Inspire Sleep Apnea device

forterpride

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Hello all. Does anybody know if this device is safe or appropriate for sleep apnea within the Ray Peat Sphere? I don’t think it’s works like a regular cpap. Here is the description and website link. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

“Inspire works inside your body while you sleep. It’s a small device placed during a same-day, outpatient procedure. When you’re ready for bed, simply click the remote to turn Inspire on. While you sleep, Inspire opens your airway, allowing you to breathe normally and sleep peacefully.”

 

tankasnowgod

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Hello all. Does anybody know if this device is safe or appropriate for sleep apnea within the Ray Peat Sphere? I don’t think it’s works like a regular cpap. Here is the description and website link. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

“Inspire works inside your body while you sleep. It’s a small device placed during a same-day, outpatient procedure. When you’re ready for bed, simply click the remote to turn Inspire on. While you sleep, Inspire opens your airway, allowing you to breathe normally and sleep peacefully.”


Personally, I think this is a bad idea.

Peat thinks Sleep Apnea is actually due to hyperventilating, and losing too much CO2 during the night. So, this would go directly against Peat's ideas, as does CPAP.


Thiamin, Bag Breathing and Diamox are all cheaper, simpler, and safer.
 

forterpride

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Personally, I think this is a bad idea.

Peat thinks Sleep Apnea is actually due to hyperventilating, and losing too much CO2 during the night. So, this would go directly against Peat's ideas, as does CPAP.


Thiamin, Bag Breathing and Diamox are all cheaper, simpler, and safer.
Thank you. That makes sense. Any guidance on Thiamin and Diamox uses/dosages? It’s for my 59 yr old mother who has sleep apnea.
 
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What would work is something that you put on your nose — it has a valve that makes it a little bit harder to exhale than it is to inhale. That would keep the throat supported so you wouldn’t snore. There is a device like this that is cheap and there is one that is sold as a medical device that is expensive but in principle it would be very simple to make. Increase CO2 rather lowering it..
 
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Sleep apnea is quite protective unless it is severe. Moderate sleep apnea leads to a lower mortality rate over a given time.
 

mostlylurking

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Sleep apnea is said to be caused by hypothyroidism which results in low carbon dioxide. When you stop breathing for a little while the carbon dioxide builds up. I remember Dr. Peat said that is was helpful for your brain when it is reorganizing the fatty acids when you are sleeping. You need that extra carbon dioxide.

http://www.tiredthyroid.com/blog/2016/06/06/sleep-apnea-and-snoring-are-hypothyroid-signs/

Although there are numerous studies about the connection between sleep apnea and hypothyroidism, they report using thyroxine (T4) to test to see if it helps and when it doesn't they think it disproves the connection. Oh well.

Since thiamine deficiency blocks oxidative metabolism and thus increases lactic acid and lowers carbon dioxide it makes sense that it would also be involved in sleep apnea and supplementing with thiamine could be helpful.

I had a problem with sleep apnea and snoring for years. It didn't bother me because I was asleep. But other people complained. And my mouth would fall open and dry out, which can destroy your teeth. My solution was to slide a wide stretchy band (like a very wide head band) made of stretchy knit around my head, from under my jaw to the back of my head. It kept my mouth shut and my tongue right behind my teeth. It worked really well. It was not particularly sexy. But neither is taping your mouth shut with tape, and the tape trick doesn't help with the tongue collapsing backward into your airway.
 

forterpride

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Sleep apnea is said to be caused by hypothyroidism which results in low carbon dioxide. When you stop breathing for a little while the carbon dioxide builds up. I remember Dr. Peat said that is was helpful for your brain when it is reorganizing the fatty acids when you are sleeping. You need that extra carbon dioxide.

http://www.tiredthyroid.com/blog/2016/06/06/sleep-apnea-and-snoring-are-hypothyroid-signs/

Although there are numerous studies about the connection between sleep apnea and hypothyroidism, they report using thyroxine (T4) to test to see if it helps and when it doesn't they think it disproves the connection. Oh well.

Since thiamine deficiency blocks oxidative metabolism and thus increases lactic acid and lowers carbon dioxide it makes sense that it would also be involved in sleep apnea and supplementing with thiamine could be helpful.

I had a problem with sleep apnea and snoring for years. It didn't bother me because I was asleep. But other people complained. And my mouth would fall open and dry out, which can destroy your teeth. My solution was to slide a wide stretchy band (like a very wide head band) made of stretchy knit around my head, from under my jaw to the back of my head. It kept my mouth shut and my tongue right behind my teeth. It worked really well. It was not particularly sexy. But neither is taping your mouth shut with tape, and the tape trick doesn't help with the tongue collapsing backward into your airway.
Thank you. Any pointers on sources and dosing Thiamine for OSA? Appreciate it.
 

