Would A Knowledgeable Doctor Be Helpful Around Here?

Discussion in 'Ask For Help or Advice' started by Heroico, May 4, 2020.

  1. Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    So, briefly, I am a neurologist who has been following Peat for many years, and the Forum for about a year. I actually came across RP in the 1980s as I was thinking about William Blake and his ideas about thermodynamics. (Blake says there is a limit to contraction but no limit to expansion; thermodynamics is deeply ingrained in his psychology and physics and ultimately, his endocrinlogy- a Blakean endocrinologist!)
    We corresponded a bit and he led me to Russian literature (Vernadsky, Pavlov, many othersi in basic science) and I was fortunate enough to be close to Michael Polayni's circle and to have corresponded with and spoken once to Gilbert Ling.

    Over these years physiological thinking has been steadily replaced with entities and products and processes Marx would love to explain to you.

    A good thing about Covid-19 is that telemedicine has opened up. The reason, I think, that telemedicine has beep prevented is that the state medical societies are fearful that somebody from overseas will do what they do for a fraction of the cost and far better.. There was always the threat that it iwould be malpractice to prescribe without an "exam". I thank the virus for getting us past that.

    So I am thinking of working with referrals from and to the RP community. Mostly what I might be able to add is some prescriptions and ordering bloodwork. Particularly, there is rapidly evolving brain imaging (volumetric MRI, spectroscopy) and I would dearly love to work with the community on cognition and Alzheiemer's as a metabolic problem. Also, I suspect that an interested patient would like to see what their thymus is doing. (again probably MRI). For these sorts of things, we would try to get covereage and if denied perhaps there would be enough volume to negotiate reduction in imaging cost as a group. There are many other things that come to mind.

    Thoughts or advice?
     
  2. Here is how you spell Alzheimer's . Additionally, it is not really a " disease " since it was names after a doctor of the same name that said it was caused by amyloid plaque, which has not been debunked. So..... that is probably the reason that there is " no cure " for it. Dementia is probably what you are talking about, and Dr Peat has plenty to say about that one. So many kinds of it and most leading back to metabolic issues caused by many things. Telemedicine is great for dealing with doctors out of the USA that are not working for Big Pharma so yes on that.
     
  3. S-VV

    S-VV Member

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    Hello heroico,

    of course a doctor would be helpful around here. But first, you need to pass the Questions of Fire. Failure to answer correctly will lead to immediate execution via Omega-6 infusion.

    - Best physiology book?
    - Do you believe ATP is used to maintain resting membrane potential?
    - “To understand life is to understand the electron” agree or disagree?
    - Why does neuro-anatomy induce I/R injury when studying it?
    - Favourite basal ganglia structure?
     
  4. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    Thanks for your thoughts. I agree completely with you. Including the spelling correction.

    When I said I was knowledgeable I meant about RP- but not nearly as knowledgable as many who post here. The quality of the people and their thinking are what attracted me here, and working with difficult clinical problems with the community.

    A couple of stories. I have a patient who has a surgical procedure to take off the back of her skull. Basically she ha an incidental Chiari (this is what happens when radiologists and surgeons hang out together). She has severe headaches and cannot regulate her spinal pressure after the surgery. She was unable to tolerate multiple carbonic anhydrease inhibitors and diuretics at previous neurologists and multiople national medical centers. She applied for disability and then came to see me. Haidut had written about thiamine as a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, and thanks to his research I was able to recommend that and... it wored. For, specifically, her "high pressure" headaaches that responded to lumbar puncture and CSF drainage. But she continued to have severe, daily "migraines" (I'm quite comfortable putting disease entities into quotation marks since the name doesn't reflect the physiological process that got her there). There are many, many things that were tried and failed. Again, from Haidut's article on methylene blue, I started using low dose intranasal methylene blue, both as Oxydal and other preparations, and also oral in the range of 8 mg. The result has been extraordinary, She is no longer applying for disability and her depression has cleared as well (I think the MB but the lack of pain helps too). I have a video of her response to the first intranasal MG (1 mg)- free of headache for the first tie in years. It was quite a party. She is still doing well on oral maintenance 4-8 mg daily.

    When I was 13 my mother ruptured a cerebral aneurysm in front of me and spent a year at NIH. She suffered a massive stroke during surgery and we lived 40 years with her fighting to recover just a little bit more. More recently I lost a son to cancer. It is painful for me to consider the terrible suffering others experience. Probably you and I will too.

    Again, thanks for your thoughts, as well as the intensity of your feelings about these matters.
     
  5. raysputin

    raysputin Member

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    I think it would be helpful.

    Do vaccines cause autism?
     
