather than breast milk, indicating a possible role of nutrition in late-onset ALL risk. Using archived neonatal blood spots, the researchers compared 332 children who later developed ALL with 324 healthy children. The newborn blood spots were typically obtained between 24 and 48 hours post-delivery, generally after infants had received multiple feedings. Children diagnosed with ALL were separated by age at diagnosis into two groups: early, 1-5 years; and late, 6-14 years. The researchers identified metabolic features exclusive to each of the two groups of cases compared with controls. Nine metabolites predicted early ALL diagnosis and 19 different metabolites predicted late diagnosis. In the late-diagnosis group, they found a cluster of metabolites that indicated linoleic acid, an essential nutrient, was more abundant in these children than in either the early-onset cases or controls. Linoleic acid metabolites were also greater in infants fed formula rather than breast milk, in the form of colostrum, in the first few days of life. Levels of the metabolites increased with the mother’s pre-pregnancy body mass index, suggesting that mother’s weight may also be involved in late-diagnosis ALL risk."
     
  2. LucyL

    LucyL Member

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    My youngest was in the NICU for a week as a preemie. For the first few days at least there is no option of giving breastmilk, if you even have it available. They get a PUFA based IV. In Europe, they at least use coconut oil as a partial base, but in the US that is not available. They think they are doing the best they can, but the problem is they really don't study or think about what they do. I asked the head doc if it would be appropriate to apply breastmilk (colustrum) topically, and she had the gall to say she didn't know. How could she not know even that? Eh :mad: That was years ago and it still upsets me.
     
  3. OP
    haidut

    haidut Member

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    You are lucky you even got an honest answer. A friend of mine had a baby recently and the baby was also in the NICU for a few days. When she asked for the baby to be given her breast milk she got yelled at by both the NICU doctor and the head nurse that formula was vastly "superior" to her breast milk and in fact "doctor's orders" were after the baby is discharged from the NICU to eat primarily formula supplemented with a tiny amount of breast milk. Or skip the breast milk altogether as the baby is already "loving" the taste of formula and giving her breast milk may cause to reject the formula and start losing weight.
     
  4. LucyL

    LucyL Member

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    That is surprisingly awful. Once my baby had "stabilized" and was "ready" (hospital's philosophy) for real food in the stomach, the hospital wanted him to have breastmilk. They at least knew that preemies do a lot better on breastmilk, and would even do donor milk if the parents approved. Surprised there is so much variation by hospital. But then, I was also pleasantly surprised that one of the nurses was very anti-evidence based medicine :):
     
  5. schultz

    schultz Member

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    Thankfully my wife gave birth to all 3 of ours kids in our home. Not sure I could handle that kind of comment from a doctor or nurse. For one thing, breast milk varies depending on the diet, so what the hell kind of statement is that?

    Edit: Oh and thanks for posting this. Great stuff.
     
  6. Rafael Lao Wai

    Rafael Lao Wai Member

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    Must be related to the vegan agenda. Anything natural is thought to be "gross" or "obsolete", how arrogant can people of the medical establishment be to think that the cells and tissues aren't smart enough to produce a great nourishing substance for a baby? Oh yeah, everything is random and it's just an accident that breast milk exists, my bad... smh

    Also, something interesting that is somewhat related to the OP. Jordan Peterson in the past tried eating a standard crappy diet but without sugar. He didn't lose any weight. He was still eating wheat products and very likely a lot of PUFA, and combing that with my own experience, I'd say PUFA is the main thing for obesity, as well other inflammatory diseases and excessive lactic acid production.

    I'm happy to hear that, hospitals are a terrible environment, for adults and children.

    Comments like that piss me off quite a lot, those people know absolutely nothing about human physiology and talk as if they've read relevant scientific literature everyday for many years, it's really unsettling.
     
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