Nfinkelstein

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Hello all. Does anybody know if this device is safe or appropriate for sleep apnea within the Ray Peat Sphere? I don’t think it’s works like a regular cpap. Here is the description and website link. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

If you are open to it, you might try the homeopathic remedy lachesis (30c). It stopped my sleep apnea immediately.
 

forterpride

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Sleep apnea is quite protective unless it is severe. Moderate sleep apnea leads to a lower mortality rate over a given time.
Thank you, I’ve never heard this take before. Do you happen to have a source for sleep apnea and lower mortality rates? I read that it reduces lifespan so to hear this is quite interesting. Thank you.
 
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Sleep‐disordered breathing is much more prevalent in elderly people than in middle‐aged or young populations, but its clinical significance in this age group is unclear. This study investigated retrospectively the rates of all‐cause mortality in elderly people (≥ 65 years) with a laboratory diagnosis of sleep apnoea, and compared their rates of mortality with that of age‐, gender‐ and ethnicity‐matched national mortality data. Survival of 611 elderly people was ascertained after a follow‐up of 5.17 ± 1.13 years. Their age was 70.4 ± 4.8 years, body mass index 30.4 ± 5.9 kg m−2 and respiratory disturbance index (RDI) 28.9 ± 20.1 events h−1. Seventy‐five (12.27%) patients died during the follow‐up period. In comparison with the demographically matched cohort from the general population, the standardized mortality rate of the sleep laboratory cohort was 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53–0.88; χ2 = 11.69, P <0.0006]. When calculated separately for patients with RDI < 20 (no/mild apnoea), RDI 20–40 (moderate apnoea) and RDI > 40 events h−1 (severe apnoea) there was a significant survival advantage for the moderate group with a standardized mortality rate of 0.42 (P <0.0002), while elderly people with no/mild apnoea tended to have lower mortality and those with severe sleep apnoea had the same mortality as the matched population cohorts. Cox regression analysis revealed that sleep latency and comorbidities but not sleep apnoea severity were associated independently with mortality. The survival advantage of elderly people with moderate sleep apnoea, combined with recent findings on the potential cardioprotective effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia, raise the possibility that apnoeas during sleep may activate adaptive pathways in the elderly.



Background Although mortality risk associated with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) tends to disappear from the age of 50, it has been suggested that OSA treatment by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves survival even in older subjects. Life expectancy of subjects with several diseases is worse if OSA coexists. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relevance of comorbidities in the relationship between OSA and mortality, and in the effect of CPAP on survival, in subjects ≥ 50 years old.

Methods Data from 810 patients studied by polysomnography for suspected OSA between 1991 and 2000 were retrospectively evaluated. In 2009, state of survival and use of CPAP were enquired. Three hundred and thirteen subjects were < 50 and 497 were ≥ 50 years at diagnosis.

Results Age and comorbidities, but not apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) or lowest nocturnal arterial oxygen saturation (Nadir SaO2), predicted mortality in the whole sample. Nadir SaO2 was related to mortality among the younger subjects without comorbidities (P = 0·01), but not among the older subjects. In the older patients with an AHI > 30 CPAP treatment was associated with a better survival only if comorbidities coexisted.

Conclusions Unlike in younger subjects, in subjects ≥ 50 years old, comorbidities do not mask an effect of OSA on mortality. Among OSA subjects ≥ 50 years old, comorbidities could separate those who may expect an improvement in survival with CPAP treatment from those who may not. Possibly, after the age of 50, OSA per se does not affect survival, but worsens prognosis of subjects with coexisting diseases.
 

forterpride

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Sleep‐disordered breathing is much more prevalent in elderly people than in middle‐aged or young populations, but its clinical significance in this age group is unclear. This study investigated retrospectively the rates of all‐cause mortality in elderly people (≥ 65 years) with a laboratory diagnosis of sleep apnoea, and compared their rates of mortality with that of age‐, gender‐ and ethnicity‐matched national mortality data. Survival of 611 elderly people was ascertained after a follow‐up of 5.17 ± 1.13 years. Their age was 70.4 ± 4.8 years, body mass index 30.4 ± 5.9 kg m−2 and respiratory disturbance index (RDI) 28.9 ± 20.1 events h−1. Seventy‐five (12.27%) patients died during the follow‐up period. In comparison with the demographically matched cohort from the general population, the standardized mortality rate of the sleep laboratory cohort was 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53–0.88; χ2 = 11.69, P <0.0006]. When calculated separately for patients with RDI < 20 (no/mild apnoea), RDI 20–40 (moderate apnoea) and RDI > 40 events h−1 (severe apnoea) there was a significant survival advantage for the moderate group with a standardized mortality rate of 0.42 (P <0.0002), while elderly people with no/mild apnoea tended to have lower mortality and those with severe sleep apnoea had the same mortality as the matched population cohorts. Cox regression analysis revealed that sleep latency and comorbidities but not sleep apnoea severity were associated independently with mortality. The survival advantage of elderly people with moderate sleep apnoea, combined with recent findings on the potential cardioprotective effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia, raise the possibility that apnoeas during sleep may activate adaptive pathways in the elderly.