  6. GMT100

    GMT100 Member

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    @Heroico sounds good and all but the real question is, can you prescribe thyroid, acetylzolamide and some common antibiotics to those who genuinely can benefit from it?
     
  7. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    I accept your questions and trial by fire.
    .
    Best physiology book: hmmm, that's tough. I'm gong to pass over my beloved Pavlov for the paper by Kuramoto on mean field coupled oscillators. But Gilbert Ling's works are really fundamental. Maybe that's physics or chemistry. Frankly, Ray Peat's essay on Cascara is the best medical writing EVER.

    ATP: I'm not sure who really ever believed this. I may be naive but I was at U.Va. Medical School in the 1970s and the brighter people didin'dt think the energy numbers worked out right even back then. I think really good people are just going through the motions about the cell energetics since they are paid to work on tinker toy mechanisms that support products.

    Electron: nope. This is a deep subject. Have you read Michael Polayni's PErsonal Knowledge, Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy? He was origianlly a biochemist that did some Ling-like early aork on membranes. Anyway, I have been writing a revision of set theory for many years... the basic problem for physical theories is that point set topology hasn't been adapted to the sciences. I don't think gravvitation and quanta are going to fut together, and for someone to suggest that a naked electron explains anything flabbergasts me. One conclusion i have come to is that rotation in Euclidean space always generates uncomputable sequences.- I can get very heavy on this, even tiresome. In any event, no.

    I/R perfusion injury and thinking: hey, I like your questions. I suspect the peripheral nervous system, and energy budgeting of the whole organism, controls the number of parallel processors. So sympathetic discharge reduces cortical blood flow, there is symmetry breaking and thre are fewer processors, thus a quicker decision time because less nodes to reach consenses (that scales as 2^n). If too much discharge the output becomes random, like being in a bursning house and running.So after concentrating there will be reperfusion. I'm not sure I'm with you on "injury"- the deep question there is what good are the bad things like estrogen and stress? I tend to think short duration stress may be okay, but am sympathetic to the fact that we eventually die of the bad stuff so demonizing it is the right place to start. Every time I boubt Peat I look stupid.

    Favorite basal ganglia structure? The fornix, of course, silly.
     
  8. methylenewhite

    methylenewhite Member

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  9. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    Do vaccines cause autism? I don't know. There are discontinuities in childhood onset mental illness- they can come on all of a sudden.

    I don't trust the FDA- they do these big population studies and make pronouncements (good example is fluoxtetine and suicide but the examples are legion- e.g.everything Ioannides says). I would imagine there are many unique populations out there. So I don't believe they know if everyone who changed after vaccine did so unrelated to the v,accine. On the other hand, I have knownmothers whom I felt fit better into "Munchausen's by proxy" than mother of autism- that exists too!

    It helps to have many years of experience, even if I don't know what the answer is. I think if you are going to call the answer as to whether vaccines cause autism, or if a particular child was injured by a vaccine, you better have a hell of a lot of experience around sick people. Not medical arrogance, And again, I don't know.
     
  10. Amazoniac

    Amazoniac Member

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    People complain that doctors are arrogant, yet when one appears acting humble and asking for approval, it casts doubt and it's almost an invitation for being put to test. To be fair, some degree of immodesty is expect'd from someone that can lead, we need to convey that not believing that your presence is a favor to those around you is unusual.

    Where are you?
     
  11. RealNeat

    RealNeat Member

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    Yes, welcome. Id like to put in an order for Losartan and Acetazolamide with a side of Doxycycline thank you! :angelic:

    But really, hello, im all for it however I am concerned about the EMF aspect of MRI. Do you happen to follow Jack Kruse who is a neurosurgeon? Hes quite an intense individual with a rather rigid view of alternatives things (yes puzzling) but him and Peat have quite a few overlaps in their view of health.

    Anyway, Jack used MRI a lot and has now stopped using as much because of EMF concerns.

    Second, how do you feel about working in your field knowing what Peat has to say, do you have to hold your tongue or do you just do what you want to do and just roll with the punches?

    Thank you
     
  12. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    I'm in North Carolina, we have two adult children in DC, one applying to medical schools there, and a granddaughter on the way. So DC for sure.

    Re MRI: what I remember from Dr. Kruze was concern about gadolinium, a contrast agent which persists, rather than the EMF. I think concern about this is pretty mainstream. With respect to the EMF, I would expect them to have subtle resonant effects that could do anything- have you read Tesla? (smile)
    But I don't currently have concern and actually think an external control pulse can transiently improve mood and might be a good treatment. I havae worked in this kind of thing over the years.
    But, there are very knowledgable people here, and I would be inclined to work toward consensus on imaging testing, such that it might be achievable. The topics that come up are fascinating.
     