Background Although mortality risk associated with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) tends to disappear from the age of 50, it has been suggested that OSA treatment by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves survival even in older subjects. Life expectancy of subjects with several diseases is worse if OSA coexists. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relevance of comorbidities in the relationship between OSA and mortality, and in the effect of CPAP on survival, in subjects ≥ 50 years old.

Methods Data from 810 patients studied by polysomnography for suspected OSA between 1991 and 2000 were retrospectively evaluated. In 2009, state of survival and use of CPAP were enquired. Three hundred and thirteen subjects were < 50 and 497 were ≥ 50 years at diagnosis.

Results Age and comorbidities, but not apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) or lowest nocturnal arterial oxygen saturation (Nadir SaO2), predicted mortality in the whole sample. Nadir SaO2 was related to mortality among the younger subjects without comorbidities (P = 0·01), but not among the older subjects. In the older patients with an AHI > 30 CPAP treatment was associated with a better survival only if comorbidities coexisted.

Conclusions Unlike in younger subjects, in subjects ≥ 50 years old, comorbidities do not mask an effect of OSA on mortality. Among OSA subjects ≥ 50 years old, comorbidities could separate those who may expect an improvement in survival with CPAP treatment from those who may not. Possibly, after the age of 50, OSA per se does not affect survival, but worsens prognosis of subjects with coexisting diseases.
Interesting. So if there are co-morbidities...that’s when it becomes an issue? But if not it can be protective? I’m trying to help my 59yr old mother. For now I’ve told her to bag breathe 3 times a day and maybe take Thiamine. Thank you for your time.
 
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i think sleep apnea is another medical industry ripoff mostly. These people who have apnea have underlying issues and by helping them raise their CO2 everything serious will usually resolve.
 

forterpride

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i think sleep apnea is another medical industry ripoff mostly. These people who have apnea have underlying issues and by helping them raise their CO2 everything serious will usually resolve.
Thank you so much. That makes sense.
 

forterpride

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i think sleep apnea is another medical industry ripoff mostly. These people who have apnea have underlying issues and by helping them raise their CO2 everything serious will usually resolve.
Hey ecstatichhamster...check this out! right along with what you were saying. my mind is blown.

 
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the reason I think is that sleep apnea is the brain's way to increase CO2 from someone who is hyperventilating. But stopping the breathing, CO2 builds up. If you interfere with this, CO2 lowers and that's worse.
 

sribop101

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Studies showing protective effects of OSA are very interesting. I don't think they negate the overwhelming evidence linking sleep disordered breathing (SDB) to lower quality of life, all sorts of medical issues, and death but it certainly introduces some nuance. Of course, the elephant in the room is that SDB is fundamentally an issue of craniofacial underdevelopment leading to a deficient airway. Our skulls look vastly different than they did in our ancestors, who had wide dental arches, forward growth of the jaws, and straight teeth. Compare that to how our faces look now: down swung, narrow, practically melted. Our teeth are almost universally crooked until we get orthodontics which typically retract our faces even further. Many people have already covered this in detail, including Mike Mew, James Nestor, Dr. Zaghi over at The Breath Institute, and others. Claiming that OSA is caused by other "underlying medical issues" would almost be funny if it weren't so dangerously misleading. SDB is at epidemic proportions and people are really suffering, even younger, skinny people who you would never think of as having a breathing disorder. I myself have been seriously debilitated by SDB until I recently undertook efforts to expand my airway. If your sleep is getting interrupted every few minutes because you can't breathe, particularly in the deepest, most restorative, levels of sleep, your health will suffer. It's that simple.
 

forterpride

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Studies showing protective effects of OSA are very interesting. I don't think they negate the overwhelming evidence linking sleep disordered breathing (SDB) to lower quality of life, all sorts of medical issues, and death but it certainly introduces some nuance. Of course, the elephant in the room is that SDB is fundamentally an issue of craniofacial underdevelopment leading to a deficient airway. Our skulls look vastly different than they did in our ancestors, who had wide dental arches, forward growth of the jaws, and straight teeth. Compare that to how our faces look now: down swung, narrow, practically melted. Our teeth are almost universally crooked until we get orthodontics which typically retract our faces even further. Many people have already covered this in detail, including Mike Mew, James Nestor, Dr. Zaghi over at The Breath Institute, and others. Claiming that OSA is caused by other "underlying medical issues" would almost be funny if it weren't so dangerously misleading. SDB is at epidemic proportions and people are really suffering, even younger, skinny people who you would never think of as having a breathing disorder. I myself have been seriously debilitated by SDB until I recently undertook efforts to expand my airway. If your sleep is getting interrupted every few minutes because you can't breathe, particularly in the deepest, most restorative, levels of sleep, your health will suffer. It's that simple.
Interesting Sribop. May I ask what things you’ve done to treat your underline SDB? How have you expanded your airways? Any routine I can give my mother would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 

sribop101

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Interesting Sribop. May I ask what things you’ve done to treat your underline SDB? How have you expanded your airways? Any routine I can give my mother would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
Each case is unique and different things will work for different people. Does she have any nasal obstruction? Try Breathe Right strips or nose dilator cones. Tendency to breathe through the mouth? Try mouth taping. Any sort of allergies or general stuffiness? I'd recommend an anti-histamine like Claritin or some nasal drops or a soothing throat spray. Sometimes low humidity plays a role too in which case a humidifier in the bedroom can help. Personally I'm going to try this soon since the air is very dry where I live.

It could also be sleeping position related. Typically, sleeping on the back is worst; sleeping on the sides or stomach is better. Inclined bed therapy helps some people. A cervical collar (to keep the neck straight and the airway open) helps others. It's entirely up to her experience.

Of course, there's PAP therapy. This really helps some people, but most are unable to tolerate. I was one of those people. Long term consequences of wearing the mask are probably not good - her jaws will likely retract even further. Same goes for mandibular advancement devices - they mess up your bite in the long term and exacerbate problems long term.

Does she have a tongue tie? I'm getting mine released next week; it seems to help in some cases and hurts in others. If she has a narrow palate, I recommend an appliance like DNA or Homeoblock to expand her maxilla. Expanding the maxilla makes room for the tongue and increases airway space. Other options include the ALF appliance or MSE, which is effective but much more invasive. I'm personally using the Homeoblock and have experienced very positive changes already.

Anyway, I know I'm throwing a lot at you here; this has been my life focus for the last 6+ months ever since I discovered the root cause of my chronic fatigue, headaches, anxiety, IBS, myalgia... it is a laundry list of symptoms. Head over to the The Great Work forum to learn more about expansion options if you're interested.
 

forterpride

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Each case is unique and different things will work for different people. Does she have any nasal obstruction? Try Breathe Right strips or nose dilator cones. Tendency to breathe through the mouth? Try mouth taping. Any sort of allergies or general stuffiness? I'd recommend an anti-histamine like Claritin or some nasal drops or a soothing throat spray. Sometimes low humidity plays a role too in which case a humidifier in the bedroom can help. Personally I'm going to try this soon since the air is very dry where I live.

It could also be sleeping position related. Typically, sleeping on the back is worst; sleeping on the sides or stomach is better. Inclined bed therapy helps some people. A cervical collar (to keep the neck straight and the airway open) helps others. It's entirely up to her experience.

Of course, there's PAP therapy. This really helps some people, but most are unable to tolerate. I was one of those people. Long term consequences of wearing the mask are probably not good - her jaws will likely retract even further. Same goes for mandibular advancement devices - they mess up your bite in the long term and exacerbate problems long term.

Does she have a tongue tie? I'm getting mine released next week; it seems to help in some cases and hurts in others. If she has a narrow palate, I recommend an appliance like DNA or Homeoblock to expand her maxilla. Expanding the maxilla makes room for the tongue and increases airway space. Other options include the ALF appliance or MSE, which is effective but much more invasive. I'm personally using the Homeoblock and have experienced very positive changes already.

Anyway, I know I'm throwing a lot at you here; this has been my life focus for the last 6+ months ever since I discovered the root cause of my chronic fatigue, headaches, anxiety, IBS, myalgia... it is a laundry list of symptoms. Head over to the The Great Work forum to learn more about expansion options if you're interested.
tremendous post. Thank you so much. If you don't mind me asking you one more question...What are your thoughts on bag breathing and it's effectiveness? Thanks Sribop.
 

sribop101

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tremendous post. Thank you so much. If you don't mind me asking you one more question...What are your thoughts on bag breathing and it's effectiveness? Thanks Sribop.
Happy to help. I think bag breathing is great. More generally, I recommend buteyko breathing for reaping the benefits of nitric oxide and increased CO2, and learning to thrive off less oxygen. Check out The Oxygen Advantage by Patrick Mckeown for more info. It's effective for all sorts of conditions, including SDB.
 
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