  13. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    Also, your question regarding how I feel is very kind. I feel very sad. I just haven't learned helplessness yet.
     
  14. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    Can trepanation increase brain metabolism? Wow! Any "injury" goes through physiological phases. The great example is cyclical menstruation- I think of that every time I think about wound healing. There is a cascade of pain, nervous system response, extravasation, clotting, fibrosis, eventually differentiation. The local wound steals from the entire organism to go through this progression. So there is local increase in metabolism, and in a healthy organism the entire metabolism will compensate or even hypertrophy for a bit. Kind of like a wave that eventually settles, yes? Ultmately your question is one about the standing of hormesis here.
     
  15. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    Another part of this- I've been thinking of a regular podcast when we move to DC, where we would take one patient nominated by the forum and talk with them for an hour or so, with community input and discussion. There's nothing like this that I know of, where you have one patient and all the time you need to really go through all their problems and discuss their connections and the politics of it and all that the meds are doing. Kind of an open discussion of the issues. I think it would be fascinating. We could have regular guests from the forum and callins.
     
  16. S-VV

    S-VV Member

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    Amazing. My academic background is in mathematics. I always had a special attraction towards group theory, perhaps because out of a few axions and some ancilliary definitions complex and beautiful structures seem to emerge almost organically. I have also pondered the question of continuity, its meaning in the physical world etc... I would love to know more about your thoughts.

    It seems I have some very interesting reading to do...

    "Tinker toys". That reminds me of the way I see much of modern research into cellular biology, its just so byzantine. No unifiyng principles, just random networks of regulatory proteins with ever more ridiculous names. This is so evident when I read old papers: the enzyme and hormone names make sense and point to a unified and coherent whole. nowadays we have proteins like "hedgehog", "frizzeled", "dicer/drosha" etc... Its almost as if the researchers know that its all just a semantics game without meaning.

    Your knowledge is amazing, and you pass the trial with great success. I am very much looking forward to learning from you. Thanks for joining the forum Heroico.

    By the way, Heroico, is your username from Spanish or Latin?
     
  17. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    S-VV- my username came out of some exchanges with Haidut regarding how to think about anecdote. The data sets are huge, and the "gold standard" FDA study, even if it were not corrupt, can't search the pile. ("The Golden Rule" of Controlled Trials- He Who Has The Gold Asks the Questions!). Anyway, I was getting geared up to try something very radical- a public large scale open study of methyene blue for Alzheimer's- and I wanted Ioannides to give some academic support to the idea that a large scale open putlic study would be more efficient at harvesting anaecdote than our present control-and-repress. Anyway, Heroico is the name of a picture of Chez Guevara. He has really good hair there too.

    Regarding tinker toys and control parameters, I experienced first hand how the discovery ofthe structure DNA has ruined biology. You are so right- the books prior to the DNA debacle contained the thoughts of poeple whose ability to think had not atrophied. I am so fortunate that RP came along- he and others on this site are my bettors.

    Your questions are eextremely perceptive and really wonderful. The paper I've been writing for a few decades is titled "uncomputable numbers and spherical minds". I think of Turing coputation as occurring in the complex plane with i axis being anythuing finite/recurring (rotation) and discrete real axis being translation, and give the space a measure of probability 1. Then the halting problem is geometrically decidable Hamkins , Miasnikov : The Halting Problem Is Decidable on a Set of Asymptotic Probability One . Then you can see that the "thin set" - perhaps better called a "centrifugal set" because of its mass-like qualities- close to the ordinal limit is inside any thing- anything with a bound. Keep after me for details- I've written this paper maybe 500 times, seriously. I"ll probably find out there's something wrong with the idea some day when real mathematicians work it over. ( If I get tiresome just tell me.)
     
  18. OP
    Heroico

    Heroico Member

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    Regarding symmetry groups, the E2 symmetry group allows translation and rotation only.- the movements used by a Turing machine. Polya recurrence limits recurrence intrinsically to two dimensions. Everything is bounds and centers of rotation in this view when you look at computation in the complex plane. This is really the way to think about metabolism as opposed to tinker toys in my view...
     
  19. yerrag

    yerrag Member

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    Welcome, Heroico. How do you see yourself with regards to being a theoreticist and with regards to being a practicalist? By this definition in my view of it: A theoreticist would understand a lot of the existing theoretical groundwork but suffers from not being to provide a practical solution, while a practicalist gets to find a solution while not really understanding the theoretical framework of his approach. On a scale of 1 being a theoreticist and of 10 being a practicalist.
     
  20. jamies33

    jamies33 Member

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    @Heroico if the basal ganglia were calcified, how could you decalcify it?
     
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